Kindle magazine bestsellers April 22 2012

Kindle magazine bestsellers April 22 2012

I haven’t looked at this in a while, so it was interesting to see.

One of the big selling points of the Kindle Fire was how good magazines were going to look on it.

Well, the bestsellers are affected by Kindle Fire editions…but the RSK (Reflective Screen Kindle) editions are still strongly represented. Do you read magazines on your phone? It seems like it would be small, but I’d be interested to hear about it if you do.

We subscribe to National Geographic…and it does look beautiful on the Fire. My Significant Other waits for the next issue to read at the gym. I read those, and a couple of other magazines…but not ones for which we pay through the Kindle store. I get one through Zinio, and the other is a freebie I get for subscribing to the paper edition.

When you subscribe to these, you get a fourteen day free trial (which is generally going to be one magazine). You pay for them by the month (not an annual subscription), and you can typically buy a single issue.  The single issue may cost you more than a month’s subscription will, though.

You can share magazine subscriptions with other compatible devices on your account. We read NatGeo on two Kindle Fires, but only pay one subscription price, for example.

Okay, here are the top ten bestsellers:

#1. Reader’s Digest
published since 1922
available for
Kindle
Kindle Touch
Kindle Keyboard
Kindle DX
Kindle (2nd Generation)
Kindle (1st Generation)
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)
Kindle for Android

RD is famous for having short little pieces, like jokes and true stories, often contributed by readers.

#2 National Geographic Magazine
published since 1888
available for
Kindle
Kindle Touch
Kindle Fire
Kindle Keyboard
Kindle DX
Kindle (2nd Generation)
Kindle (1st Generation)
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)
Kindle for Android

For us, this is well worth $1.99 a month. On the Fire, the pictures are stunning (and you can pinch and spread them…I’ve done that to show the Fire’s capabilities). The articles are often in-depth on very narrow exotic topics, and I do find that fascinating.

#3 Cosmopolitan
published 1886 (this incarnation basically since 1965)
available for
Kindle Fire
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)

Cosmo is probably best known for the “Cosmo quizzes”…and these are NSFW (Not Safe For Work). Let’s just say that some people may be happy that the cover doesn’t show when reading this on a Fire. ;)

#4 Shape
published since 1981
available on
Kindle
Kindle Touch
Kindle Fire
Kindle Keyboard
Kindle DX
Kindle (2nd Generation)
Kindle (1st Generation)
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)
Kindle for Android

You can pay to subscribe, or you get it free with the paper edition (P+D…Paper Plus Digital).

It’s a health and exercise magazine marketed for women…they note that not all images from the paper edition may appear in the Kindle edition.

#5 OK!
published since 1993
available on
Kindle Fire
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)

This one is just focused on celebrities and “entertainment gossip”.

Interesting! When I went from the first five to the full list, I had a different order…and it included the app versions. What I did was list the most popular ones I hadn’t listed yet that were not apps. That’s not to say that the app version isn’t is good,  but it’s definitely a different thing.

6. Us Weekly
published since 1977
available on
Kindle Fire
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)

More celebrities…”they’re just like us!” So, if you want a picture of Bradley Cooper stopping to tie a loose shoelace, or Jennifer Aniston putting a cup of coffee on the roof of the car to open the door, this is the magazine for you!

7. Maxim
published since 1995 (in the UK, 1998 in the USA)
available on
Kindle Fire
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)
Kindle for Android

This is what is called a “men’s magazine”, as opposed to Cosmo (above). The main difference in the covers? The people in the covers on Cosmo are more likely to wear pants… ;)

8. The Economist – US Edition
published since 1843
available on
Kindle
Kindle Touch
Kindle Fire
Kindle Keyboard
Kindle DX
Kindle (2nd Generation)
Kindle (1st Generation)
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)
Kindle for Android

Hm…I wonder how many times Cosmo, Maxim, and The Economist are on the same list? ;)

9. Harvard Business Review
published since 1922
available on
Kindle
Kindle Touch
Kindle Fire
Kindle Keyboard
Kindle DX
Kindle (2nd Generation)
Kindle (1st Generation)
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)
Kindle for Android

Oh, okay, good…The Economist will have somebody to sit with in the Kindle Newsstand cafeteria. ;)

10. Star
published since 1974
available on
Kindle Fire
Kindle for iPad (Version 2.9 or later)
Kindle for iPhone (Version 3.0 or later)

This is a celebrity tabloid (P+D)…definitely the shallow end of the news pool, and I’m sure they like it that way. :)

Well, that’s the top ten! There are a lot of other choices, and as I mentioned, you can get them other places, too.

I really like it when a magazines offers both “page view” and “text view”. The former is a replica of the print edition…ads and all. The latter includes pictures in the article, but otherwise, seems a lot easier to read. When I was compiling the list, I noticed that some indicated that…good to know ahead of time, even with a free trial.

It’s worth noting that if you want to cancel a subscription, you do it at

http://www.amazon.com/manageyourkindle

Then, click Subscription Settings.

The other thing I’ve seen confuse people is that the magazine will continue to be paid by the credit card you used when you bought it, even if you change your 1-click method. You change that in that MYK page, then Kindle Payment Settings.

One last thing: this is the post I mentioned that I was writing, and then lost. The order of the magazines changed rapidly in just a couple of days…I didn’t expect it to be quite so dynamic. :)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

 

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19 Responses to “Kindle magazine bestsellers April 22 2012”

  1. Pam Says:

    I’m spoiled and like my mags on the iPad because it’s larger and easier to read. I get several mags that I get print subscriptions for and can get free digital copies on the iPad and Fire, so that’s a plus! And it’s also cheaper that way than buying the digital version. But if I know I’m going to be waiting somewhere, I take the Fire with me because the size is more convenient. I guess I have it all! :)

  2. Sherri Says:

    I read the New Yorker and Vanity Fair on my Fire, and those are both app-based subscriptions. I also read Sports Illustrated, since I have access to that free with my print subscription. It’s also an app.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Sherri!

      My Entertainment Weekly is app-based and free with my print subscription…it works okay. I do wish wad text view on it, though.

  3. jennifer cline Says:

    I love national Geographic on the fire also but love Smithsonian as well,wish readers digest was on the fire.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, jennifer!

      I think RD will come to the Fire. There has to be some cost involved in preparing another format of a magazine, and they may think, perhaps, that RD is so text heavy (if you ignore the cartoons) it won’t be as attractive to Fire users. People read plain text on the Fire, I think more than most people (including me) anticipated.

  4. Zebras Says:

    I read People on my Fire, only because I get it free because we get the mailed subscription. This way hubby and I can read it at the same time. I enjoy the pictures more on the fire screen, Its optimized for the Kindle since its an App, and you can watch movie trailers that go along with the reviews, or link directly to the Amazon page to buy a book from the book review, same for music.

    Negatives are, no crossword puzzle, which is my husband’s favorite part of the magazine, sometimes I feel I might miss some content, since I might forget to click a link inside a page, or clicked a link in the TOC and skipped stuff. Also it takes forever to download each edition, and it seems to stop downloading if you want to do something else on the Fire while its doing it.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Zebras!

      That download speed is worth noting…not surprisingly (since they take up so much more memory) they take considerably longer than a typical book. I’ve also had a magazine download get stopped half-way through.

      It’s not a big deal…we might be talking a minute rather than ten seconds or so, but it’s there.

  5. Lady Galaxy Says:

    I realized after reading this that I hadn’t checked out Kindle magazines in awhile, so I went to the Kindle store to have a look. I decided to sign up for a trial of “American Scholar.” I found an interesting article there called “Reading Fast and Slow” which included some analysis of how reading on a Kindle is similar to and different from reading from a book. As a former reading teacher, I found this article very informative. Since my most “up to date” Kindle is a Kindle Keyboard, I still get very generic forms of magazines. Still, I found enough interesting in this sample to keep the subscription going for awhile. Thanks for the reminder.

  6. Common Sense Says:

    The mags are great on the Kindle Fire. So much so that I canceled my Reader’s Digest subscription for my K3 and will pick it up again in June for my Fire – through Zinio.

    I prefer magazines through Zinio because there’s no worrying about keeping issues or using it on more than one device. Unlike Amazon, all of your issues are always in your Library and all you have to do is install the app on each device, then log into your account. I can read them on my laptop, phone, or Kindle Fire, as can everyone else on our account, and we all get each new issue.

    Much, much better than the Amazon way, where I can only send new issues to one device and have to go to Manage My Kindle to send issues to other devices.

    We recently got new Android phones and Zinio was pre-installed. It works great! I thought that the screen would be too small to enjoy a magazine, and it is a bit more awkward than a larger device, but with pinch and zoom it works fine. The resolution is nice too. Magazines are good for those short periods of time which may be too short to get into a book.

    On a related note, all of those Amazon apps are great for your phone. I have my own Amazon account for my books and my music, but we have a shared family account for Kindle Fire stuff like apps, Prime, and the “boy” books. My daughter also has her own account for her books since she and I are the two bookworms. With the apps, we can have the Kindle for Android app linked to our individual accounts, the MP3 app linked to my account, the Amazon Appstore for all of the apps, all on the same device. I wish it worked that way on the Fires.

    Also, Amazon has a number of magazines for the Fire that are 90-day trials instead of the usual 14 days.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Common!

      Oh, I absolutely agree…subscriptions through Zinio are more consumer-friendly. I would venture, though, without looking that they are probably more expensive.

      I don’t like the “rolling seven” on Kindle magazines…that you only have seven issues unless you choose to “keep” one, and if you do that, it’s only local storage. I do go back and re-read magazines decades later sometimes, and Zinio is more likely to give me that option.

      Maybe I’ll try reading my Zinio mag on my SmartPhone…I’m a bit skeptical because of the size, but I shouldn’t pre-judge it.

      • Common Sense Says:

        I haven’t compared all prices, but the Reader’s Digest is $18 at Amazon and $10 at Zinio. There’s also an app so I assume you get the digital free with the paper subscription. For me, I don’t like that because the point of digital is to get rid of the piles of paper.

  7. Common Sense Says:

    I forgot to add that even though I prefer Zinio, I do have Amazon magazines, both regular and apps, because not every magazine is available through both services.

  8. Edward Boyhan Says:

    Some years back(before I even got my 1st kindle) I decided to convert all my periodical subscriptions to digital when they came up for renewal (and if they didn’t have a digital subscription cancel them). That process completed a year or so ago.

    I get a bunch of technical magazines most of which have independently converted themselves into webzines (killing their print versions in the process — a harbinger??). I get emails when new issues are available, and I can view their content on a web page.

    I also get Scientific American, The Economist, Analog Science Fiction, The Communications of the ACM (a technical journal), and the Wall Street Journal. Of these only Analog comes via Amazon (more on this below). The Economist is apparently available (per your post) via Amazon, but I get their direct digital edition (I can pay for this annually). This doesn’t give me a single issue rather a series of emails outlining the latest content in the magazine (as well as quite a bit of stuff that’s not in the magazine), which I can view on their website if the topic interests me. My WSJ subscription is much the same save that in addition I get an email outlining page by page what’s in the paper, and also the option to download the paper, if I want (save for very occasionally looking at the front page, I DON’T want). Scientific American and CACM send me an email each month announcing the latest issue with a link that lets me download a PDF of the whole magazine (with ads) or individual articles — I can also read on their web pages, if I desire.

    Recently, the WSJ added an Android app for the WSJ which is KF compatible, and available in the Amazon app store. I have used it, but I’m used to the web page layouts and navigation, so I don’t anticipate using it much — on my brief experiments, it seems limited in comparison with the web page access. The KF web browser is quite functional — so I’m not sure why reading a periodical in an app might be better than reading it on the KF via the web browser? I could read Scientific American on the web browser, but so far I am downloading (side-loading) the PDF of the whole issue into the documents folder of my KF (where it appears as a personal document). This matches reading the print version pretty closely. I do the same with CACM. I use EZ-Pdf reader to read these — experience is good. I’ll have to research the Economist a bit more, but I’m not a fan of monthly charges for subscriptions.

    That leaves Analog, the only “true” Amazon kindle subscription. I can (and have) read Analog on any of my kindles (KDX, KF, KT). The formatting/presentation is different for Analog on RSK vs KF — I prefer the KF layout — it does a better job with illustrations.

    Many of my periodical and blog subscriptions (including yours, Bufo) can be viewed in summary form using an app such as Pulse (which is the one I use). This presents a nicely formatted index of indexes into the contents of my various subscriptions — it generally provides links to their web page content — works quite well on the KF — I wouldn’t recommend doing anything that I described above that is browser-based from an RSK.

    I’m guessing that app periodical readers are geared more towards smartphones than tablets. Personally, I rarely read anything other than email headlines on my phone.

    • Edward Boyhan Says:

      Oh, and Pulse gives you indexes to periodicals and blogs for which you may not have subscriptions. When you follow the link to the article,you may or may not get access — depending on individual publications policies (for example the NYT gives you access to 10 articles/month). You can categorize the Pulse display (within some limits) to match your needs.

  9. Edward Boyhan Says:

    I forgot to add I don’t have subscriptions to the Washington Post, NYT, LA Times, the International Herald Tribune, or the Financial Times of London, but I do get daily emails from them outlining all their content. Chrome has the ability to take the links to articles in these emails, and feed them into Google search. If you then click on the Google result you will (currently) be taken to the article bypassing the pay-wall.

  10. vrwl Says:

    Rolling Stone magazine along with Texas Monthly are my picks, but I’m having a difficult time adjusting to reading them on the Fire. Too small for the full page, but I’m not happy with the article view either. :(

  11. Round up #91: Best books, headphone deal, Flipboard « I Love My Kindle Says:

    [...] magazine. There are some great magazines available on tablets (the old media ones do sell there: Kindle Magazine bestsellers). However, is the “once a month” or even “once a week” model the best way [...]

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