Snapshot: June 1 2010

Snapshot: June 1 2010
 
I generally run this information through Jungle-Search (it’s just easier than Amazon), and there are some vagaries in the searches (both there and on Amazon). I do try and run it the same way every time, so unless Amazon changes something, it should give you a pretty good idea.

Titles in the Kindle Store     

Kindle store title counts

Kindle Store Titles

Kindle store titles 

June 1 2010: 596,300
May 1 2010: 509,229
April 1 2010: 476,653
March 1 2010: 450,625
February 1 2010: 415,100
January 1 2010: 401773
December 1 2009: 385,484
November 1 2009: 368,813
October 1 2009: 342,865
September 21 2009: 355,805
July 28 2009: 332,813
May 16 2009: 284,491 

Approximate average of titles added per day:     

May: 2,809 (may be affected by Penguin return)
April: 1,086
March:  840
February: 1,146
January: 430 (may be impacted by Macmillan removal)
December: 525
November: 556
October: 837  

  
Magazines: 

June 1 2010: 60
May 1 2010: 58
April 1 2010: 53
March 1 2010: 50
February 1 2010: 46
January 1 2010: 43
December 1 2009: 40
November 1 2009: 38 

Newspapers: 

June 1 2010: 133
May 1 2010: 128
April 1 2010: 118
March 1 2010: 107
February 1 2010: 93
January 1 2010: 89
December 1 2009: 76
November 1 2009: 58    

Blogs:    

June 1 2010: 9,228
May 1 2010: 9,094
April 1 2010: 8,944
March 1 2010: 8,754
February 1 2010: 8,651
January 1 2010: 7992
December 1 2009: 7589
November 1 2009: 7365    

Percentage of books priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars    

May: 86.8% (462,359 of 532,646)
April: 84.8% (377,624 of 445,421)
March: 83.9% (413,302 of 346,665)
February: 84.2% (328,597 of 390,178)
January: 83.4% (295,634 of 354,499)
December: 83.1% (283,497 of 341,112)
November: 82.8% (268,366 of 324,230)
October: 82.2% (252,511 of 307,241)
September: 82.0% (239,666 of 292318)
August: 83.2% (245,524 of 295,210)    

Percentage of books with a publication date of the previous month priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars    

Books for May: 94.9% (24,436 of 25,737)
Books for April: 95.9% (23,695 of 24,714)
Books for March: 96.0% (23,703 of 24,699)
Books for February: 96.5% (26,850 of 27,815)
Books for January: 93.3% (11,857 of 12,704)
Books for December: 90.6% (8,948 of 9,879)
Books for November: 94.1% (11,520 of 12,239)
Books for October: 91.2% (6,789 of 7,445)
Books for September: 91.0% (5,104 of 5,608)
Books for August: 96.4% (20,239 of 21,079)    

Books in the Seventy Percent Royalty Range ($2.99 – $9.99)    

June 1: 57.1% (340,379 of 596,300)
May 1:  51.4% (261,869 of 509,229)
April 1: 51.1% (243,718 of 476,653)
March 1: 52.5% (236,418 of 450,625)
February 1: 50.8% (210,978 of 415,100)    

Books from one penny to $2.98    

June 1: 20.5% (121,981 of 596,300)
May 1: 22.7% (115,756 of 509,229)
April 1: 21.6% (102,948 of 476,653)
March 1: 20.5% (92,180 of 450,625)
February 1: 20.4% (84,721 of 415,100)     

Textbooks in the Kindle Store 

June 1 2010: 6,249
May 1 2010: 6,117
April 1 2010: 5,973
March 1 2010: 5,728
February 1 2010: 5,673
January 1 2010: 5,549
December 1 2009: 4,892
November 1 2009: 4,768
October 1 2009: 4,633
September 24 2009: 4,678
August 11 2009: 4,381    

Free books (including public domain)     

June 1 2010: 20,590
May 1 2010: 20,601
April 1 2010: 20,619
March 1 2010: 20,143
February 1 2010: 19788
January 1 2010: 19,802
December 1 2009: 19,895
November 1 2009: 18,547
October 1 2009: 7,428
February 28 2009: 7,401     

Free books (without public domain)      

June 1 2010: 559 (63 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
May 1 2010: 556 (57 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
April 1 2010: 560 (59 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
March 1 2010: 67
February 1 2010: 52
January 1 2010: 53
December 1 2009: 84
November 1 2009: 64
October 1 2009: 67    

Spanish edition books*    

June 1 2010: 4,078
May 1 2010: 3,735
April 1 2010: 3,383
March 1 2010: 2,841
February 1 2010: 2,548
January 1 2010: 2,363
December 1 2009: 3,483    

Price Point Analysis   

April 1 2010 was “Agency Day”, when the pricing system for some of the largest trade publishers in the US changed.  I’ve started tracking price points, to see how that is affecting things.  These are not ranges: it’s how many books are at a specific price point.

  4/1/2010    
Total 476653    
Prime 413032    
Under $10 346665    
  83.9%    
       
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   43,993 9.17% 0.01%
 $        1.99     7,704 1.61% 0.00%
 $        2.99   14,560 3.03% 0.00%
 $        3.99   17,390 3.62% -0.02%
 $        4.99     9,758 2.03% -0.01%
 $        5.99     2,691 0.56% 0.00%
 $        6.99     1,800 0.38% 0.00%
 $        7.99   10,927 2.28% -0.25%
 $        8.99     1,312 0.27% 0.00%
 $        9.99   51,857 10.80% -0.26%
 $      10.99       191 0.04% 0.00%
 $      11.99       196 0.04% 0.00%
 $      12.99       308 0.06% 0.00%
 $      13.99         93 0.02% 0.00%
 $      14.99       806 0.17% 0.00%
 $      15.99       114 0.02% 0.00%
 $      16.99         67 0.01% 0.00%
 $      17.99         43 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99         21 0.00% 0.00%
 $      19.99       201 0.04% 0.00%
 $      20.99         11 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         11 0.00% 0.00%
 $      22.99         21 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           5 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99         50 0.01% 0.00%

5/1/2010      
Total 509229    
Prime 445421    
Under $10 377624    
  84.80%    
       
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99  58,853 11.56% 2.39%
 $        1.99    8,859 1.74% 0.13%
 $        2.99  16,168 3.17% 0.14%
 $        3.99  17,666 3.47% -0.15%
 $        4.99  10,171 2.00% -0.04%
 $        5.99    3,106 0.61% 0.05%
 $        6.99    2,400 0.47% 0.10%
 $        7.99  13,433 2.64% 0.36%
 $        8.99    1,521 0.30% 0.03%
 $        9.99  54,529 10.71% -0.10%
 $      10.99       433 0.09% 0.05%
 $      11.99       607 0.12% 0.08%
 $      12.99       713 0.14% 0.08%
 $      13.99        88 0.02% 0.00%
 $      14.99       892 0.18% 0.01%
 $      15.99       121 0.02% 0.00%
 $      16.99        99 0.02% 0.01%
 $      17.99        71 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99        26 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99       214 0.04% 0.00%
 $      20.99        11 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99        14 0.00% 0.00%
 $      22.99        14 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99          5 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99        57 0.01% 0.00%

6/1/2010      
Total 596300    
Prime 532646    
Under $10 462359    
  86.80%    
       
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99  56,919 9.55% -2.01%
 $        1.99  10,905 1.83% 0.09%
 $        2.99  17,693 2.97% -0.21%
 $        3.99  18,512 3.10% -0.36%
 $        4.99  10,462 1.75% -0.24%
 $        5.99    3,435 0.58% -0.03%
 $        6.99    2,438 0.41% -0.06%
 $        7.99  13,536 2.27% -0.37%
 $        8.99    1,606 0.27% -0.03%
 $        9.99  57,914 9.71% -1.00%
 $      10.99       450 0.08% -0.01%
 $      11.99       698 0.12% 0.00%
 $      12.99       987 0.17% 0.03%
 $      13.99       107 0.02% 0.00%
 $      14.99       947 0.16% -0.02%
 $      15.99       129 0.02% 0.00%
 $      16.99       109 0.02% 0.00%
 $      17.99        53 0.01% -0.01%
 $      18.99        26 0.00% 0.00%
 $      19.99       239 0.04% 0.00%
 $      20.99          8 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99        12 0.00% 0.00%
 $      22.99        15 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99          7 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99        62 0.01% 0.00%

Summary      

The stand-out stat to me is the increase in the number of titles added per day: it didn’t quite triple, but it was kind of close.  That’s only partly attributable to the Penguin books returning…my guess is that those were a couple of thousand titles (the ones released after March 31, 2010), although I haven’t done the analysis.  I’d guess the iPad has a bigger impact, as a new market for the Kindle store (through the free app).  It’s also just a case of the backlist getting added, I would guess. 

You can also see that the number of books at exactly $9.99 has dropped a full percent…that’s a lot.  Also, books at ninety-nine cents have dropped even more.  I would have guessed that was because of books moving into the 70% range ($2.99 to $9.99), but that doesn’t appear to be it.  That higher rate isn’t available yet, so we may still see that change. 

Otherwise, things largely kept plodding along.  One notable statistic: the percentage of books in my prime range (one penny to fifty dollars) that were under ten dollars actually went up two percent.  Anecdotally, a number of books have gone up in price for Penguin since the switch to the Agency Model.  My intuition there is that it is the addition of backlist books, which may tend to be under $9.99, that balances the increase in prices on the frontlist.  

No more big loose ends on publishers, so we’ll see how this goes as we go forward.  We’ll also see what the impact is of the seventy percent royalty rate for independently published books through Amazon’s Digital Text Platform, coming this summer. 

Notes     

  • Data was typically drawn using Jungle-Search.com. There are a number of possible sources of errors (JS, Amazon, me), but these are probably pretty good
  • The free books referenced here are from the Kindle store: there are many other sources for free books
  • My search for textbooks definitely has false positives (books that aren’t really textbooks). I search for -domain (to eliminate public domain titles, which would be older books, generall) textbook. That would find a book about textbooks, for example
  • I searched for “Spanish edition” to find Spanish language books. That has some false positives as well
  • I look at price percentages of books in the range of one penny to fifty dollars, to eliminate freebies and limit textbooks
  • The price point analysis is for books at that specific price: it does not represent a range of prices
  • I compared the percentage of price points in the Price Point Analysis when I showed the difference…not the number of books
  • This information is based on what a United States customer sees

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. 

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