Archive for the ‘Games’ Category

Name the literary decade game

June 15, 2014

Name the literary decade game

I’m terrible with time.

Oh, not in getting things done…I’m actually pretty good at that, and have successfully taught it to other people.

No, it’s in knowing how long ago something happened.

When I remember something, I don’t inherently know if it happened last year or ten years ago.

I can figure it out from internal clues, and I’m not saying I remember everything equally well…but chronology has never been my strong suit.

I think that’s why I love timelines. :)

It’s a bit like enjoying watching an athlete play a sport that you just can’t do very well…it’s an astonishing feat!

I have a timeline for this blog for e-books and related matters:

http://ilmk.wordpress.com/timeline/

It starts in 1455…

I have another much broader (and geekier) one at my The Measured Circle blog:

The Measured Circle Pop Culture Timeline

However, that doesn’t mean I’m bad at dates, necessarily, in a trivia sense…I think I’m just bad at sequencing.

I often do things with no sequence, which surprises people. If you are in a shopping mall, and I ask you where you parked, my understanding is that most people actually visualize the path back to the car. I just know where the car is…often not visualizing it at all, if there is a stall number (3rd floor, stall 342, for example).

Regular readers know that I also don’t typically visualize when I read, which I know is also somewhat unusual.

I always remember when my Significant Other asked where a particular year’s taxes were. I said something like, “In the library, on top of the shelf  on the wall with the window, fourth stack from the right, about a third of the way up, next to something yellow.” :) The stacks weren’t in order: I just knew what was where in them.

So, that brings us to our little game for today. :)

I’m going to give you some books, you tell me the decade when they were first published (we’ll go with first published in the USA, to keep this simple).

There will be eleven different quizzes, for each decade from the 1900s through the 2000s (I wanted to stop before the current decade). A decade will not be the correct answer for two different quizzes.

Oh, and I used

Random.org

to randomize the order of the questions…I find that a very useful site!

Ready? Here we go!

Name the literary decade #1

Name the literary decade #2

Name the literary decade #3

  • Brave New World
  • Of Mice & Men
  • The Good Earth

Name the literary decade #4

  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • In Cold Blood

Name the literary decade #5

  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
  • A Room with a View
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit

Name the literary decade #6

  • Tarzan of the Apes
  • Sons and Lovers
  • The Metamorphosis

Name the literary decade #7

  • Gravity’s Rainbow
  • Interview with the Vampire
  • The Stepford Wives

Name the literary decade #8

  • A Brief History of Time
  • The Unbearable Lightness of Being
  • The Joy Luck Club

Name the literary decade #9

  • The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
  • Zorba the Greek
  • A Streetcar Named Desire

Name the literary decade #10

  • The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
  • Things Fall Apart
  • Lord of the Flies

Name the literary decade #11

  • Winnie-the-Pooh
  • The Prophet
  • The Great Gatsby

I’ll publish the answers in the next few days. Honestly? I think I would have gotten all of them. :) How do you think you did? You can let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

My new free Flipboard magazine, The Weird Old Days features vintage articles on ghosts, sea serpents, psychic phenomena, and more http://flip.it/ZtmYw

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Answers to “Their other books” #1

June 11, 2014

Answers to “Their other books” #1

A couple of days ago, I posted

Their other books

which was a game based on the

Amazon Author Rank (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

page. I listed books by the 100 top authors ranked there…not their most popular books (based on the ranking), but one of them. The game was to see how many authors you could name. If you’d like to try it, please first go to the link above.

These are in order: the #1 author below is the Amazon’s “most popular” author:

  1. Looking for Alaska: John Green (most popular book: The Fault in Our Stars)
  2. Revival: Stephen King (Mr. Mercedes)
  3. Insurgent: Veronica Roth (Allegiant…these are both part of the Divergent series)
  4. A Feast for Crows: George R.R. Martin (part of the “Game of Thrones” series, although the series is really called “A Song of Ice and Fire”)
  5. Middle School: Get Me out of Here!: James Patterson (Unlucky 13)
  6. Dark Witch: Nora Roberts (The Collector)
  7. City of Lost Souls: Cassandra Clare (part of The Mortal Instruments series)
  8. The Space Between: Diana Gabaldon (part of the Outlander series)
  9. Slow Burn:
  10. The Finisher: David Baldacci (The Target)
  11. The Chase: Janet Evanovich (Top Secret Twenty-One)
  12. A Halflings (sic) Rescue: Heather Burch (One Lavender Ribbon)
  13. Obsessed: Deborah Bladon (Pulse)
  14. Letters to My Daughter: Maya Angelou (I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings)
  15. Quarry: Max Allan Collins (Supreme Justice)
  16. Grave Peril: Jim Butcher (The Dresden Files)
  17. Never Go Back: Lee Child (Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel)
  18. Deadline: John Sandford (Field of Prey)
  19. The Little Friend: Donna Tartt (The Goldfinch)
  20. The Mark of Athena: Rick Riordan (The Staff of Serapis)
  21. Three Wishes: Liane Moriarty (The Husband’s Secret)
  22. John Grisham’s The Partner: Jacqueline Kehl (Kehl performs audiobooks…I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is the most popular)
  23. Sharp Objects: Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl)
  24. 4 fer au feu: Maxine Pietro (Unlucky 13…co-author with James Patterson)
  25. The Racketeer: John Grisham (Sycamore Row)
  26. Hold On My Heart: Tracy Brogan (The Best Medicine)
  27. Happy Birthday to You!: Dr. Seuss (Oh, the Places You’ll Go!)
  28. Ring in the Dead: J.A. Jance (Second Watch)
  29. When We Met: Susan Mallery (Before We Kiss)
  30. The Death Cure: James Dashner (The Maze Runner)
  31. The Quiet Game: Greg Iles (Natchez  Burning)
  32. Where We Belong: Emily Giffin (The One and Only)
  33. The Eye of Heaven: Clive Cussler (Ghost Ship)
  34. Castle of Sand: Bella Forrest (A Shade of Vampire)
  35. The Atlantis Gene: A.G. Riddle (The Atlantis World)
  36. Steelheart: Brandon Sanderson (Words of Radiance)
  37. The Elite: Kiera Cass (The One)
  38. I Want to Hold Your Hand: Marie Force (True North)
  39. The Way Life Should Be: Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
  40. Catching Fire: Suzanne Collins (Mockingjay…these are both in The Hunger Games series)
  41. A Dark Mind: Theresa Ragan (Abducted)
  42. White Lace and Promises: Debbie Macomber (Promise Me Forever)
  43. The Proposition 3: H.M. Ward (The Wedding Contract)
  44. Club Prive Book 4: M.S. Parker (Club Prive Book 5)
  45. X-Men: Messiah Complex: Peter David (Artful)
  46. Heart Stealers (well, this is  embarrassing, but it’s one of these four: Patricia McLinn, Judith Arnold, Julie Ortolon and Kathryn Shay
  47. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone)
  48. The Black Box: Michael Connelly (The Gods of Guilt)
  49. Surrender: Melody Anne (Unexpected Treasure)
  50. A Tap on the Window: Linwood Barclay
  51. The Snake Handler: Anthony Doerr (All the Light We Cannot See)
  52. FaceOff: Steve Berry (The Lincoln Myth)
  53. Earth Awakens: Orson Scott Card (Ender’s Game)
  54. This Regret: Victoria Ashley (Slade)
  55. Shadow Kiss: Rachel Mead (Vampire Academy)
  56. Clockwork Angel: Cassandra Clare (City of Bones…these are in the The Mortal Instruments series)
  57. The Chance: Robyn Carr (Four Friends)
  58. Thankless in Death: J.D. Robb (Festive in Death)
  59. Deeply Odd: Dean Koontz (The City)
  60. Wonder: R.J. Palacio (The Julian Chapter)
  61. A Kiss of Shadows: Laurell K. Hamilton (A Shiver of Light)
  62. Just One Day: Gayle Forman (If I Stay)
  63. Innocent Blood: James Rollins (The Eye of God)
  64. Beyond Desire: J.S. Scott (Mine for Tonight)
  65. The Last Letter from Your Lover: Jojo Moyes (Me Before You)
  66. I Am the Messenger: Marcus Zusak (The Book Thief
  67. La ladrona de libros: Marcus Zusak (The Book Thief…listed twice)
  68. The Great Divide: C.S. Lewis (The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe)
  69. The Economies of Rising Inequalities: Thomas Piketty (Capital in the Twenty-First Century)
  70. Magic Tree House #52: Mary Pope Osborne (Magic Tree House Boxed Set 1-4)
  71. Reaper’s Legacy: Joanna Wylde (Devil’s Game)
  72. When the Heart Waits: Sue Monk Kidd (The Invention of Wings)
  73. Autumn in the Vineyard: Marina Adair (From the Moment We Met)
  74. Gone for Good: Harlan Coben (Missing You)
  75. Killing Lincoln: Bill O’Reilly (Killing Jesus)
  76. Killing Patton Martin Dugard (Killing Jesus)
  77. Hidden Order: Brad Thor (Act of War)
  78. Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends (only one book listed): William Guarnere
  79. Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends (only one book listed) (co-author): Edward Heffron
  80. The Lost Symbol: Dan Brown (Inferno)
  81. The Cold Truth: Jonathan Stone (Moving Day)
  82. The Longest Ride: Nicholas Sparks (The Best of Me)
  83. Night Shift: ?
  84. King for a Day: Mimi Jean Pamfiloff (King’s)
  85. When Day Breaks: Mary Jane Clark?
  86. A Tragic Wreck: T.K. Leigh
  87. Dark Wolf: Christine Feehan (Air Bound)
  88. Good Omens: Neil Gaiman (The Ocean at the End of the Lane)
  89. SuperFreakonomics: Stephen J. Dubner (Think Like a Freak)
  90. SuperFreakonomics (co-author): Steven D. Levitt (Think Like a Freak)
  91. Maid of Murder: Amanda Flower (A Plain Scandal)
  92. The Back Road: Rachel Abbott (Sleep Tight)
  93. First Sight: Danielle Steel (A Perfect Life)
  94. Living History: Hillary Rodham Clinton (Hard Choices)
  95. Cockroaches: Jo Nesbo
  96. Out of Breath: Rebecca Donovan? (Reason to Breath?)
  97. The Great Hunt: Robert Jordan (A Memory of Light)
  98. David and Goliath: Malcolm Gladwell (The Tipping Point?)
  99. Other People We Married: Emma Straub (The Vacationers)
  100. Doggies: Sandra Boynton (The Going to Bed Book)

Well, apologies are in order! I didn’t preserve the answers when I was working off the list at Amazon (I have a complicating factor right now, which may be resolved soon), and it changed…a lot! I should have anticipated that, since they do it hourly and rankings must change.

That meant I just spent a considerable amount of time researching them again…and couldn’t be sure on some of them.

I’ve never had that issue on a game before, but I do think you’ll have a pretty good idea how you did…

Lesson learned. :(

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

My new free Flipboard magazine, The Weird Old Days features vintage articles on ghosts, sea serpents, psychic phenomena, and more http://flip.it/ZtmYw

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Their other books

June 9, 2014

Their other books

Amazon has an interesting

Amazon Author Rank (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

page (it says it is in beta…test mode) where they rank their most popular authors (and update it hourly).

I thought I’d make a game out of this!

I’m going to give you one of the books that the author wrote…but not that author’s most popular book. It will be one of the more popular ones, though (top four)…that’s the easiest way to do this (and it keeps me from going deliberately obscure).

I’m doing these in order: the most popular author wrote the number one book on this list.

Without looking it up, let’s see how many authors you can identify…

  1. Looking for Alaska
  2. Revival
  3. Insurgent
  4. A Feast for Crows
  5. Middle School: Get Me out of Here!
  6. Dark Witch
  7. City of Lost Souls
  8. The Space Between
  9. Slow Burn
  10. The Finisher
  11. The Chase
  12. A Halflings (sic) Rescue
  13. Obsessed
  14. Letters to My Daughter
  15. Quarry
  16. Grave Peril
  17. Never Go Back
  18. Deadline
  19. The Little Friend
  20. The Mark of Athena
  21. Three Wishes
  22. John Grisham’s The Partner
  23. Sharp Objects
  24. 4 fer au feu
  25. The Racketeer
  26. Hold On My Heart
  27. Happy Birthday to You!
  28. Ring in the Dead
  29. When We Met
  30. The Death Cure
  31. The Quiet Game
  32. Where We Belong
  33. The Eye of Heaven
  34. Castle of Sand
  35. The Atlantis Gene
  36. Steelheart
  37. The Elite
  38. I Want to Hold Your Hand
  39. The Way Life Should Be
  40. Catching Fire
  41. A Dark Mind
  42. White Lace and Promises
  43. The Proposition 3
  44. Club Prive Book 4
  45. X-Men: Messiah Complex
  46. Heart Stealers
  47. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  48. The Black Box
  49. Surrender
  50. A Tap on the Window
  51. The Snake Handler
  52. FaceOff
  53. Earth Awakens
  54. This Regret
  55. Shadow Kiss
  56. Clockwork Angel
  57. The Chance
  58. Thankless in Death
  59. Deeply Odd
  60. Wonder
  61. A Kiss of Shadows
  62. Just One Day
  63. Innocent Blood
  64. Beyond Desire
  65. The Last Letter from Your Lover
  66. I Am the Messenger
  67. La ladrona de libros
  68. The Great Divide
  69. The Economies of Rising Inequalities
  70. Magic Tree House Boxed Set #52
  71. Reaper’s Legacy
  72. When the Heart Waits
  73. Autumn in the Vineyard
  74. Gone for Good
  75. Killing Lincoln
  76. Killing Patton
  77. Hidden Order
  78. Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends (only one book listed)
  79. Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends (only one book listed) (co-author)
  80. The Lost Symbol
  81. The Cold Truth
  82. The Longest Ride
  83. Night Shift
  84. King for a Day
  85. When Day Breaks
  86. A Tragic Wreck
  87. Dark Wolf
  88. Good Omens
  89. SuperFreakonomics
  90. SuperFreakonomics (co-author)
  91. Maid of Murder
  92. The Back Road
  93. First Sight
  94. Living History
  95. Cockroaches
  96. Out of Breath
  97. The Great Hunt
  98. David and Goliath
  99. Other People We Married
  100. Doggies

Wow! That was a lot harder than I would have thought! I’m a former brick-and-mortar bookstore manager (although it’s been some time), and I would not have done well in this game. Better than a lot of people, I’m sure, but I don’t think I would have gotten twenty of these.

There are also some weird things in their algorithms: the same author may show up more than once, for example. I guess it’s reasonable that if there are co-authors, they show up separately. One person is listed as an author, but isn’t, exactly…

I’ll be curious to hear how many you got! I’m hoping this also leads you to some discovery of additional books to read.

Update: one of my regular readers and commenters, Lady Galaxy, correctly pointed out that I didn’t say I was going to give you the answers. :) I will…I’ll probably give it a couple of days.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

My new free Flipboard magazine, The Weird Old Days features vintage articles on ghosts, sea serpents, psychic phenomena, and more http://flip.it/ZtmYw

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

The Double Positive Game

May 18, 2014

The Double Positive Game

Sage: “Do you want to play a game?”

Casey: “Not really.”

Sage: “It’ll be fun!”

Casey: “Okay. I guess so.”

Sage: “It’s called the Double Positive Game. The last person who says something negative wins.”

Casey: “That’s a stupid game.”

Sage: “I win!”

Casey: “That’s not fair! I didn’t know we were playing yet…you cheated!”

Sage: “Ha! I win again!”

Casey: “Wait a minute, let’s start over.”

Sage: “Sure.”

Casey: “Are we playing now?”

Sage: “Yes.”

Casey: “You look good today.”

Sage: “Thanks! So do you!”

Casey: “Oh, I haven’t been able to get to the gym lately…I think I’m starting to look fat.”

Sage: “I win!”

Casey: “Why? I didn’t say anything negative about you!”

Sage: “The game doesn’t say it has to be about the other person…just something negative.”

Casey: “So, if I said it looked like it was going to rain, I’d lose?”

Sage: “That depends…”

Casey: “On what?”

Sage: “On whether or not rain is a good thing. If you were in a drought, that would be a positive.”

Casey: “I think this game is in a drought…a drought of fun.”

Sage: “I win!”

Casey: “Stop that! Hey, you keep calling me a loser…that’s pretty negative!”

Sage: “Actually, I’ve only called myself a winner…I haven’t said anything about you. You could be happy for me that I won, right?”

Casey: “That’s not how winning and losing works! The loser can’t be happy for the winner!”

Sage: “Why not?”

Casey: “Because then why would anybody try to win?!”

Sage: “So that you could both perform better than you have before?”

Casey: “Yeah, that’ll get people motivated…not! You’d make a lousy politician.”

(Sage just smiles)

Casey: “Aren’t you going to yell that ‘you won’ again?”

Sage: “Actually, Casey, I’m going to take that as a compliment…”

;)

The Double Positive Game is something I just invented. The name is a play on “double negatives”, and I’m hoping the post makes you smile…but I also hope you try playing it with people you know, especially on line. Feel free to spread it around. One note: the rule is that it is “the last person who says something negative” who wins. I wanted to phrase it in a positive manner, rather than determining who lost…so I wouldn’t say it as “the first person who says something negative loses”. Here’s hoping you have some very long lasting games! :)

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

6 free games (and 1 utility) for the Kindle Paperwhite

December 12, 2012

6 free games (and 1 utility) for the Kindle Paperwhite

There are lots of games and apps out there for the Kindle Fire line, but the RSKs (Reflective Screen Kindles…anything but a Fire at this point) also have them.

There are different versions for different models, which makes sense. You can’t have the same interface for a touchscreen device that you have for a keyboard device, for example.

I’ve reported from time to time on free games for older RSKs, but I hadn’t looked at the Kindle Paperwhite yet, so I thought I would.

There are six free games right now, and one utility (a practical “app”).

My Checklist

For comparison’s sake, there are twelve free games and apps for the Kindle Keyboard.

Grid Detective sounds like fun to me. I used to do puzzles like this…you are given a series of facts, and from that, you can deduce the answer to something. You know, “Ted is taller than Lu, who is shorter than Bob. Bob is not taller than Rose…” and so on.

I’ve tried Hamster Habitat on a different model…it was okay. Every Word has been very popular.

Obviously, if you mainly want to play games, a Fire gives you a lot more robust options, but you may find it fun to do something other than read on your Paperwhite as well. :)

Enjoy!

If you don’t have a Paperwhite, here’s a link to all of the

Kindle Active Content

You can click your model on your left of the screen. You can also check compatible models on the app/game’s Amazon product page.

If you have opinions about any of these, feel free to share them with me and my readers by commenting on this post.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

Answers to Read the movie: top five movies based on books

October 23, 2012

Answers to Read the movie: top five movies based on books

recently posted a game where I listed the top five USA domestic grossing movies based on books.

It’s interesting to me that books are not necessarily the best source for a movie (based on box office)…although comic books/graphic novels (which I did not include) did very well.

If you want to take a shot at guessing, go to the link above before reading these answers. :)

I’m going to do this in reverse order…I’ll start at number five and build up to number one. I think number one is not the first one you would come to mind when someone said, “movie based on book”.

Oh, one other observation: three of these are not the first movie in a series, but have a cinematic predecessor. In that sense, it may be that it those are in effect movies based on movies…that it still isn’t a book that is really driving the dogro (my term for “domestic gross”).

===

All time USA dogro #16

The author of the book on which this movie (the first in a series that will have its fourth installment in 2014) won a Prime time Emmy and a Hugo. The author co-wrote the script for this movie, and has directed movies (one of which spawned a sequel and a TV series).

Kindle edition

Answer: Jurassic Park

Michael Crichton wrote and directed Westworld, which had a sequel (Futureworld) and a TV series (Beyond Westworld). The latter did not get Crichton a Prime Time Emmy (no surprise to anyone who saw it) ;) ; that came for producing ER. Jurassic Park IV is expected in 2014.

This is a case where it is clearly a movie based on a book…yes, the special effects were undeniably part of it, and hey, you know, dinosaurs, but I think we can reasonably say that the readers of the book were part of the audience in a significant way.

===

All time USA dogro #14

A character in this movie appears in a 2012 movie (and that movie is part of a trilogy). That same character had previously been played by someone who guested on both The Joey Bishop Show and Late Night with David Letterman.

Kindle edition

Answer: Return of the King (from the Lord of the Rings trilogy)

I was having a tough time hiding this one. :) Absolutely a book driven series, although the last movie in a movie series’ audience is clearly also based on the previous movies). The character? Gollum, who appears in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. They are making three movies out of The Hobbit.

Brother Theodore voiced Gollum, and had talk show appearances (including many on David Letterman).

===

All time USA dogro #12

This is the eighth (and final) movie in a series…the movie tagline was, “It all ends here.” Until they were released as e-books, they were one of the most requested.

Kindle edition

Answer: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (the movie is part 2). Again, I wasn’t sure how not to make this one obvious. Again, I’d clearly credit the book’s audience for part of the success.

===

All time USA dogro #9

One of the three movies this year to break $400 million dogro, this is the first movie in a series. Four movies are planned in the series, based on three books. The book was not published by one of the Big Six US trade publishers, and is available in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library

Kindle edition

Answer: The Hunger Games

Book driven audience? Absolutely! It’s worth noting that this is not a sequel. The top ten has other non-sequels (Star Wars, Avatar), although those two aren’t based on books.

===

All time USA dogro #6

This is the first sequel (second movie) of four full-length movies, and there was another successful full-length movie spin-off.  It is the most successful movie in the series. Performers include a member of Monty Python, a talk show host, and Larry King.

(not available as a Kindle book, although it is available as an audiobook in the Kindle store)

Answer: Shrek 2

Shrek was first a book by William Steig, a Newberry and Caldecott honoree. My guess is that the book may not have been a big factor in this movie’s success (and I’m not sure how much it was in the first movie’s success, but it’s possible it contributed).

===

Oh, and adjusted for inflation, the biggest dogroing movie to date (by far)? Gone with the Wind. Of course, it has had re-releases as well. I’m not linking to the Kindle store book, because it blocks text-to-speech access.

There you go! Oh, I just thought of something…one might argue that Shrek is based on a “graphic novel”, I suppose, although it’s really more of a picture book. If that’s the case, the next one down would be The Two Towers at #18.

Thanks to Edward Boyhan for guessing…and all of your guesses were right! :)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

Read the movie: top five movies based on books

October 20, 2012

Read the movie: top five movies based on books

This has been a great year for the movie box office, and it’s going to get better.

As the top two movies (so far) show, comic books are a great source for successful movies (The Avengers, The Dark Knight Rises).

The third movie, though, is based on a book (I’ll explain why I’m not naming it shortly)…and has broken $400 million in domestic gross (what I call “dogro”) in the USA.

That got me curious: what have been the most successful movies based on books?

I’m using an

IMDb search

as my authority for the box office (it’s a very reliable movie site, in my experience…owned by Amazon).

I’m only basing this on USA dogro.

I’m counting a movie as being based on a book (not a comic book or graphic novel) if the author of the book gets a credit, and the book was published and written before the screenplay. In some cases, a novelization may be released before the movie, but be based on the movie; I’m not going to count those.

I will count a movie which is a sequel to a movie based on a book…but those will typically still credit the book’s author.

I’m going to make this a game by not giving you the name of the book, but clues to it, so you can guess. :) I think this may be pretty easy…after all, these are popular movies. ;) I’ll link to the book: don’t click on the link until you’ve guessed, if you want to see how you do.

All time USA dogro #6

This is the first sequel (second movie) of four full-length movies, and there was another successful full-length movie spin-off.  It is the most successful movie in the series. Performers include a member of Monty Python, a talk show host, and Larry King.

(not available as a Kindle book, although it is available as an audiobook in the Kindle store)

All time USA dogro #9

One of the three movies this year to break $400 million dogro, this is the first movie in a series. Four movies are planned in the series, based on three books. The book was not published by one of the Big Six US trade publishers, and is available in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library

Kindle edition

All time USA dogro #12

This is the eighth (and final) movie in a series…the movie tagline was, “It all ends here.” Until they were released as e-books, they were one of the most requested.

Kindle edition

All time USA dogro #14

A character in this movie appears in a 2012 movie (and that movie is part of a trilogy). That same character had previously been played by someone who guested on both The Joey Bishop Show and Late Night with David Letterman.

Kindle edition

All time USA dogro #14

The author of the book on which this movie (the first in a series that will have its fourth installment in 2014) won a Prime time Emmy and a Hugo. The author co-wrote the script for this movie, and has directed movies (one of which spawned a sequel and a TV series).

Kindle edition

Well, there you go. :) I’ve tried to make the clues a bit difficult, but my guess is that quite a few of you will get all five…we’ll see, though. Being based on a book is certainly not a guarantee of blockbuster box office (hello, John Carter), but it can be done. Adjusted for inflation, the biggest box office of all time (by far) goes to a movie based on a book. I’ll give you the title of that one and the five above soon. Have fun guessing!

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

My answers to How Many Kindles #1

April 21, 2012

My answers to How Many Kindles #1

A few days ago, I posted a game where I gave you a statement and asked you for how many Kindle models that statement was true:

http://ilmk.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/how-many-kindles-1/

If you want to try the game yourself, go there first, then come back here for the answers. :)

This is how I defined the Kindles:

===

Count all of the variants of one of these as one model..wi-fi only/wi-fi and 3G, Special Offers or not, international or US only.

===

I’m also careful to say here that we might disagree on the answers…I tend to go with the mainstream sort of answer, while everything might be possible if you hacked a Kindle. ;) I’ll give you some of my logic to justify my answers, but I’m happy to have you challenge them in comments to this post.

I’m going to include the percentages of respondents…that’s part of what interests me when I do these things. I also figure that if you gave an answer that matches mine, and many people didn’t, it might make you feel smarter and/or more educated. I’m not saying that in and of itself should make you feel better, of course…but it does tend to do that. ;)

You may also learn something here that will help you…I always like that.

Question 1:

How many Kindles have been in the market for more than five years?

0] 39.87%  (63 votes)  (my answer) (group answer)
1] 27.85%  (44 votes)
2] 12.03%  (19 votes)
3] 10.76%  (17 votes)
4] 1.9%  (3 votes)
5] 0%  (0 votes)
6] 0.63%  (1 votes)
7] 6.96%  (11 votes)

Total Votes: 158

My answer on this: zero.

The Kindle 1 was announced on November 19, 2007, and I was asking these questions on April 18, 2012…not yet five years.

Question 2:

How many Kindles have text-to-speech?

0] 0%  (0 votes)
1] 3.97%  (5 votes)
2] 6.35%  (8 votes)
3] 14.29%  (18 votes)
4] 24.6%  (31 votes) (group answer)
5] 23.02%  (29 votes)  (my answer)
6] 23.81%  (30 votes)
7] 3.97%  (5 votes)

Total Votes: 126

My answer: five. The Kindle 1 doesn’t have it, and the Mindle doesn’t have it…it doesn’t even have speakers. The rest of them have it: including the Kindle Fire. The Kindle Fire’s Pico TTS engine doesn’t work with Kindle store books, but I use it pretty much every workday with text files from Project Gutenberg. Yes, you do need to download another app, but you can use a free app from the Amazon Appstore.

Question 3:

How many Kindles can be ordered new from Amazon.co.uk?

0] 1.92%  (2 votes)
1] 3.85%  (4 votes)
2] 24.04%  (25 votes)
3] 28.85%  (30 votes)  (my answer) (group answer)
4] 17.31%  (18 votes)
5] 9.62%  (10 votes)
6] 8.65%  (9 votes)
7 5.77%  (6 votes)

Total Votes: 104

This one interested me, and yes, I had to check. :) It’s the Mindle, the Kindle Touch, and the Kindle Keyboard. I could not find them carrying the Kindle DX as a new product.

Question 4:

How many Kindles can do landscape mode?

0] 0%  (0 votes)
1] 3.96%  (4 votes)
2] 4.95%  (5 votes)
3] 8.91%  (9 votes)
4] 9.9%  (10 votes)
5] 19.8%  (20 votes)
6] 22.77%  (23 votes)
7] 29.7%  (30 votes)  (my answer) (group answer)

Total Votes: 101

This number just recently changed with the update to the Kindle Touch, which gave it landscape.

Question 5:

How many Kindles have a touchscreen?

0] 0%  (0 votes)
1] 8.49% (9 votes)
2] 71.7%  (76 votes)  (my answer) (group answer)
3] 16.98%  (18 votes)
4] 1.89%  (2 votes)
5] 0.94%  (1 votes)
6] 0%  (0 votes)
7] 0%  (0 votes)

Total Votes: 106

The group was confident on this one: two. That’s the Kindle Fire and the Kindle Touch.

Question 6:

How many Kindles can hold thousands of books?

0] 0%  (0 votes)
1] 0.88%  (1 votes)
2] 1.77%  (2 votes)
3] 2.65%  (3 votes)
4] 4.42%  (5 votes) (my answer)
5] 4.42%  (5 votes)
6] 15.93%  (18 votes)
7] 69.91%  (79 votes) (group answer)

Total Votes: 113

Not the Mindle: that only says 1,400.  Not the Kindle 1: that was 200. Not the Kindle 2: that was 1,500. My answer is four: the Kindle Keyboard (3,500); Kindle Touch (3,000); Kindle DX (3,000); and Kindle Fire (6,000). Tuxgirl, one of my frequent readers and commenters, asked if I was including the SD card storage for the Kindle 1. I wasn’t…those books aren’t stored on the Kindle. You could carry around ten SD cards if you wanted. You could also use a wi-fi drive with the Fire: i wasn’t counting that. If you did count the SD card for the Kindle 1, I could see that argument…if that’s why you said five, you can give yourself credit. :)

Question 7:

How many Kindles can use KF8 (Kindle Format 8) files?

0] 7.45%  (7 votes)
1] 18.09%  (17 votes)
2] 25.53%  (24 votes)  (my answer) (group answer)
3] 15.96%  (15 votes)
4] 12.77%  (12 votes)
5] 3.19%  (3 votes)
6] 6.38%  (6 votes)
7] 10.64%  (10 votes)

Total Votes: 94

Kindle Format 8 is a new format from Amazon, and it’s available on the Kindle Fire…and recently added to the Kindle Touch with an update. That makes two.

Question 8:

How many Kindles have audible menus?

0] 8.7%  (8 votes)
1] 13.04%  (12 votes) (my answer)
2] 25%  (23 votes)
3] 27.17%  (25 votes) (group answer)
4] 8.7%  (8 votes)
5] 6.52%  (6 votes)
6] 5.43%  (5 votes)
7] 5.43%  (5 votes)

Total Votes: 92

Surprisingly to me, this is only on the Kindle Keyboard. I’m quite surprised that it doesn’t appear to be on the Fire, and why not on the Touch? In December 2009, there were many news stories suggesting this was coming to the Kindle DX and the Kindle 2…but when the Kindle Keyboard/3 came out in July of 2010, that’s when and how we got it.

Question 9:

How many Kindles can play Minesweeper?

0] 1.1%  (1 votes)
1] 6.59%  (6 votes)
2] 14.29%  (13 votes)
3] 8.79%  (8 votes)
4] 7.69%  (7 votes)
5] 15.38%  (14 votes)
6] 21.98%  (20 votes)  (my answer)
7] 24.18%  (22 votes) (group answer)

Total Votes: 91

Yes, even the Kindle 1 could play Minesweeper. The one that’s missing it? The Kindle Touch…

Question 10:

How many Kindles has Bufo owned?

0] 0%  (0 votes)
1] 0%  (0 votes)
2] 0%  (0 votes)
3] 2%  (2 votes)
4] 5%  (5 votes)
5] 13%  (13 votes)
6] 21%  (21 votes) (my answer)
7] 59%  (59 votes) (group answer)

Total Votes: 100

I’ve owned six models. The only one I haven’t had is the Kindle DX.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

How many Kindles #1

April 17, 2012

How many Kindles #1

We haven’t played a game like this in a while. :)

I’m going to count each of these as a Kindle:

Count all of the variants of one of these as one model..wi-fi only/wi-fi and 3G, Special Offers or not, international or US only.

So, the highest answer you can have is seven.

The lowest number is zero. :)

You’ll be more likely to match my answer if you go with the standard, unhacked, mainstream Kindle…not a tricky answer. For example, the answer to “How many Kindles can go faster than the speed of sound?’ is going to match me by saying, “Zero”…even though they could all do it in a jet fighter. :)

Okay, here we go…I’ll give you my answers in the next few days. Oh, and I’d prefer that you don’t look things up: I’m curious about the impressions people have.

Remember, even on this last one (included for regular readers), it’s the number of models…I’ve had more than one of some of these. :)

Hope you had fun!

Update: my answers are in this post.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

Answers to For Presidents’ Day: consider the alternatives

February 27, 2012

Answers to For Presidents’ Day: consider the alternatives

For Presidents’ Day, a week ago, I posted a little quiz about fictional places that don’t have a President, but have a very different system of government. I said to give yourself credit if you knew what the place was (or who the author is…these places may cover more than one book) even if you couldn’t name it.

Here, then, are the questions and answers.

Place #1

In this society, you move up by killing people above your rank and “taking their metal”. You can’t just poison them or ambush them, though…this isn’t 16th Century Italy. :)

They have to attack you first, so you kill them in self-defense, or the entire ruling council as to decide that you should fight. You can ask for that…that puts a check on a high-ranking person just never attacking anybody.

This society does have a lot of cultural rules: males don’t kill females…or vice versa, and prisoners aren’t killed (but may have “worse” things done to them).

Answer #1: The Barsoom series by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Specifically, this is the society of the green Martians, the Tharks. If you haven’t read A Princess of Mars and want to do so before the new movie (which is a major release) comes out, you have until March 9th in the USA. :)  Clearly, this system limits the type of person who will become a leader (Can’t fight? Can’t lead) but does, at least, base advancement purely on ability. It doesn’t matter who you are or what your background is, if you can accomplish the goal, you advance. Well, except for that gender issue…since only males are leaders and females don’t kill males, women can’t really become leaders.

Place #2

This place has a beloved leader, ranked over all others (and there are many at lower levels). There are challenges and clear aggressive action against the land, but this ruler is basically a pacifist. That doesn’t mean steps won’t be taken by this administration to remedy evil deeds. The ruler is aided in that by a powerful magic user…and the ruler has forbidden the use of magic except by two people.

The land, under the guidance of the ruler, is basically socialist in concept…there used to be money, but it isn’t used any more. However, some people certainly have wealth. That happens in part because the land is so separated, with considerable geographical challenges…some small areas have never even heard of the central ruler.

Answer #2: The Oz series by L. Frank Baum

If you’ve only seen the 1939 Judy Garland movie, you might think this ruler is Glinda, the good witch. While the witch of the South (not the North, as it was changed for MGM’s version) is powerful, she is secondary in the series to Princess Ozma.

Ozma rules by right of inheritance…she is the daughter of the former king (although it’s more complicated…not too surprising in a magical land).

That said, her subjects who know her love her…for the most part. She is kidnapped and threatened in other ways in the books: that’s one place having a powerful sorceress as an adviser comes in handy.

Ozma is generally loving and fair, and makes some interesting strategic choices. The other person (besides Glinda) allowed to practice magic? The Wizard…

Ozma first appears in The Marvelous Land of Oz.

Place #3

While perhaps not a ruler in the formal sense, this character has absolute dominion over the land, and must be obeyed. Over 2,000 years old and ruthless, the ruler had come to this place because of a process that provides immortality. The ruler commands magic, but overwhelming attractiveness may be the despot’s greatest power.

Answer #3: The Amahagger people in Africa in the Ayesha series by H. Rider Haggard

There are clear reasons why “She” (Ayesha AKA Hiya) is called She-who-must-be-obeyed.

Like Glinda, she is a powerful magic-user…unlike Glinda, she is ruthless. She took power: it wasn’t given to her. Within the society, no one can challenge her…and it’s possible she’ll live forever.

Not much chance for a member of the community to rule…even surviving is at the whim of “She”.

Ayesha first appears in She.

Well, there you have three fictional alternatives to the US political system. Countless people have imagined living in Oz, traveling to Barsoom…and avoiding Ayesha. ;)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.


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