Archive for the ‘Recommendations’ Category

Binge reading with Kindle Unlimited #1

July 27, 2014

Binge reading with Kindle Unlimited #1

While “binge watching” entire TV series may be all the rage, serious readers have been “binge reading” for decades.

Many of us have picked a series and just plowed through them, start to finish.

How many of you had a “Summer of Sherlock”, where you decided you’d read all the original Sherlock Holmes books?

No?

Gee, where else were you during the summer…on the beach? ;)

I once read three and a half novels in the same series in one day…that’s my record, by the way. ;)

It was

The Expendables by Richard Avery (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) (not available for the Kindle)

I’m not going to pretend that they were “thick” reading (like War and Peace or The Lord of the Rings): they are definitely “popcorn books”, plain and simple. They are meant to be snacks…finish one, on to the next, like a bag of potato chips. :)

However, I’ve also read much more serious books…and again, right through the series.

Generally, I don’t want to start a series unless I have access to all of them, and I can start at the beginning.

In the past, that has been challenging, though.

For one thing, it could be a big investment before I even knew if I liked it.

Let’s say a series had ten books in it, and I could get the paperbacks for $5 each. I’d have to invest $50 before I’d even start reading the first one.

Well, okay, I can’t say I’d really go that far all the time. :) I often would read the first book in the series first…and then, if I decided to go for it, buy the other nine.

So, only $45 at a time. ;)

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

changes those calculations.

I don’t have to worry about how much each book in the series costs.

I can choose to read a series, and go for it.

Yes, you can only have ten books out at a time, but unless you are going somewhere where you won’t have access to the internet (even without wireless, you can typically use a computer to download books from Amazon and then transfer them via USB), that’s not a problem. You just keep returning books as you finish them and you can keep taking more out.

There is the risk that you are part way through a series and the other books get removed from Kindle Unlimited…books are going to come in and out of it. If there’s a series where Amazon is the publisher now, that doesn’t mean that they will be later…licensing can change hands.

Still, I don’t think that’s a huge risk.

I thought I’d give you some suggestions for binge reading.

One fun thing: for $9.99 a month (and free for the first month right now), you could race other people on the account. ;) Typically, a book can be on six devices on the account at the same time, at no additional cost. If a book does have a different number of “simultaneous device licenses”, it will say so on the book’s Amazon product page…none of that changes with KU.

However, you can’t return the first book in the series until everyone is done with it, or they won’t be able to finish it. So, if the fastest person reads more than ten times faster than the slowest person, the speedy one will have to wait until that slower one finishes the first book. Of course, you could always buy it…that’s going to happen with some KU books.

Let’s look at some of these series (and other groupings)!

Blow your mind with Philip K. Dick

I can’t imagine what it would be like if you read ten PKD books in a row! I have to believe that virtually everyone would come out of that changed. Reality can be so warped in these…many people struggle to get through one. That’s not because the writing is bad, but because you put yourself in someone else’s head when you read, and PKD’s is like that feeling you get on the teacup ride at Disneyland. ;)

Search for PKD in KU (at AmazonSmile)

That search has 63 results, although some are false positives (they aren’t really PKD). They also don’t have all the books. I’d say try these first:

  • Valis
  • The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch
  • Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said
  • Total Recall
  • We Can Build You

From there, you can just keep going. :)

Harry Potter

If you haven’t read Harry Potter, here’s a great opportunity! We paid more than $9.99 for each book when they were released. You could borrow them one a month through the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, but wouldn’t it be fun to read all of the original seven on a week’s vacation?

Search for Harry Potter in KU (at AmazonSmile)

What if you have already read them?

That’s where KU really works!

There are 154 results in that search! Again, some are false positives, but there is a whole series of interactive quiz books, Harry Potter cookbooks, parodies, analyses…you might never buy a book on the sociology of Harry Potter, or the “magickal spirituality”, but at this “smorgasbook”, you can just toss them on your plate. Would you buy a book on how to host a Harry Potter party? Maybe not, but you could borrow one from KU if the event is on your calendar.

87th Precinct

Do you really want to disappear into another world for awhile?

You can read more than forty books in the classic series by Ed McBain:

Search for 87th Precinct in KU (at Amazon Smile)

Maybe you aren’t going read them all at once. :) Maybe you read them on your public transit commute (or listen to them in the car…that’s what I do). If you get through one book a week that way, you could commute to work and to the 87th Precinct at the same time…for the best part of a year.

Learn something new with lots of perspectives

Something else you can do with KU is pick a non-fiction topic, and read and discard books as soon as you want. Sure, you could do something like that with free samples, but what if the part you want to learn isn’t in the first ten percent (or so) of the book?

For example, suppose you want to publish your own book in the Kindle store (or elsewhere). There are hundreds of results in this

Search for publish your book in KU (at AmazonSmile)

If all you want to know about is how to promote a book by going to conventions, you can hop and skip from book to book.

I definitely plan to give you more suggestions for binge reading in Kindle Unlimited in the future, but let me also ask you: what would you recommend to me and my readers? I tend to read several books at the same time (those wouldn’t be books in the same fiction series), but I love to find series that can be in that mix. Feel free to make your recommendations known by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Better than the book? Planet of the Apes

July 12, 2014

Better than the book? Planet of the Apes

I’m about to head out with my Significant Other to see

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

the second movie in the second reboot of the movie series (there have also been a live action TV series and an animated series).

Am I a Planet of the Apes (PotA) fan?

Does watching all five movies of the first series in a row in a movie theatre count? ;) Let me take that one step further…I did that…in an ape suit (with a Don Post mask).

I started writing a script (completely unsolicited) for the live action series, although it was canceled before I was finished. My script focused on a stereotype-busting intellectual gorilla…

However, it all started with a French novel:

Planet of the Apes (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

The novel was published in 1963, and was followed five years later by the Roddy McDowell/Charlton Heston version which was most Americans first encounter with it (at least back then):

Planet Of The Apes (at AmazonSmile)

That version, by the way, is available at no additional cost as Prime streaming…along with its four direct sequels! Good way to have a good binge watch. ;)

Generally, people tend to think that a book is better than the adaptation of it, and that’s often the case. Part of it just has to do with the nature of the two media: you can put a lot more into a book than you can into a movie, and the special effects are largely unlimited. ;)

This is the rare one, though, where I would submit that the movie (the 1968 version) is better.

It’s not just a question of the translation (I thought the translation I read was quite good).

There are a lot of similarities between the movie and the book…it’s clearly based on it, even with some of the same characters (down to their names).

As regular readers know, I’m very careful about spoilers…and spoiling the 1968 PotA movies is one of the great offenses in that area, in my opinion (along with Psycho, The Sixth Sense…I would argue, even the 1939 Wizard of Oz).

I was not happy recently when a journalist did just that: spoiled PotA, and unnecessarily, in my opinion. They could have left five words out of their piece, and been fine.

The key thing here is that the book and the movie are…different in their ideas (and in their tones). The book is far more philosophical: it’s not intended to read as reality.

The movie is gritty. We are supposed to think it could be happening (given the willing suspension of disbelief about the premise)…that it could be real.

I’ll recommend the book to you: I do think it is worth reading, and it’s only $5.43 at time of writing.

However, I’m also going to recommend the 1968 movie to you…and I feel more confident that most people will enjoy the latter.

One reason for that may be that Rod Serling, of the original Twilight Zone series, co-wrote the script.

As to the other movies in the first series? Well, there’s a whole through story that’s quite interesting, and there are some notable scenes in all of them (one, in particular, has something to say about celebrity culture). Roddy McDowell is brilliant in all of them. :)

I think, though, they do belong squarely in the geek zone (which is where I live)…non-geeks are just not going to enjoy them as much. ;)

What do you think? Are you a PotA fan? What was your first exposure to it? Was it the Tim Burton version? Are there other movies which you think were better than their source material? Feel free to let me and my readers know what you think by commenting on this post…but no spoilers, please. :)

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Books priced at $20.14

June 25, 2014

Books priced at $20.14

The e-book business leads to some weird pricing.

When I managed a brick-and-mortar bookstore, books tended to have prices which ended in ninety-nine, ninety-eight, ninety-five, zero, or maybe fifty.

As a general rule in retail, a price ending in ninety-nine is perceived as a bargain, a price ending in two zeroes (an even dollar amount) is perceived as a quality, prestige item.

I would never have priced a $500 chess set at $499.99…it wouldn’t have sold. Anybody willing to pay that much for a chess set (oh, I managed a game store, too…this wasn’t in the book store) doesn’t want a bargain.

With e-books, though, and actually with other products, too, we see all sorts of price points.

Why? Has the psychology changed?

Well, in a sense. It isn’t human psychology, it’s likely to be robot psychology…algorithms.

An algorithm is sort of a flow chart that takes you through a set of choices…you don’t improvise at decision points, you follow a rule.

You might want to set an algorithm that makes a give e-book at your store one penny less than the lowest competitor’s price.

You can see how that could make for weird prices.

You price it for $10.

Your competitor prices it at $9.99.

Your computer notices that, and drops it to $9.98.

Your competitor’s computer notices, and drops it to $9.97…and so on.

You could have a floor on how low it would go, but before it got there, we could get these odd prices.

I’m always looking for new ways to discover books…something which is out of the box may do that for me.

This time, since it is the year 2014, I thought I’d see if any e-books in the Kindle store were priced at $20.14.

There were!

$20.14 books in the USA Kindle store (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping)

There were 25 results.

The first thing I noticed is that some of the books are available to rent. I wonder if that’s part of the algorithm…if the rental price is a certain percentage of the purchase price, but it is the former that drives the latter. In other words, they say, “We want the rental price of this to be $9.75, and that has to be 25% of the purchase price, so the purchase price goes to $39.00.”

I don’t know that, I’m just speculating. :)

Here are ten of the titles:

  • Religious Violence in Contemporary Japan: The Case of Aum Shinrikyo (NIAS Monographs) by Ian Reader
  • Drug War Heresies: Learning from Other Vices, Times, and Places (RAND Studies in Policy Analysis) by Robert J. MacCoun
  • CNC Machining Handbook: Building, Programming, and Implementation by Alan Overby
  • Creating East and West: Renaissance Humanists and the Ottoman Turks by Nancy Bisaha
  • Treating Bulimia in Adolescents: A Family-Based Approach by Daniel Le Grange and James Lock
  • Teaching Literacy in Third Grade (Tools for Teaching Literacy) by Janice F. Almasi
  • Lezioni di sociologia storica (Collezione di testi e di studi) (Italian Edition) by Massimo Paci
  • Exchange-Traded Funds For Dummies by Colin Davidson and Russell Wild
  • Winnicott na Escola de São Paulo (Portuguese Edition) by Elsa Oliveira Dias and Loparic Zeljko
  • Mary Wollstonecraft: Mother of Women’s Rights (Oxford Portraits) by Miriam Brody

I think I can be pretty confident there that there are some books you didn’t know were available. :) It also tends to refute the idea that e-books are just popular, genre titles. That does tend to be the majority, I think, but lots of things are covered.

The genre thing was true of mass market paperbacks in the beginning, too.

What happens is that it is hard to lure the brand name authors into a new format. Their agents don’t know what the market possibilities are, so they don’t know what kind of deal to negotiate.

They may just stay out of it for a while, until they can see what is going to happen. That happened with e-books…we are “missing” a lot fewer titles than we used to be.

Without brand names, how are you going to sell the books?

Genres.

It’s a way for the reader to be able to predict something about the content, even if that something is quality. ;) There are some people who will are willing to read any vampire book, or romance, or mystery. They may have preferences, but they like the topic more than the author.

I’m often surprised when people I consider to be serious readers can’t tell me who wrote the book they are currently reading.

I’m big on knowing who the authors are, and crediting them…you may have noticed I tend to do that with news story links, as well.

At any rate, the smaller market nature of these titles is an indicator that the e-book market has matured past that early genre heavy stage.

The Mary Wollstonecraft one intrigues me…

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Judge a book by its jury

June 18, 2014

Judge a book by its jury

I’ve been on three juries in the past ten years.

That’s right…not just being called to jury duty, but actually serving on juries.

My most recent trial just finished today. That’s why I mentioned to a couple of you that I had an open-ended commitment that was taking up a lot of my time (and concentration). You don’t know how long they’ll go: I showed up for jury duty on this one on May 28th.

Being on a jury isn’t easy. In my case, my day job has good benefits, and I get my normal pay (that’s not true of everybody on every jury). It’s not about that for me.

On the previous trial (in 2010), my Significant Other said it was like I had PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). I had nightmares, and didn’t sleep well. It was a really bad case.

You listen to sometimes horrifying testimony. In that case, the perpetrator (there was a conviction) was also really glaring at us throughout the trial.

The hardest part about it is that you can’t talk to anybody about it. That’s not to say that talking to someone is more important than the work of the trial, but that’s a really big coping mechanism taken away from you. I’m used to talking to my SO about everything…so you have to picture being in this really stressful situation, and not being able to discuss it.

All three of my cases have involved serious, serious crimes…and the last two have had child victims.

I was surprised, though, when my adult child said, “You hate jury duty.”

I don’t.

I actually am trying to get on the jury.

Most people are trying to get excused…why do I want to serve?

I think it’s the most important thing someone in my position can do for the community…and I think I’m good at it.

Don’t get me wrong…lots of other people are good at it, too. Not everybody, though…and that includes people who actually serve.

I was part of a terrific jury this time. We had very different backgrounds, and even different approaches. However, we all took it very seriously, listened to each other, went over the evidence, asked the judge questions, and eventually, unanimously decided on all counts (we deliberated on multiple days).

I think a good jury knows that each of them have individual prejudices…and is able to decide based on the law as instructed. At its heart, a jury stands between the accused and the state (at least in the USA). A defendant comes into the trial “presumed innocent”…they don’t have to do anything at all. Hypothetically, the defense could choose to call no witnesses…they don’t need to present a case. The state has the “burden of proof”…if  you are on a jury and you believe that the person committed the crimes as charged, but the District Attorney (or other prosecuting attorney) didn’t prove it, you have to find the defendant not guilty (which should read “not proven guilty” in my opinion).

However, if you believe that the state did prove its case “beyond a reasonable doubt” (that’s the burden in criminal cases…and it’s not beyond all possible doubt, just reasonable doubt), then you must find the accused guilty. Regardless of what you think of the law or the punishment, that’s what your responsibility is.

I had a good illustration of “reasonable doubt” today. When I got up this morning, my work iPhone was on the couch. It was in a place where the dog puts things (yes, we let the dogs on the couch) quite often. Now, it is possible that someone snuck in the house and moved my iPhone (it was on a part of the couch where I don’t sit)…that is possible, but it wouldn’t really be reasonable in this case. It’s basically not reasonable if when someone presented the explanation, you would raise eyebrows, tilt your head, and say, “Dude” in a disbelieving manner. ;)

While the jury selection process is not very dramatic, and listening to all the testimony can be lengthy, the whole trial makes for a good basis for literature (and that includes non-fiction).

While I “decompress” a bit from my service, I thought I’d mention a few books where juries play an important part.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

by Lewis Carroll

While it certainly isn’t the most positive portrayal of a jury, I think it’s a way that a lot of people first encounter the concept in any meaningful way. Without spoiling much, Alice is a witness in a trial which has a lot of the structure of a real world trial, with evidence presented…but it all goes a bit wrong.

Twelve Angry Men (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)
by Reginald Rose

This one was originally a teleplay, and in 1957, became a great movie with Henry Fonda (there were many stars, but I thought Jack Klugman particularly stood out here). It really does show what the dynamics in a jury room can be like.

To Kill a Mockingbird (at AmazonSmile)
by Harper Lee

Finally coming out as a legal e-book on July 8th (it can be pre-ordered for $4.72 at time of writing), the jury here is represented as less a set of individuals and more as a symbol.

Those are three that spring to mind, although there are thousands of novels featuring juries (including some by John Grisham, of course.

If you are interested in non-fiction, there is actually a separate category for that in the USA Kindle store:

Kindle Store : Kindle eBooks : Professional & Technical : Law : Procedures & Litigation : Jury (at AmazonSmile)

There are actually people who are consultants on picking a jury, and certainly, lawyers are usually very careful about the choice. That’s why it can take so long. I’ve been told that one of the reasons I’ve been on three juries in ten years is that my first one reached a decision (actually, all three have). Having a hung jury isn’t good for either side, so that makes you desirable. I have a sibling who is quite math oriented (a physicist and an astronomer), and pointed out that there is so much chance before you even get to that point that my experience was still unusual. You have to be called in, then there is a lot of randomization before you get to  “voir dire”, where the attorneys question people looking for juries. I’m thinking that I tend to pass that part…but there probably isn’t a ten percent chance that I’ll get to it.

Do you have any favorite books with juries in them? Feel free to tell me and my readers by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

My new free Flipboard magazine, The Weird Old Days features vintage articles on ghosts, sea serpents, psychic phenomena, and more http://flip.it/ZtmYw

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Armchair Fiction: “nostalgic sci-fi and horror literature” for the Kindle

June 11, 2014

Armchair Fiction: “nostalgic sci-fi and horror literature” for the Kindle

I’m sure some of you, like me, remember the Ace Doubles (I still have some on my shelves). It was a series of science fiction paperbacks where there would actually be two books in one…and they were printed upside down to each other. In other words, you could flip the book over, and there would be another cover for another book on the “back”…both stories ended in the middle of the physical book.

I was excited to see that, in the spirit of that

Armchair Fiction

has been producing “double novels” of vintage science fiction and horror.

I was even more pleased when I ran across books from Armchair in the Kindle store:

Armchair Fiction in the USA Kindle store (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Naturally, they don’t have any kind of special “binding” in the Kindle format (and not all are doubles), but the authors and titles were really intriguing to me and the cover images stood out. Regular readers know I’m not all that visually-oriented, so if something catches my eye, there must really be something to it. ;)

The authors included:

  • Edmond Hamilton
  • Frank Belknap Long
  • Stanton A. Coblentz
  • Richard Shaver (of the Shaver Mystery…I’ve referenced Shaver once before in this blog)

In doing a little research, I was still more pleased (see how life just keeps getting better and better?) ;) that Armchair comes from the same creative source as

Sinister Cinema

I knew SinCin from ads in some of the offbeat magazines I have read.

I wrote to Armchair to find out if the books were all in the public domain, although I suspected that the artwork might be new (and there were new introductions).

Greg Luce was nice enough to give me a lengthy reply…and to give me permission to share it with you:

===

Hi, Bufo.

Thanks for getting a hold of us. I’m the owner and founder of both Sinister Cinema and Armchair Fiction. I started Sinister literally thirty years ago–Spring of 1984. Armchair was started in December of 2010, so we’ve been around for roughly three-and-a-half years. Many of the Armchair titles are in the public domain, but certainly not all. We do have any number of copyrighted works, including most notably some of the works of Robert Silverberg, whom I consider one of the best science fiction authors ever.

The reason I started Armchair was essentially to do the same for nostalgic sci-fi and horror literature that I did with nostalgic sci-fi and horror cinema. There are literally thousands of older literary works of sci-fi and horror (including both novels and short fiction) that haven’t been in print since their initial publication. These are what we specialize in, although we are certainly willing to come out with more common works as well–Wells, Burroughs, etc. The thing that had always held us up were the costs of printing large numbers of books and maintaining large volumes of inventory. Being a mom-and-pop company, that was just never practical for us. However, when print-on-demand companies (like Createspace) started showing up, it changed the whole playing field and made it possible for us to move forward with a line of paperback books specializing in these forgotten works.

I grew up reading Ace Doubles, sci-fi digest magazines, paperbacks from Ballantine, Signet, etc., and these were the inspirations for what we’re doing. It’s been a real labor of love and the book side is, frankly, very labor intensive. There are only three of us–myself and two very good employees. I have plans for 400 double novels (we have 130 right now), 150-200 single novels (we’re currently at about 60), as well as many varied short story collections. I don’t know if we’ll ever get these all done, but we’ve been releasing 45 to 60 books a year, and hopefully we’ll be able to keep plugging along for many years to come. I’m not looking to become a millionaire doing this (although we did just recently sell our 10,000th book) and I’m not looking for any notoriety within the sci-fi community, I just want to do it for the people who like this kind of stuff. If I can make a little money on the side…great; but we’re in it for the long-haul no matter what. I really believe in what we’re doing.

One thing I discovered is that not everything ever written is on the generally high levels of works brought out by companies like Ace, Ballantine, and other companies. When you’re dealing with the Ray Palmer years of Amazing and Fantastic Adventures for instance, it’s really a mixed bag. Some authors like Berkeley Livingston, Leroy Xerxa, and other Palmer regulars were really not very good. Yet there were a few exceptions: Rog Phillips, David Wright O’Brien, and even Chester S. Geier churned out some surprisingly good tales. Then of course there was Richard S. Shaver, who is one of our best-selling authors, second in fact only to Edmond Hamilton. Shaver was a horrible writer, yet there is something about his stuff that has a unique appeal to many fans. I think that Shaver was to sci-fi literature what Edward D. Wood was to sci-fi cinema. They were both brilliant in their inspired lunacy.

Regarding the covers, many are the artwork pieces that were originally painted or drawn for the stories. However, there are many titles that simply never had any color artwork when first published. In these cases I have to go through literally hundreds and hundreds of PD artwork pieces looking for something that works. I’ve been very fortunate so far. Sometimes we have to do massive changes to make an artwork piece work for a story. For instance, one of our new double novels has a tale called “Voyage of the Asteroid” by Laurence Manning. The cover art we used here was originally for another story and appeared on the cover of the February, 1929 issue of Amazing. I think it’s a Frank R. Paul piece. This cover, as originally published, had a number of alien beings attacking a Tyranosaurus with ray guns. We had to get rid of the aliens and their ray guns in order for this cover to work. Using Photoshop (I’ve gotten pretty good with the clone tool!) I had to painstakingly get rid of them. It took me a while, but the end result was very good. Finding and preparing artwork is always a bit of a challenge.

At any rate, I hope this all helps. We don’t have that many Kindle editions of our books up yet (only about twenty) but more are coming. Right now the paperback editions are outselling their Kindle counterparts, probably because of the collectability aspects of the books themselves.

<snip>

Thanks for your interest,

Sincerely,
Greg Luce

Sinister Cinema/Armchair Fiction

===

If you like science fiction of the “Golden Age”, I’d suggest you check them out. These might also be an excellent little gift for Father’s Day…especially if you have a geeky father in the “Monster Kids” generation (Baby Boomers, basically…if your Dad has ever mentioned Famous Monsters of Filmland or watching a local “Creature Features” type TV host in the 1960s or so, they are in this group).

The prices are good, and they look to be lovingly produced. :)

Enjoy!

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

My new free Flipboard magazine, The Weird Old Days features vintage articles on ghosts, sea serpents, psychic phenomena, and more http://flip.it/ZtmYw

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Fiction #1s of the 1960s

June 6, 2014

Fiction #1s of the 1960s

I’m finding CNN’s 1960s series interesting…although I’m betting they don’t do one on books of the 1960s. ;)

So, I thought I’d do a post on that.

Now, covering all the important books of the 1960s would be too wordy…even for me. ;)

After all, that was the start of the New Wave of science fiction. It was the blossoming of Marvel Comics. It was To Kill a Mockingbird, Slaughterhouse-Five, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Portnoy’s Complaint, Catch 22, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, The Bell Jar, and The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, just to name a few.

In order to put a focus on it, I decided to look at the New York Times #1 fiction bestsellers for the 1960s…which I could do at the

Hawes Publications site

I was also interested in how many of them are available in the USA Kindle store, so I’ll note that as well.

1960:

1961:

1962:

1963:

1964:

1965:

1966:

1967:

1968:

1969:

There you go!

Well, I’m quite pleased to say that none of the available books had text-to-speech access blocked!

I’m also pleased with how many of the books are available. The prices, by the way, probably run around eight to eleven dollars…more than they were in paperback back then…hm, I’m guessing that’s not terribly out of line with a hardback then, although it may be higher than they were.

I would also say I’ve at heard of most of them, and read some. :)

How about you? Any other 1960s favorites you care to share with me and my readers? How many of these have you read? Feel free to comment on this post to answer.

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Series for the Summer 2014

May 29, 2014

Series for the Summer 2014

When did summer become the best season for entertainment?

Certainly, we can point to Jaws (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) in 1975 for redefining summer movies.

Television…in the summer?

You bet!

Some of the real “event TV” happens during the summer now…it’s no longer just re-runs while kids hypothetically play…what’s that called again? Oh, yeah, “outside”. ;) This summer includes Under the Dome, Extant, True Blood, and…um…Sharknado 2!

What about books?

Well, there are traditionally the “beach reads”, but typically, you can run through one of those pretty quickly…that’s hardly a whole season’s worth.

What I thought I’d do in this post is propose some series you could read.

Our now adult kid always created their own “project” for the summer, and that makes some sense to me. Whether you are actually on a different schedule or not, summer (however you define it) does seem to feel different.

For many people, including movie theatres, summer starts with the Memorial Day weekend and ends with the Labor Day weekend.

Let’s make this easy and call it twelve weeks.

At first, I wanted to just include series here that were “finished”, so you could feel a sense of accomplishment…but “over” isn’t really over any more. Oh, you could try and define it as just by the original author, and that might work…but even ignoring fanfic (unauthorized fan written fiction) and Kindle Worlds (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*), there can always be official books added to a series (until it falls into the public domain, where pretty much nothing is official).

I also won’t tell you that some of these series don’t get worse as you go along. ;) For me, it’s more about spending the summer in a different world, with a different set of people to know…and hey, if you’ve ever spent a summer with a group, you know that doesn’t always go smoothly the whole time. ;)

I also debated a bit with myself over whether to favor omnibus editions (several books in one purchase) or individual titles. Certainly, omnibuses are easier to buy, and on a Kindle, no harder to carry with you than an individual book.  However, some people may balk at paying $50 at once, rather than, say, $8…and it’s a bit harder to navigate and annotate an omnibus. Another big advantage for the omnibus, as far as I’m concerned, is that they may not block text-to-speech access when at least some of the individual titles do. I suspect that’s because the individual e-book may be seen as a sales threat to the audiobook (although my guess has always been that that isn’t true)…and the omnibus typically doesn’t also have an audiobook edition (can you imagine the file size of a six book audiobook?).

What I decided to do is link to the omnibus, where available. One reason for that? Getting a sample of an omnibus gets you a lot more…in some cases, it might even get you the entire first book for free. From there, you might feel obligated to buy the book…but you’ll certainly have a better sense of whether or not you want to devote your summer to this series. Some of these books also have a “series page” at Amazon, and I may also link to that.

Oh, that’s a good point! There’s no reason you can’t be reading more than the series in the next few months, although I know a lot of you get very linear like that. I like to skip around, reading many books at the same time, although I did read three and a half novels of a single series in one day once (that’s my record). :)

Here are a few suggestions:

The Dresden Files
by Jim Butcher
2000 – Present
15 novels to date: other material includes a TV series, short stories, graphic novels, audiobooks (often read by James Marsters), and a role-playing game
First book: 4.2 out of five stars, 1,077 customer reviews
Most recent book: 4.9 stars, 195 reviews

The Dresden Files Book Series page at Amazon (at AmazonSmile)

The Dresden Files Collection 1-6 (at AmazonSmile)

Series novels (in order):

  1. Storm Front
  2. Fool Moon
  3. Grave Peril
  4. Summer Knight
  5. Death Masks
  6. Blood Rites
  7. Dead Beat
  8. Proven Guilty
  9. White Night
  10. Small Favor
  11. Turn Coat
  12. Changes
  13. Ghost Story
  14. Cold Days
  15. Skin Game

Harry Dresden is a wizard. Not the pointy-hatted, white horse riding kind, but the driving a beat-up Volkswagen, looking for the next paycheck, late on the rent in Chicago kind. Harry is charmingly self-deprecating…and the criticism isn’t all undeserved (although the magic is real, and can be impressive).The books are funny and well-written, and importantly (although you wouldn’t want to say it to Harry’s face) Harry is noble.

Outlander
by Diana Gabaldon
1991 – Present
7 novels to date with another one due out in June: other material includes a Starz TV series set to debut on August 9
First book: 4.4 stars, 4,112 reviews
Most recent book: 4.1 stars, 1,316 reviews

Outlander Book Series page at Amazon (at AmazonSmile)

The Outlander Series 7-Book Bundle (at AmazonSmile)

Series novels (in order):

  1. Outlander
  2. Dragonfly in Amber
  3. Voyager
  4. Drums of Autumn
  5. The Fiery Cross
  6. A Breath of Snow and Ashes
  7. An Echo in the Bone
  8. Written in My Own Heart’s Blood (due June 10)

These are time travelling historical romances…after the success of these, I’m guessing that your local brick-and-mortar bookstore may have a shelf labeled that. ;) This may be a buzzy TV series, so you might want to read them before that.

Tom Sawyer series
Mark Twain
1876 – 1896
Four books: other material includes myriad adaptations
First book: 4.2 stars, 507 reviews
Most recent book: 4.2 stars, 31 reviews

Tom Sawyer series page at Amazon (at AmazonSmile)

The Complete Series of Tom Sawyer: Classic Annotated and Illustrated Edition (at AmazonSmile)

Series books (in order):

  1. Adventures of Tom Sawyer
  2. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  3. Tom Sawyer Abroad
  4. Tom Sawyer, Detective

While you certainly might have read two of these, I’m guessing most of you haven’t read all four of them recently.

I picked an omnibus that was inexpensive ($2.99), but seems decent…for one thing, it includes the original illustrations (at least, from what I’ve seen in the sample), and has additional materials. It’s worth noting that you can get each of these for free legally, but an omnibus can be convenient.

There are three possibilities…there are so many other possibilities, I think I’ll let you suggest them in your comments. :)

What do you think? Do you read different books in the summer? Have you ever set yourself a summer reading goal? What are your favorite book series? What’s the most books you’ve read in a series (for me, it’s the 181 original Doc Savage “adventures”…although I’ve read other Doc novels, too)? How do you define a “book series”? Do you always read them in order? Feel free to let me and my readers know what you think by commenting on this post.

Additional note: I have a personal commitment going on that may slow down my response to your comments. It should not prevent me from posting, though.

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Five books about words

May 17, 2014

Five books about words

How many books have you read?

Well, I suppose, since I read an unabridged dictionary cover to cover when I was a kid, I could say I’ve read just about all of them…after all, they are all the same words, just in a different order, right? ;)

Of course, I doubt that dictionary could “grok” (a word invented by Robert Heinlein in Stranger in a Strange Land ((at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*))…essentially, it means to understand something so thoroughly that you become one with it) all of the words in all of the books I’ve read.

I do like neologisms, and I sometimes indulge myself in creating them…although, admittedly, mine are typically portmanteaus (two words smushed together) or initialisms or acronyms…not really brand new words.

My favorite book about words is not available for the Kindle…yet.

Mrs Byrne’s Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure, and Preposterous Words (at AmazonSmile)

Also unavailable?

I Hear America Talking: An Illustrated History of American Words and Phrases (at AmazonSmile)

So, what I decided to do, after having a conversation (via comment) with Lady Galaxy, one of my regular readers and commenters, is to see what is available about words in the USA Kindle store…and share some with you that stood out to me.

Authorisms: Words Wrought by Writers (at AmazonSmile)
by Paul Dickson
5 out of 5 stars, 2 customer reviews
$9.99 at time of writing

Paul Dickson is one of those authors whose works greatly appeal to me…because Dickson seems to be interested in everything. ;) Lexicography (which is a loose idea of what we are discussing in this post, although it is actually much more specific) is just one of them (Dickson has written many books on many subjects…not with the depth of the legendary Isaac Asimov, but certainly, with an admirable breadth). Words (and, we need to be clear, phrases) created by authors which then become common usage? I love that! I also like it when pop culture references are used without knowledge of the original context…for example, in high school, I might hear someone say, “Which way did they go, George?” indicating a person with…intellectual challenges. They generally did not know that the voice they were imitating came from a Warner Brothers cartoon…and surely didn’t connect it with Of Mice and Men. I’ve added this one to my wish list! :)

The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography (at AmazonSmile)
by B.T. Atkins, Michael Rundell
no reviews yet
$37.49

Gee, nobody has reviewed this almost $40 book on how to create a dictionary yet? ;) Atkins has been the “Lexicographic Adviser to Oxford University Press”, and it sounds like an interesting (although geared towards professionals) read.

The Story of Ain’t: America, Its Language, and the Most Controversial Dictionary Ever Published (at AmazonSmile)
by David Skinner
3.7 stars, 21 reviews
$9.78

This is the story of Webster’s 3rd, a dictionary that then committed the (perceived as) nearly heretical action of including slang. Our adult kid, the linguist, has done an excellent job of getting me over an irrational rejection of “improper” usage. I’ve always loved slang (and understood the use of it), but “incorrect” use of a word would bother me. For example, I see very educated people using the word “decimate” to indicate that something was almost destroyed…when, actually, it only means it was reduced by a tenth (which would still be a tragedy, if we are talking about, say, ten soldiers out of a hundred killed). Also, when people talk about getting several good things done at once as getting them done in a “fell swoop”, when “fell” specifically refers to bad things. I think learning that much of what we argue is proper “English” comes from Noah Webster making up American spellings largely as a political move (no different from people saying something like “herstory” instead of “history” to make the gender switch) that also helped me understand the legitimacy of an evolving language.

The Little Dictionary of Big Words You Should Know (at AmazonSmile)
by Ian Wilson
5 stars, 1 review
$4.50

It puts me off a bit that they say the book is an “antidote” to text speak…there has been some good evidence that people who use text abbreviations are actually likely to be more serious readers, and better users of English. It makes sense: for you to be able to read and understand “u 8 yet?” requires some pretty sophisticated word substitution and language skills. Still, I think it’s a good thing to expose people to more words.

Reading the OED: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages (at AmazonSmile)
by Ammon Shea
4.3 stars, 53 reviews
$9.99

Ammon Shea, I salute you! I’m also a big jealous. ;) This reminds me of another book I read about an author reading all of the Encyclopedia Britannica…unlike the books on this list, that one has text-to-speech access blocked, unfortunately.

There you go! That’s five, but I could certainly keep going.

What about you? Do you have a favorite book about words? What are your “pet peeves” about “improper” language use? I’ll go ahead and tell you one that still catches me out each time, even though I have gotten past the strong emotional reaction. It’s when people leave out the word “other”. For example, “We have better deals than any car dealership in California!” I assume from that that the sponsor either isn’t a car dealership or isn’t in California…which isn’t there intent, but that’s actually how my brain processes the claim. For me, it should be, “We have better deals than any other car dealership in California!” Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Bonus deal:

One of today’s Kindle Daily Deal‘s (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) is any of seven Dresden Files novels by Jim Butcher for $1.99 each. You could get somebody quite a gift for $13.93 if you did all seven and delayed their delivery for the appropriate gift giving occasion…or give yourself a good summer with a wizard/detective. ;)

New! Try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

A book I’m reading now: Thinking, Fast and Slow

May 15, 2014

A book I’m reading now: Thinking, Fast and Slow

I’ve generally moved writing book reviews to my

Goodreads feed

but this is a case where I think the book has a lot of bearing on topics we discuss here. I’d go so far as to say it is one of the most important books I’ve ever read…although it tells you why it won’t have as much impact on you as  it might. ;)

It’s

Thinking, Fast and Slow (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

by Daniel Kahneman, who won the Nobel Prize for economics.

This is not really a book about economics, though.

It’s about how you (and other people) think.

I have to say, I read quite a few books like this. This one is not only largely counter-intuitive, it’s backed up by science. I love when the author writes an exercise to prove something…and then (largely accurately) tells me how I felt doing it!

I’m 53% through it, and there have already been several concepts that may change my life.

As many of you know, I’m a trainer. I also do process improvement.

Let me give you one example of something that shows that a lot of what we do at work may not be doing what we think (in the process improvement part).

Some of you will know this, but it is “regression to the mean”.

Here’s the basic idea:

Let’s say that there is something that you are doing which has a significant “luck” element. We’ll call it “luck”, but let’s consider it something that can randomly help you or hurt you (like…the wind when you are playing golf).

We’ll say that the task is 25% dependent on luck (which is lower than is often the case).

I’ll propose a task: getting to work on time. 75% of that is controllable by the employee…leaving on time, knowing the route, having the car fueled up, and so on. 25% of it is just luck: traffic accidents, road closures…again, that’s probably a small percentage.

You look at one month’s worth of data.

You identify a group that is 100% on time, and a group that is 50% on time.

You give the people who are 100% on time a bonus, to reward their good behavior.

The 50% group? They get remedial training.

The next time you measure that 50% group, you see that they are on time 75% of the time! What a great improvement, right?

Not necessarily…

Both of those groups could have already been performing their part of the task perfectly…75% success was due to that.

Then, there was that “luck” 25%.

The people you helped? They just happened to be incredibly unlucky during that month.

The 100% group? They might have been incredibly lucky.

You are going to feel like you helped the poor group…but if you looked at the good group, they probably also slipped towards 75%. They just aren’t going to be that incredibly lucky two months in a row.

The lucky people and unlucky people both move back towards the middle (because their luck doesn’t stay as extreme)…that’s what “regression to the mean” indicates.

I’m sure a lot of consultants make big bucks because of regression to the mean. What company would ask them to measure the 100% crowd again?  They just want them to concentrate on the “remedial” group.

That’s just one idea.

Another really important one, which affects how people feel about Kindle updates, is that people feel loss a lot more than they do gain.

Economists tend to expect people to act rationally. If you can profit by doing something, they expect you to do it.

That’s not the way people actually behave.

Suppose I gave you a choice.

You can flip a coin: heads, you pay me $10. Tails, I pay you $10.01.

The odds are, you don’t want that deal. The loss feels much worse than the one penny gain.

Logically, you should want to flip the coin, right? You could come out ahead…it’s just as likely as you losing the $10.

What if it was heads you pay me $10, tails, I pay you $20?

Would that do it?

It would be much more likely to do it for most people.

The odds, though, are still the same of winning or losing as the first offer.

What if it was $10 loss possibility, and $100 winning opportunity?

Another big thing Kahneman is talking about is reference points…you judge the value of something by your own history, not just as an isolated element.

If I gave you a thousand dollars, and then offered the first bet, you’d be much more likely to take it.

Why?

Because you already think you came out $1,000 ahead. Your reference point for the deal is where you were before we started dealing, not after the $1,000.

There is a lot, lot more to this!

What I’m going to do is recommend the book to you…both to you, and for you to give as a gift.

While I tend to get something valuable out of every book I read, I rarely do that.

I will say that the book took a while to get into more practical things. There is a lot of necessary explanation about the “two systems” of thought that you have…and I’ve found myself referring to that idea just in day to day conversations!

I’m writing about this now because, well, you might want to read it before I finish it. :)

One more thing: at time of writing, it is $2.99 in the USA Kindle store! That might not last.

If you have read it (or do read it), I’d be interested to know what you think. This is non-fiction, so spoilers aren’t like they are in fiction. :)

New! Try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Best reviewed Kindle books May 2014

May 13, 2014

Best reviewed Kindle books May 2014

Do Kindle book reviews matter to you?

They do to me.

Not that it’s as simple as “This one has more stars than that one.” A lot of factors affect that…including how many reviews there are.

Another big factor seems to be the subject matter. It appears to me that faith based books often have a significantly higher average. Perhaps that’s because people are less likely to review them negatively? Maybe they feel like it is a “cause” they should support with more stars? Not sure…

I thought I’d take a look at the

Best reviewed books in the USA Kindle store (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Amazon does, by the way, give more weight to more reviews when you sort by “Avg. Customer Review”, which I did above.

#1: Homicide in High Heels: High Heels Mysteries book #8 (at AmazonSmile)
by Gemma Halliday
Mystery
$4.99
5.0 stars, 552 customer reviews

This one is really head and shoulders above the rest…and not just because of those heels! Seriously…try getting 551 people to give five stars to having oxygen to breath. ;) One person did rate it at four stars, but with a gushingly positive review. Some people simply won’t give the top grade no matter what…

May I Have Your Order, Please?: How to get what you want from God! (at AmazonSmile)
by Rickie Rush
Religion
$10.09
5.0 stars, 232 reviews

This one has a four star…and a 1 star. The one star objects to the motivations of the author, by selling the book instead of giving it away…

Little Blue Truck
by Alice Schertle, Jill McElmurray (illustrator)
children’s
$3.80
4.9 stars, 411 reviews

Again, there’s one 1-star review…might have been interesting just to do a post on those 1-star outliers. This one liked the book, but didn’t think it translated well to the Kindle.

Building an Empire:The Most Complete Blueprint to Building a Massive Network Marketing Business (at AmazonSmile)
by Brian Carruthers
Entrepreneurship
5 stars, 123 reviews

The Promise of a Pencil
by Adam Braun
Business life, ethics
$13.99
5 stars, 334 reviews

I am not linking to this one because they are blocking text-to-speech access. That seems particularly…hard to justify in a book like this, which is about making a positive difference in other people’s lives. It seems hypocritical for the publisher (not the author) to insert code into a book that prevents access to it by those with print disabilities, when the subject matter is about giving access to people (through providing them with the tools for education).

Let’s do a quick run down of best reviewed titles by topic:

Arts & Photography:

Prophet – The Story of Nat Turner

Biographies & Memoirs:

The Promise of a Pencil (the same book as above)

Business & Money:

Building an Empire (see above)

Children’s Books:

Little Blue Truck (see above)

Comics & Graphic Novels:

Bad Machinery Volume 2: The Case of the Good Boy

Computers & Technology:

Cisco CCNA in 60 Days

Cookbooks:

The Oh She Glows Cookbook

Crafts, Hobbies, & Home:

As Bright as the Sun

Education & Teaching

The Promise of a Pencil (sigh…I started this part so I wouldn’t end with that book…now it keeps popping up again)

Gay and Lesbian:

Ethan

Health, Fitness & Dieting:

Healing After Loss

History:

With the Old Breed: at Peleliu and Okinawa

Literature & Fiction:

Homicide in High Heels (see above)

Mystery, Thriller & Suspense

Homicide in High Heels (see above)

Nonfiction:

Building an Empire (see above)

Parenting & Relationships:

Motherhood Realized

Politics & Social Sciences:

Tattoos on the Heart

Professional and Technical:

The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog

Reference:

Wonder

Religion & Spirituality:

May I Have Your Order, Please? (see above)

Romance:

Archer’s Voice

Science & Math:

The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog (see above)

Science Fiction & Fantasy:

Words of Radiance

Self-Help:

Tattoos on the Heart (see above)

Sports & Outdoor:

The Duck Commander Devotional

Teen & Young Adult:

Jesus Calling

Travel:

Humans of New York

Foreign Languages:

Go Pro 7 (in Spanish)

Hmm…one thing you can see is how many books are the best reviewed books in more than one category. That makes sense…the book is equally well-reviewed regardless of category, so if it is towards the top, that is likely to be true in every category which the publisher chose.

What do you think? Do you care about customer reviews? Are more reviews more convincing? Have you ever noticed an outlying one-star review which amused you? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

New! Try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,298 other followers

%d bloggers like this: