Archive for the ‘Sales’ Category

Comic Con inspired bargains

July 23, 2014

Comic Con inspired bargains

Tonight is the preview night for

San Diego Comic Con (SDCC)

which is one of the biggest pop culture events of the year.

In fact, it’s big enough that companies tie into it with merchandise/content sales…and not just on comics.

The con itself certainly goes beyond comic books/graphic novels. Some old timers complain that it has become too much about movies and TV…even ones that aren’t even especially geeky (and I use that adjective as a proud geek).

Authors of text-based books (you know…what many people just call “books”) ;) also appear: Diana Gabaldon, Robin Hobb, Jim Butcher, and more. Even the publishers (Simon & Schuster, Penguin Random House) have panels.

So, through this weekend, we’ll be able to find bargains…even if they don’t specifically say they are there because of Comic Con, that may be the case.

For example, one of today’s Kindle Daily Deals is

Batman Day graphic novels sale (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

This is Batman’s 75th anniversary year..the Dark Knight (or Caped Crusader…depends a bit on your perspective) debuted in what is sometimes considered the best pop culture year, 1939.

Batman (along with Superman) certainly seems to have taken some inspiration from Doc Savage (Doc was a wealthy crimefighter with specialized vehicles and equipment…including a “utility vest”, which arguably became Batman’s utility belt), but that’s another story. :)

There have been some Batman graphic novels that are really considered classic by Batman fans…and yes, they are included here for $2.99 each.

That includes:

  • Batman: The Dark Knight by Frank Miller
  • Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore

If you’ve never read a graphic novel, I’d recommend The Dark Knight…and warn you ahead of time, those two in particular are not written for children.

Amazon is also giving us

Batman Eternal #1 (at AmazonSmile)

for free!

You need to enter a promotional code (BATMAN75) first…you can see all the details here:

Batman Eternal #1 promo detail page (at AmazonSmile)

I suspect we’ll see more related specials over the next few days in the

Kindle Daily Deals (at AmazonSmile)

Another place at Amazon where we’ll see savings through the weekend, and these may be explicitly SDCC deals, is

The Geek Boutique (at AmazonSmile)

One more thing before I leave Amazon. Here’s a link for

Prime Video Comic-Con Favorites (at AmazonSmile)

If you are an eligible Prime member, you can watch these at no additional cost…and there are 227 results at time of writing.

Let’s move off of Amazon for a minute to go to Marvel.

Marvel has “Marvel Unlimited”, which you can think of as similar to Kindle Unlimited…just for digital Marvel comics.

Normally, that’s $9.99 a month. It includes a lot of comics…typically, you can expect that when a Marvel comic is six months past its publication date, it may appear here.

As a special tie-in to SDCC, though, you can get the first month for $0.99!

You can have 12 comics out at a time (KU allows ten titles).

You can get more information on it here:

http://marvel.com/mu?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=AcquisitionEmail&utm_content=072314EMSubscribeNow&utm_campaign=SDCC14

The necessary app isn’t in the Amazon Appstore, but you could get it at

1Mobile

Amazon allows us to install apps from “unknown sources” on our Kindle Fires, but you have to make the call. Since the app won’t have been reviewed by Amazon to make sure it is safe and that it works on the KFire, you take responsibility for that.

This is one where I would feel comfortable getting it, and I have gotten things for my KFire from 1Mobile before.

You can count on bargains from other geeky sites, too, like

ThinkGeek.com

and

SuperHeroStuff.com

Enjoy!

Bonus story:

In a

press release

today, Amazon announced that it has added hundreds of thousands of songs to Prime Music (at AmazonSmile)…and hundreds of playlists.

That’s the no additional cost streaming music for eligible Amazon Prime members.

In my recent post

A Day in the Life of a Kindleer 2014

I didn’t talk about using Prime Music, but I have used it sporadically…I sometimes write with it on, for example.

It looks like Prime Music has been quite successful. Adding hundreds of thousands of songs to it is great! I haven’t been terribly impressed with their playlists, although it is nice to have fifty songs of one genre play with one selection. I’m just not sure that I’m seeing genuine creativity n how songs are grouped together in the playlists. I some cases, they seem a bit more like…search results, rather than curated music lists.

For example, the press release mentions one called “Fire for Your Fire”, and describes it as “Odes to all things fire make perfect listening on your Fire Phone or Kindle Fire”. I’m guessing that it’s just a bunch of songs with “fire” in the title, although I’m not seeing it yet on the site.

Curation seems to be better at Songza, but this is new for Amazon. One thing they could do is let customers share playlists, then have people “like” them…and with enough likes, a playlist moves up into a better discovery spot. That would create social engagement, and probably result in better playlists.

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Round up #261: Shannara to the screen, $85 PW2 refurb

July 15, 2014

Round up #261: Shannara to the screen, $85 PW2 refurb

The ILMK Round ups are short pieces which may or may not be expanded later.

Refurb PW2 for $85 (today only)

I know that many of my readers prefer the non-Fire Kindles, so it’s always nice to be able to write about a deal for them. ;)

Gold Box Deal of the Day: KPW2 refurb for $85 (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

That’s the current generation Kindle Paperwhite, which is normally priced (this is all the USA store…this deal may not be available in your country) for $109.

The Paperwhite is a great reader. It’s only big lack is in not having sound, so it can’t do text-to-speech (or audiobooks or music), but otherwise, I like it a lot.

“Refurbed” is short for “refurbished”. I’d never hesitate to buy a refurb from Amazon: they have the same warranty as a new one, and they’ve been inspected perhaps more carefully.

I would guess that new items have been inspected outside Amazon (by the actual manufacturer), and refurbs are inspected at Amazon, although I don’t know that for sure.

This is a Deal of the Day, so although it may go on sale again at some point in the future, it won’t be the price tomorrow.

If you’ve been debating getting a newer model non-Fire Kindle, this is something to consider. I’d say that there are people who prefer some of the earlier models (both for the sound, as I mentioned, and for a physical keyboard), but they won’t last forever…

The Hachazon War and the rhetoric of class warfare

This

Gigaom article by Laura Hazard Owen

is one of the most interesting takes I’ve seen on what I call the Hachazon War (the dispute between retailer Amazon and publisher Hachette) to date.

The lengthy piece points out how Amazon is positioning itself as being the populist entity, and the publishers are the establishment.

Well, yes.

Despite Amazon being a huge corporation, in this case, they have very much empowered small indies (independent publishers, which can be individual authors) and disrupted the status quo.

Which authors have tended to come out in favor of the big publishers?

Brand name authors who have benefited from the tradpubs’ (traditional publishers’) prior dominance.

Which authors have tended to come out in favor of Amazon?

Indies, even if some of them make enough money now to be in the same league as many tradpubbed authors.

When being published and widely distributed required a huge infrastructure, tradpubs ruled.

E-books don’t require that same structure. Accurately, we can say that Amazon provides that infrastructure…to pretty much everyone.

Amazon also pays more royalties (the percentage authors get of each sale) that the tradpubs.

I do think tradpubs bring legitimate value to the process…but theirs is no longer the only process.

Owen does a great job of pointing out how even their corporate language differs, with Hachette tending to be formal, and Amazon tending to be informal.

I highly recommend that article.

On the other hand, there is this

Huffington Post article by Maddie Crum

It’s about how to “quit Amazon” as a customer, and is written in a humorous fashion.

I don’t put this one on the “other hand” because it is anti-Amazon…while I like Amazon, I haven’t liked some of their tactics in the Hachazon War, and have said so.

There was one particular statement, though, that pulled me up short:

“How does one stop purchasing books, and also many other things, from a company that has been repeatedly accused of price fixing…”

Um…I’m not sure if Crum realized that accusations of price-fixing against Amazon came from publishers…who accused them of fixing the prices too low! Publishers complained about Amazon selling bestsellers (apparently often at a loss) at $9.99, which led to the agreements with Apple to raise those prices that eventually brought in action by the Department of Justice (DoJ).

Amazon has been accused of a lot of things by a lot of people (including pressuring publishers, including academic publishers, to take a smaller cut), but artificially raising prices and locking them in at a higher price hasn’t commonly been one of them.

In an article supposedly explaining why it is…perhaps inappropriate to keep shopping at Amazon as a customer, pointing out that they have low prices may be ineffective. ;)

A bestseller…and more than fifty years old

I’ve been watching the sales ranking of

To Kill a Mockingbird (at AmazonSmile)

It’s been in the top 100 in the USA Kindle store.

That matches my prediction that it could be one of bestselling e-books of the year, although we have a ways to go yet.

I think we may see a considerable jump in its sales when the school year has started (as the book gets assigned), and I think it may also be a popular holiday gift.

Due to the former reason, I think it will have solid sales for quite some time.

E-books have a much longer sales cycle than p-books (paperbooks). The economics are very different. You don’t have to predict how many to print and order and store, so you don’t have to tie your promotional efforts into that time when the paper copies are available.

With p-books, you typically get huge sales in the beginning, and a rapid dwindling.

With e-books, they are around (with no supply challenges) for a long time. It may be that they sell almost nothing at first, and then spike, then taper a bit, then sell at a lower level, then spike again, and so on.

Very different strategies, just based on the medium.

Terry Brooks’ Shannara coming to MTV

No, this is not Game of Thrones. ;)

A popular fantasy series is being adapted for television:

Shannara series (at AmazonSmile)

The feel of the two is very different…this should be a whole lot lighter.

According to this

The Hollywood Reporter article by Lesley Goldberg

and other sources, the series has solid geek cred in the production department: Jon Favreau (Iron Man), Al Gough and Miles Millar (Smallville).

This is another case where you might want to read the books first. The series will reportedly be based on The Elfstones of Shannara. Text-to-speech access is blocked in the single edition, but not in

The Sword of Shannara Trilogy (at AmazonSmile)

omnibus (three novels in one).

There are more than two dozen books in the series, with more on the way…

What do you think? Do you buy refurbs? Even though I think they are fine, I don’t usually do that. One reason? Since I’m going to write about them, I want them on release day. When do you buy a new model Kindle for yourself? Only when an old one fails? When a new one is released because, you know, that’s cool? When they are on sale? Is Amazon the champion of the “little guy”? Think back to when you were in high school (assuming you no longer are)…what media did you love that was fifty years old at that point? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

50 Kindle books for $2 each

July 14, 2014

50 Kindle books for $2 each

It’s possible to become jaded to sales in the Kindle store…there are so many of them, and the prices are often quite low even when books aren’t on sale.

Right now, there are more than half a million books in the USA Kindle store that are two dollars or less, for example.

This sale:

50 Kindle books for $2 each (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

though, has some interesting elements to it.

First, they all look to me to be traditionally published by Amazon.

When I say “traditionally published”, I mean that Amazon chose the book…the publisher didn’t just put the book in the store without it being editorially evaluated, which is what happens when books go through Kindle Direct Publishing.

In my experience with Amazon’s traditionally published books, they’ve felt professionally done: not a lot of typos, for example.

Tradpubbed by Amazon also means that they will generally have the extra features: they’ll be available in the KOLL (Kindle Owners’ Lending Library); they’ll have text-t0-speech available; they’ll be lending enabled; and they may have X-Ray and Whispersync for Voice.

So, this sale is a good opportunity to get professionally produced books with the extras for a low price.

Second…I’ve read some of them. :)

I do read some pretty obscure books, but it’s possible that you will also have heard of some of these.

Here are a few of them which caught my eye:

How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain (at AmazonSmile)
by Gregory Berns
4.2 stars out of 5, 323 customer reviews
non-fiction, neuroscience

I read this one and enjoyed it quite a bit. It’s not a technical book…there is quite a bit about how they were able to get the experiment approved and get conscious dogs to stay still in an MRI (it can be hard to get people to do that).

Apocalypse Z: The Beginning of the End (at AmazonSmile)
by Manuel Loureiro
4.2 stars, 2182 reviews
fiction-horror

I read this one, too: my mini-review is in this post:

Round up #185: royal librarian, B&N CEO steps down

I said, in part:

“Overall, I found it an engaging, fast read. It will be too violent for some, but it isn’t just gore for gore’s sake. It’s much more about how the character reacts than it is about that. I always like to let people know about the use of the “F word”, and that’s here, but not really out of place. I have a lot more trouble with books that just indicate everybody is horrible, and that isn’t the case here. I like that.”

Two other books in the series are also available as part of the sale: Dark Days; and The Wrath of the Just

That means that for $6, you could get yourself (or somebody else…you can delay a Kindle gift being delivered until an appropriate gift giving occasion) three novels in a series, all rated four stars or above.

The Boy from Reactor 4 (The Nadia Tesla Series, Book One) (at AmazonSmile)
by Orest Stelmach
4.0 stars, 750 reviews
mysteries, thrillers, and suspense – espionage

The Boy Who Stole from the Dead, the second book of the series, is also available as part of this sale for $2.

The Palace Job (at AmazonSmile)
by Patricia Weekes
4.0 stars, 169 reviews
mystery, thrillers, and suspense – science fiction & fantasy

A heist caper…with elves!

Midnight Train to Paris (at AmazonSmile)
by Julliette Sobanet
3.9 stars, 233 reviews
romance – time travel (yes, that’s a category)

Starship Grifters (A Rex Nihilo Adventure) (at AmazonSmile)
by Robert Kroese
4.5 stars, 60 reviews
science fiction – space opera

I’m tempted by this one! I do like humorous science fiction, such as Bill, the Galactic Hero. :) The reviews make it sound like it might be fun.

Blood Makes Noise (at AmazonSmile)
by Gregory Widen
4.0 stars, 232 reviews
historical fiction – mystery, thriller, and suspense

I wouldn’t say the title or cover engaged me, but the author and premise both do. Gregory Widen is a screenwriter, known in my kind of geek circles for Highlander (“In the end, there can be only one.”). The story is based on true events surrounding the body of Eva Peron…and the CIA’s involvement with it.

The Hiccupotamus (at AmazonSmile)
by Aaron Zenz
4.3 stars, 323 reviews
children’s, mammals

An illustrated children’s book…with text-to-speech enabled…and well-reviewed…for $2!

The Basement (at AmazonSmile)
by Stephen Leather
3.7 stars, 210 reviews
mystery, thriller, and suspense – hard boiled – serial killers

I’ve read another book by Stephen Leather. I wasn’t crazy about it, but it was worth reading.

Enjoy!

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Heads up! 1TB Portable Hard Drive for $25: 5:00 PM Pacific!

July 11, 2014

Heads up! 1TB Portable Hard Drive for $25: 5:00 PM Pacific!

These are going to sell out quickly at $25!

It’s a one terabyte portable hard drive for $25…74% off the $94.99 normal price.

They are only doing 10,000 of these.

Buy this for yourself, or for a gift…

These are special limited time offers, which are only available to Kindle Fire owners.

What happens is you can get a text to alert you to an upcoming deal (details in the links below). You don’t get much warning…maybe an hour (about half an hour in this case).

The deal also appears on the sleep screen of your Fire, and you can find it under Offers on the homescreen (all the way at the end).

Then, you say you want to “learn more”. You’ll get to a screen with a countdown clock. As soon as the clock gets to zero, you need to click to have a chance to get it.

They have typically been selling out in seconds.

Here is information on the program:

As I’ve written before, I look at these LTOs (Limited Time Offers) sort of like buying a lottery ticket: I don’t expect to get one (win), but its exciting if I do! Of course, the “ticket” doesn’t cost me anything.

These LTOs are one of the best arguments for having Special Offers…and yes, a good argument for having a  Fire (at AmazonSmile)!

Did you get one? Do you have any other comment on this? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

One more thing: I’ve had a couple of readers say that they never even saw the offer. As far as I know, these go out to every eligible Kindle Fire in the USA. A few possibilities occur to me:

  • They either bought a Kindle Fire without Special Offers, or bought out of the offers later. You have to be subscribed to those in order to get these deals
  • They weren’t connected to wireless in time for it to update
  • They didn’t check the Offers tab (I don’t always see it on the sleep screen)

It might not have been any of those, but those three would have done it.

===

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

“Back to School” Kindle Fire sale…in July?

July 9, 2014

“Back to School” Kindle Fire sale…in July?

I don’t even think that if they mean summer school that makes sense. ;)

Still, it’s a good sale, even if I don’t understand the way Amazon labeled the sale. They actually have that label in more than one place…maybe people are shopping now for the fall year? Maybe it’s for modular schedules? Oh, well…

Back to School store (at AmazonSmile)

You can get $50 off some Kindle tablets (and $30 off some) and 20% off some accessories:

Kindle Fire HD 7″ (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

From that page, you can choose the configuration you want:

  • 8 GB, with or without Special Offers, $20 off (as low as $119)
  • 16 GB, with or without Special Offers, $40 off (as low as $129)

Kindle Fire HDX 7″ (at AmazonSmile)

  • 16 or 32 GB, with or without Special Offers, with or without 4G, $30 off (as low as $199)
  • 64 GB, with or without Special Offers, with or without 4G, $50 off (as low as $259)

Kindle Fire HDX 8.9″ (at AmazonSmile)

  • Any configuration $40 off (as low as $339)

What do I have? The Kindle Fire HDX 7″ with 16GB and Special Offers without 4G, but different people will have different use cases.

I don’t put a lot of movies and such on my device at a time, so the memory has never been an issue for me.

I tried using 4G for a year…it wasn’t worth it for me (you have to pay for a data plan for that). There’s just too much wi-fi in my area to make it a big issue.

I like having the Special Offers…and that’s especially true on the Fire. They do these Limited Time Offers (often, they sell out in seconds…and you get maybe an hour’s warning that it’s going to start)…we’ve literally saved hundreds of dollars that way.

I prefer the HDX over the HD for a number of reasons, not the least of which is Mayday, the live onscreen help option.

I’ve had a Kindle Fire with a bigger screen…I didn’t find that the extra weight and awkwardness of carrying it was worth it for me. I do have the

Amazon Fire TV (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

so it’s easy to throw it on a big screen if I want to do that.

Weirdly, I can’t easily find which accessories are 20% off. There would normally be a link or a section promoted on the main accessories page.

This is advertised as a limited time sale, and may not apply in your country. As always, check before you click or tap that Buy button.

To Kill a Mockingbird (at AmazonSmile) is now for sale legally as an e-book…and at time of writing, it’s only $3.95!

Definitely think about this one as a gift (the price will likely go back up…this is probably a result of price competition at launch)…you can delay the delivery to a date you choose. It’s also a good one for your guest Kindle.

Right now, it’s number 113 paid in the Kindle store. I’ve said I think it may be one of the bestselling e-books of the year, and I’m sticking with that. I think it will have legs (keep selling for a long time), and again, should see an upsurge at gift-giving times.

There was a time when a lot of people were surprised by how expensive older books could be for the Kindle, but I’d say there are some bargains out there now.

I ran a search for literature classics prices from $0.99 to $3.99, and tried to filter out public domain titles:

Under $4 classics (at AmazonSmile)

I did this using

eReaderIQ

which I consider the most valuable resource on the web for Kindleers (I am not associated with that site except as a user, although we have had some correspondence).

Some titles standing out to me in the search:

  • Marathon Man by William Goldman for $2.51 (I wouldn’t consider this a classic, but the publishers get to define the categories for marketing reasons)
  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck for $3.50
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston for $1.99
  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck for $2.50
  • The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath for $2.99
  • As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner for $2.50
  • Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier (that was one of the most wanted on Kindle for a while) for $2.99

If you’d pay that much for a new book and you haven’t read one of these (or you want to re-read it…or give it a gift), why not pay for one that has stood the test of time?

I can tell that, at least in this case, excluding public domain didn’t work very well. :) Many of the books in the search results are in the public domain (not under copyright protection). You can often find those free: but it can be nice to have, say, 10 books in a series in a single volume. That kind of thing is showing up a lot.

Enjoy!

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

KDD: “Summer Reads” $1.99 each

July 6, 2014

KDD: “Summer Reads” $1.99 each

One of today’s

Kindle Daily Deals (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

is what Amazon is calling “Summer Reads”…50 (!) books for $1.99 each.

Every once in a while, the KDD pulls out the stops like this, and gives a great big selection…woo hoo! ;)

They may call these summer reads, but there is very likely to be something here that you want to read…and something that you want to give as a gift. Remember that you can delay the arrival of a gift to a date you choose: this is a nice way to add in a little extra something on a birthday or other occasion.

Check the price before you click or tap that “Buy button”. These prices may not apply in your country (I have readers around the world), and it’s possible for a book to move in and out of the list. Also, this is a Daily Deal. Come Monday, these prices will likely be higher again.

I’m just going to point some that caught my eye:

  • Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
  • Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank
  • Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin
  • The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester
  • The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver
  • The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder
  • The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon
  • The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing
  • Truth & Beauty by Ann Patchett
  • The Writing Life by Annie Dillard
  • A Brief History of Thought: A Philosophical Guide to Living by Luc Perry
  • Dust Tracks on the Road by Zora Neale Hurston
  • The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America’s Childhood by Jane Leavy
  • The Round House by Louise Erdrich
  • The Summer of Naked Swim Parties by Jessica Anya Blau
  • The Devil and Miss Prym by Paulo Coelho
  • The Secret of Chanel No. 5: The Intimate History of the World’s Most Famous Perfume by Tilar J. Mazzeo
  • The Templars by Michael Haag
  • Everything Is Wrong with Me: A Memoir of an American Childhood Gone, Well, Wrong by Jason Mulgrew

Again, that’s only a partial listing. :)

While I could write about several of these, I’ll just call out Alas, Babylon (at AmazonSmile) in particular. 4.5 stars out of 5, 733 customer reviews at the time of writing…that’s a very good score, and indicates contemporary interest in it.

Why do I mention the latter?

The book is about fifty-five years old, having been first published in 1959.

While certainly informed by its period, it still affects modern readers with its post-nuclear war setting.

It’s also been said that it impacted John Lennon’s anti-war stance.

I’m not quite sure why it would be more appropriate in summer than in winter, though. :) Many people actually have read it as school reading over the years.

That’s an interesting question for me: do you look for different things to read in the summer? Traditionally, that’s a time for lighter fare, for “popcorn books” and “beach reads”.

I think the idea goes back to having been in school. Supposedly, during the school year, your mind is focused on heavy studies…and then it needs a “vacation” during the summer.

That never quite worked for me: I read recreationally during the school year, too, and might actually read more intellectual books during the summer. The books that were assigned weren’t always stretching my mind, so I might find more challenging ones on my own…and when I wasn’t as tied up with other school obligations.

Oh, I suppose there might have been some desire to have some lighter books that were easier to pack. ;) However, I generally traveled with one suitcase just for books, and taking hardbacks was certainly something I did.

How freeing e-books are for that! I can easily take a hundred books, and ones that are a thousand pages long, without worrying about baggage overweight charges. ;)

Anyway, take a look at the full list of these books today…

Enjoy!

What about you? Do you read differently during the summer? Do you want something lighter or heavier? Which book(s) on this list would you recommend? Are you buying any of them for gifts for people? I always suggest that, and I do it myself, but I wonder how many people actually buy something in July to arrive in, say, December? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to th

Monthly Kindle Deals for $3.99 or less each: July 2014

July 4, 2014

Monthly Kindle Deals for $3.99 or less each: June 2014

Amazon does the Kindle Daily Deal (at AmazonSmile…benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*), which discounts (usually) four books a day (often general fiction, a romance, a science fiction/fantasy book, and a kids’ book).

They’ve also been doing Monthly Kindle Book Deals for $3.99 or less each) (at AmazonSmile). That’s a rebranding: they used to say it was “100 Books”, but that’s also gotten to be more…there are 121 (one more than last month) for this month at the time of writing.

Those prices only apply to the USA, and one weird thing is that some of the books seem to sell out at that price sometimes (or become unavailable for some other reason).

It’s also interesting…about 49% of the books in the USA Kindle store are $3.99 or less (1,295,250 of 2,661,124). Still, these are on sale, and that’s worth something. :)

I’m going to list some of the $3.99 or lower ones that caught my eye…I’m not necessarily recommending them, but I do think they are interesting.

The ones I list also don’t block text-to-speech access**…but I think blocking it is becoming rarer. However, as I worked through the list this time, I was very disappointed to see a large number of books by Simon & Schuster that had blocked the access. I’ll have to look at that more carefully, and hope it isn’t part of a trend.

America the Beautiful: Rediscovering What Made This Nation Great (at AmazonSmile)
by Ben Carson, M.D.
politics & government – commentary and opinion
4.8 out of 5 stars, 2,409 customer reviews
$1.99 at time of writing

I’ve noticed that faith-based books (this is published by Zondervan) tend to have good customer reviews, but this is really an unusual average for this many reviews. I suppose sales may be up for the 4th of July, but I don’t know that that tends to raise the average of the reviews.

Racing in the Rain (at AmazonSmile)
by Garth Stein
children’s books (really? I would not classify this as a children’s book by any means…the publishers make that choice)
4.6 stars, 618 reviews
$1.99 at time of writing

I read this one in 2012: Review: The Art of Racing in the Rain.

Ella Enchanted (at AmazonSmile)
by Gail Carson Levine
children’s books
4.8 stars, 1,310 reviews
$1.99

This one is a children’s book…and a Newbery winner.

Oddkins: A Fable for All Ages
by Dean Koontz, illustrated by Phil Parks
children’s books
4.7 stars, 163 reviews
$1.99 at time of writing

Koontz might not be the first person you think of when you consider authors that could cross over for kids…but this was (Koontz’ first book for “young readers”) has been well received.

The Lords of Discipline (at AmazonSmile)
by Pat Conroy
literary fiction
4.6 stars, 387 reviews
$2.24 at time of writing

Not an easy book to read, certainly, but one that has stood the test of time.

Some others:

  • Touching Spirit Bear by Ben Mikaelsen
  • The Berenstain Bears and the Forgiving Tree by Jan and Mike (not Stan) Berenstain…even though this is illustrated, text-to-speech is enabled
  • Rod: The Autobiography by Rod Stewart
  • Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume
  • Plain Truth by Jodi Picoult
  • The Ladies’ Room by Carolyn Brown
  • Topaz by Leon Uris
  • A Season in H*ll by Jack Higgins
  • Pines by Blake Crouch
  • Children of the Night by Mercedes Lackey

If there were others you’d like to mention for me and my readers, please comment on this post.

Bonus deal for eligible Prime membersKindle First (at AmazonSmile). As an eligible Prime member, you can get (to own…not to borrow, like the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library) one of four yet to be published books. This month, those free books include: Inamorata by Megan Chance (historical fiction); As Red As Blood by Salla Simukka (young adult thriller); Rain Girl by Gabi Kreshlehner (mystery); and The Empty Quarter by David L. Robbins (thriller).

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

** A Kindle with text-to-speech can read any text downloaded to it…unless that access is blocked by the publisher inserting code into the file to prevent it. That’s why you can have the device read personal documents to you (I’ve done that). I believe that this sort of access blocking disproportionately disadvantages the disabled, although I also believe it is legal (provided that there is at least one accessible version of each e-book available, however, that one can require a certification of disability). For that reason, I don’t deliberately link to books which block TTS access here (although it may happen accidentally, particularly if the access is blocked after I’ve linked it). I do believe this is a personal decision, and there  are legitimate arguments for purchasing those books. 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Round up #260: kids’ books at Food Banks, B&N splits, app giveaway

June 28, 2014

Round up  #260: kids’ books at Food Banks, B&N splits, app giveaway

The ILMK Round ups are short pieces which may or may not be expanded later.

Barnes & Noble “consciously uncouples” from NOOK

According to Barnes & Nobles’

press release

and other sources (including a Jeffrey Trachtenberg piece in the WSJ which was behind a paywall), they plan to split into two entities by the end of the first calendar quarter of next year.

One part will be NOOK Media (the devices and the content), and the other part will be the retail segment, which includes the brick-and-mortar stores.

It seems that the new sail (the NOOK) with which they had outfitted their corporate ship has become an anchor. ;)

This short excerpt tells the tale:

“Device and accessories sales were $25 million for the quarter and $260 million for the full year, declining 30.1% and 44.8%, respectively, due to lower selling volume and lower average selling prices. Digital content sales were $62 million for the quarter and $246 million for the full year, declining 18.7% and 20.6%, respectively, due primarily to lower device unit sales.”

On the other hand, the retail segment was definitely…um…less bad. ;) Core comparable sales were down 3.1%, but overall, things were pretty flat…which is a considerable improvement.

The stock rose, according to CNN Money

http://money.cnn.com/quote/quote.html?symb=BKS

over 13% this week…and it’s risen more than 50% this year.

Not everybody thinks this is the death knell of the NOOK

Motley Fool article by Dan Newman

but it’s not exactly a victory march, either. ;)

Barnes & Noble is having a NOOK book sales on beach reads…and since Amazon tends to match prices, that means they are likely to be discounted in the Kindle store as well. I did check, and did see the price matching, although I didn’t check them all:

Barnes & Noble Beach Reads sale

Here are a few of the ninety titles:

  • Oceans Apart by Karen Kingsbury
  • Summer Rental by Mary Kay Andrews
  • Big Girl Panties by Stephanie Evanovich
  • Four Friends by Robyn Carr
  • Unnatural Death by Dorothy L. Sayers

E-book revenues more than three times mass market revenues in 2013

This

Publishers Weekly article by Jim Milliot

has the stats from the Book Industry Study Group for 2013.

Sales in the trade sector (this group doesn’t include textbooks, kids books, or professional/scholarly books) dropped 2.3% (we’re talking about cash, not units), but other sectors grew.

In terms of formats, I’ve written before about how e-books are largely replacing mass market paperbacks as far as market positioning goes: relatively cheap and convenient. MMPs were down another 6.7% to $781 million…which you can compare to e-books having $3.03 billion.

Hardbacks (again, we’re talking revenue, not units) were still much higher than e-books, at $5.14 billion.

I don’t want to take too much away from the article…if you like to see these sorts of stats, I recommend it.

Through Saturday: over $100 worth of apps for free!

Amazon alerted me through e-mail (which I really appreciate…it lets me help you) about thirty-one apps they are giving away, just through tomorrow (Saturday).

There are always lots of free apps at Amazon, of course, but these are ones for which you would normally pay.

Over $100 in apps…free (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

I just figure I’ll go ahead and get all of the ones, if I don’t already have them. With apps,  you can get them for “Cloud Only”, so they don’t take up any memory on your devices unless you choose to use them.

This set includes apps that are generally pretty well-rated, and it has Splashtop and a Sonic the Hedgehog game.

One interesting thing: some apps (like Plex, which is part of this deal) are compatible both with my

Kindle Fire HDX (at AmazonSmile*)

and my

Amazon Fire TV (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Since it’s basically the same operating system, I suspect that some of the apps I already own for my KFHDX will also work with my

Amazon Fire Phone (at AmazonSmile)

when I get it at the end of July.

They won’t all be cross-compatible: if a game/app is designed to work with the Fire Phones dynamic perspective (which I call “dyper”), it won’t be able to do the same thing on the Kindle Fire. They might be able to make two different versions of it available, though, which it would seem like must be the case with the Fire TV and the Kindle Fire.

Children’s books given away at Food Banks

I love this story!

When our now adult kid would have birthday parties growing up, we normally did them at the Food Bank (that was our kid’s choice). It was actually a lot of fun. We would reserve a time, and we’d show up with maybe ten or fifteen people (kids and guardians). We would sort food donations and box them up. It was hard work, and you had to do it right (one big part was checking expiration dates, and looking for damaged containers…like moldy peanut butter). We got to bring our own music, though, and we could crank it up! We’d spend an hour or so (I think that’s right), and end up with a whole palette of food for people!

Afterwards, we’d invite people out to pizza or something like that.

It felt really good to be able to help.

Well, it would have felt even better if we could have given out toys, too, which is what happened recently in England, according to this

The Telegraph story by Martin Chilton

The book that was given away was Super Duck, by Jez Alborough (not available in a Kindle edition), which I understand is popular in England.

When we buy our Toys for Tots donation every year, I do think it’s a good thing to get well-known brands, like Spider-Man. I just figure that has to make the kids feel more “normal”, since many of them see the commercials just like everybody else.

Bravo to the charity Booktrust for arranging this!

Lemony Snicket endorses Spencer Collins

Daniel Handler (A.K.A. Lemony Snicket (at AmazonSmile)) provided verbal support to our

ILMK Reader Hero #3

Spencer Collins, according to this

Huffington Post article by Ed Mazza

That likely ups Spencer’s cool quotient with the kids…not that Spencer needs that. You may recall that our Reader Hero put up a Little Free Library…and it was ordered taken down by the City Council. This issue is still unresolved (you can click our link above to add your support), but we particularly salute Spencer for approaching this by reading up on city codes to work within the system and in a mature and responsible way.

Full disclosure: one of my relatives knows Daniel Handler, although we’ve never met.

Mary Rodgers reported dead

Mary Rodgers (at AmazonSmile)

the author of Freaky Friday (not available in a Kindle edition) and a handful of children’s books, including the sequel

Freaky Monday (at AmazonSmile)

has reportedly died.

The book was a bestseller, and was adapted memorably more than once (some of will think first of Jodie Foster…others of Lindsay Lohan).

She also wrote plays (including Once Upon a Mattress), and was the child of Richard Rodgers (of “and Hammerstein” fame).

The book will live on.

The Measured Circle free Flipboard magazine continues to grow

On Monday, I gave you an

Update on my free Flipboard magazines

Well, the readership continues to grow! I have to say, this may be the most dynamic growth of anything I’ve done creatively.

The Measured Circle magazine at Flipboard

had 716 readers on Monday…and 1,109 at time of writing! That’s more than half again.

Interesting… :)

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Heads up! LTO Acer Chromebook for $59! 3:15 Pacific

June 25, 2014

Heads up! LTO Acer Chromebook for $59! 3:15 Pacific

These are going to sell out quickly at $59!

It’s an Acer Chromebook for $59 (usually $199.99) for $59 (70% off).

They are only doing 5,000 of these.

A Chromebook is a laptop that is really web-based. You aren’t going to use it to install software like you are used to doing with old laptops, and you don’t store a lot of files on it. If you just want something to access things on the web, though, these are good.

The one I think it is (Acer C720 Chromebook (11.6-Inch, 2GB), but I can’t tell for sure) has a very respectable 4.4 stars with 1,354 customer reviews.

Buy this for yourself, or for a gift…or it could be a really valuable donation.

These are special limited time offers, which are only available to Kindle Fire owners.

What happens is you can get a text to alert you to an upcoming deal (details in the links below). You don’t get much warning…maybe an hour (about half an hour in this case).

The deal also appears on the sleep screen of your Fire, and you can find it under Offers on the homescreen (all the way at the end).

Then, you say you want to “learn more”. You’ll get to a screen with a countdown clock. As soon as the clock gets to zero, you need to click to have a chance to get it.

They have typically been selling out in seconds.

Here is information on the program:

As I’ve written before, I look at these LTOs (Limited Time Offers) sort of like buying a lottery ticket: I don’t expect to get one (win), but its exciting if I do! Of course, the “ticket” doesn’t cost me anything.

These LTOs are one of the best arguments for having Special Offers…and yes, a good argument for having a  Fire (at AmazonSmile)!

Did you get one? Do you have any other comment on this? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

One more thing: I’ve had a couple of readers say that they never even saw the offer. As far as I know, these go out to every eligible Kindle Fire in the USA. A few possibilities occur to me:

  • They either bought a Kindle Fire without Special Offers, or bought out of the offers later. You have to be subscribed to those in order to get these deals
  • They weren’t connected to wireless in time for it to update
  • They didn’t check the Offers tab (I don’t always see it on the sleep screen)

It might not have been any of those, but those three would have done it.

===

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Round up #259: read to your kids, Prince of Tides

June 25, 2014

Round up #259: read to your kids, Prince of Tides

The ILMK Round ups are short pieces which may or may not be expanded later.

KDD: Prince of Tides

One of today’s Kindle Daily Deals (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) is

The Prince of Tides (at AmazonSmile)
by Pat Conroy
4.5 stars out of 5, 501 customer reviews
$1.99 at time of writing

Very successful and made into a movie, this is a good one for your guest Kindle, or just for a read for you. :) It’s almost thirty years old at this point: I’m sure some people wonder why a “classic” like this isn’t available legally free on line. ;)

Supreme Court rules against Aereo

According to this

The Guardian article by Dominic Rushe

and other sources (I have the TV on in the other room while I write this, so I can listen to CNN), the Supreme Court has just ruled against “rebroadcaster” Aereo.

This is a copyright issue at heart, and I think a lot of people generally expect those to go in the direction of more access in the future…but this one didn’t.

For example, my guess is that it is legal to digitize a p-book (paperbook) you own to turn in into a digital file for your own use (sort of like using a DVR to record a broadcast program), but to my knowledge, that has not been established. I’ve been thinking that it will be solidly established at some point, and nobody is hunting anybody down at this point, but it hasn’t happened yet.

This is a bit different, though, because Aereo is a commercial enterprise.

Aereo uses antennae to pick up over the air signals, and then stream them to subscribers.

They argued that they were an antennae company, not a streaming company…at least, that’s my understanding. Picking up the signals by antenna is legal, of course: it’s the way they got to consumers that was in question.

This could impact literary content, at some point, as hardware becomes more capable of digitizing things. That ability will be one of things I test early on my Amazon Fire Phone (at AmazonSmile)…on something in the public domain.

13 single issues of magazines, $0.99 each

I do read magazines on my

Kindle Fire HDX (at AmazonSmile*)

both from the Kindle store, and from Zinio.

I often mention the roughly ten thousand paperbooks I have on shelves in  our home…but I also have quite a few old magazines.

Many years ago, there was a store going out of business (I think) in my town, and I bought a wooden magazine shelf…I think I paid $5 for it.

I’m sure we’ve paid more than that in gas hauling it around when we’ve moved over the years. ;)

It’s about a person tall and a couple of people wide, and has a lot of horizontal slots…you can put maybe ten issues of a magazine in one, and still see the top one to see what title it is.

My intuition, though, is that some people haven’t even tried magazines on their Kindle Fires.

One reason for that is that the experience on a non-Fire Kindle just didn’t approach that of paper.

For me, the Fire’s experience of reading a glossy magazine often exceeds paper.

Yes, one reason is the “digital extras” you may get. I’ve been an

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY (at AmazonSmile)

for a very long time. I’m not usually big on watching the trailers they include, but I do listen to song samples sometimes. They also may include a video interview, and that can be quite an enhancement.

Pictures look great, and while not all magazines give you the text + pictures mode of

National Geographic (at AmazonSmile)

I’ve been able to zoom photos and have used that to show off the Fire’s screen. On the HDX, you can triple tap pretty much any screen (not videos) to magnify it, then use two fingers together to drag it around.

Why don’t more people read magazines on their Fires?

While you can get a 14-day free trial (or thirty day, in some cases), those renew automatically…and I think it concerns people. A year-long subscription is a lot more than most people pay for an e-book.

Amazon is having a

Ninety-nine cent single issue sale (at AmazonSmile)

for one week only.

I’ve bought a couple of single issues of magazines and newspapers from the Kindle store over the years. There was something specific in them that I wanted, but I didn’t really want a subscription.

Well, if you want to try out reading a magazine without worrying about a renewal, you may want to get one of these during the sale:

  • Eating Well
  • More
  • Do it Yourself
  • Family Circle
  • Better Homes and Gardens
  • Every Day with Rachel Ray
  • Fitness
  • Traditional Home
  • allrecipes
  • FamilyFun
  • Midwest Living
  • Parents
  • Wood – by Better Homes & Gardens (um…it may be a good thing they included the subtitle…) ;)

Michael Hart, The Grandfather of E-Books

This is a nice

Bidness Etc. article by Zoe Jacobson

about Michael Hart, who created Project Gutenberg…which is the reason we have so many free classics legally available to us today.

The article also talks about e-books generally.

I recommend it, although you may need to sign-up to be able to read the whole thing.

AAP recommends reading to your child

I used to work for The American Academy of Pediatrics, so I should mention that first.

According to this

NPR piece with Audie Cornish…transcript and audio

the AAP is specifically recommending reading to children, even infants, every day.

Absolutely.

Not every adult serious reader was read to as a child, but many of us were…and I do think it matters.

They are talking about linguistic development for one thing. Let me give you some of my thoughts on that part of it.

When we read we use many words we might not otherwise use…it’s why so many of us appear to be British when we write, when we may never have been there. ;)

Also, when we read to a child, we are speaking steadily for a period of time. The focus is on words: the words on the page for us, but the words in our mouths for the child. How many people have a “conversation” with a pre-verbal child that lasts as long as

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (at AmazonSmile)

With older children, you are really modeling the act of reading, in addition to other positive elements. When you see the adults in your life reading as, say, a five-year old, you want to read, too. One great thing is that when kids are trying to establish themselves as separate from their intellectual guardians, I don’t think they tend to do that by becoming non-readers…they just read different things. Once you are a reader, you tend to stay a reader, I believe. Reading is like interacting with another person…just time delayed. ;) Not very many people stop talking to other people…

What do you think? Is digitizing a book for your own use legal? Do you read magazines on a tablet…or perhaps on an non-Fire Kindle? Do you haul old issues of magazines around with you from house to house…and if so, do you ever pull them out and read them again (I do)? Were you the first serious reader in your family? If so, what got you started? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 


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