Flash! You can now reset your “furthest page read” yourself

Flash! You can now reset your “furthest page read” yourself

Thanks to *~*Pineapple*~* in the Amazon Kindle forum for the heads-up on this!

Part of the Kindle Service is something called “Whispersync”. It allows you to be reading a book on one device, and then pick up in the same spot where you left off on another device.

That works very well if one person is reading the same book on multiple devices (a Kindle and a SmartPhone, for example…I’ve done it with a Kindle Fire and a Kindle Touch).

One negative is if two different people on the account are going to read the same book on different devices at the same time.

Another problem is when you finish a book, and you’d like to re-read it. We’ve always been able to go back to the beginning, but Whispersync might want to synchronize it to the end before we finished the re-read.

A third issue is when someone clicks or taps an endnote, jumps to the end of the book…and then goes Home before going Back to where they were. This will set the “last page read” to the end of the book.

What we’ve had to do in the past was contact Kindle Support

http://www.amazon.com/kindlesupport

and ask them to reset it.

Now, we can do it ourselves!

If you go to

http://www.amazon.com/manageyourkindle

there are all sorts of magical things there. 🙂

Find a title there, and click or tap the

Actions…

button.

There is a new option to

Reset Furthest* Page Read

If you select that, it sort of explains it. If you choose to do it, it will reset the page for you.

The help says;

“To reset your furthest page read in Manage Your Kindle, click the Actions button next to the title and choose “Reset furthest page read” from the dropdown menu. The next time you open that title on a device, the page where it opens will become the new furthest page read that syncs across all your devices and apps.”

Amazon help page

That language suggests to me that it would not just reset it to the first page, but to wherever you happened to be when you went to MYK.

That doesn’t quite make sense to me. Two people could have the book on different devices and be in different places…how would it know which page to use?

I’m not in a place where I can test this right now, but I’ll try it later.

Once again, Amazon makes things easier for their customers! I thought it was really terrific when they let us “return” books from MYK within seven days of purchase…this is also nice. 🙂

* “Furthest” should really be “Farthest”, of course…and there aren’t any pages in e-books. 🙂 That’s just a pedantic quibble, though

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

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13 Responses to “Flash! You can now reset your “furthest page read” yourself”

  1. JamesJames Says:

    Best news ever! Now I can finally go to end notes without being afraid my furthest page read will get set permanently to the end of the book.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, JamesJames!

      Thanks for letting me know! I’m always happy when I can help somebody. 🙂

  2. Pam Says:

    Maybe you have to shut off the Whispersync of the device you don’t want to track and leave it on on the device you DO want to track and then go to MYK and do the adjustment. Not sure…

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Pam!

      You control Whispersync centrally, rather than device by device. It’s either on or not on for the account. If you don’t sync your device, that would work. I hope to test this soon.

      To change Whispersync, you do it at

      http://www.amazon.com/manageyourkindle

      then go to

      Manage Your Devices

      It’s down at the bottom.

  3. Kathleen Says:

    Not sure how I can tell you about something since I don’t see an email address — so I’ll comment here and hope you see it. A friend just sent me an email about a Wall St Journal article: WSJ TECHNOLOGY ALERT: U.S. Warns Apple, Publishers on E-Book Pricing. Check it out!! It’s finally happening!!

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Kathleen!

      That worked. 🙂 If you do want to reach me, I suggest on the blogsite that people comment on the About page. I see all the comments that are done on the blog pretty quickly, and I’m much more likely to get to them than I am to e-mail. I also tell people that if they want it to be private, they should clearly tell me that in the beginning of the post.

      I’d written an article on that before I saw your comment, but yours may have come in while I was writing it.

      Thanks so much for giving me the heads-up! That’s really appreciated.

  4. Roger Knights Says:

    “Another problem is when you finish a book, and you’d like to re-read it. We’ve always been able to go back to the beginning, but Whispersync might want to synchronize it to the end before we finished the re-read.”

    How about this? When the user presses Home a pop-up appears (if the last page read is beyond where he’s at now) asking, “Return here next time the book is opened?” A second press of Home would implicitly answer Yes. Otherwise, a press of Return (or Delete?) or a click on an on-screen option would take the returnee to the last page read.

    “A third issue is when someone clicks or taps an endnote, jumps to the end of the book…and then goes Home before going Back to where they were. This will set the “last page read” to the end of the book.”

    Here’s a possible partial solution:

    1. Allow publishers to insert a “back-matter” marker. It would come before any Bibliographies, Notes, Indexes, Appendixes, etc. Users should also be allowed to insert that marker, since existing books lack it.

    2. Any time the reader made excursions beyond that marker, the “last-page-read” counter would not be updated.

    3. Optional: A separate counter would keep track of the most recent back-matter place visited.

    4. Optional: A new menu option would let the user Go To Most Recent Place in Back Matter–in case he wanted to return to something he was reading there.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Roger!

      Well, I do like how you are always trying to come up with new solutions.

      On your first one, I think that would have to be a user choice to activate it. If not, you add friction. Even if the box goes away on its own if ignored for a second, that just teaches people to never use it. As someone who trains people to use software, I would be quite surprised if this achieved the twin goals of increasing people’s satisfaction with the software and produces the desired result.

      On your second, I think that’s a good idea…to let the software know what is the “back matter” of the book. I think it would be intuitive to use the term “back matter” to refer to that information which is usually in the “back” of the book. This would cost money to develop, of course, and might degrade performance slightly…since it has to think about which section to mark, as well as which position. It’s an interesting concept, though…thanks!

      • Roger Knights Says:

        You’re right about the “friction” problem with my first suggestion. I regretted it an hour or so after posting it. (I often only start to think hard about what I’m saying AFTER I’ve said it!) Anyway, here’s what I’ve come up with in the interim:
        ——–

        “Last page read” is ambiguous. It could mean the most recent page read, or it could mean the highest-numbered page read. Amazon’s interpretation is most recent page read, which means that when one returns to the book one won’t be taken to the last (highest-numbered) page read, but only the latest (most recent) page read, if one exited from the most recent location by pressing Home.

        So it would help if Amazon added a new option in the Go To menu: Highest Page Read, so there would be a convenient way to get there if one wanted to. This would also be useful during the current session, in certain circumstances.

        In addition, when reading, one sometimes goes to a considerably later place in the book, but one that is lower than the highest page EVER read. If one has used Back to return from it, there’s often no way, or no speedy way, to get back to that high-numbered page.

        So it would help if Amazon added another new option in the Go To menu: Highest Page Read in Current Session.

      • Roger Knights Says:

        I’m glad you liked my “back matter” suggestion. Here are two spin-offs:

        1. Add a new operand to Go To: Back Matter. This would take the user to the start of that section, whence he could advance to subsections within it by hitting the right arrow key. (Assuming publishers remembered to use chapter markers at the start of each subsection.)

        2. Create a parallel section, Front Matter. (This term already exists in the publishing world, along with Back Matter.) Go To Beginning would take the user to the start of the Front Matter. (It should be Go To Front Matter, but it’s too late to change, I fear.) Go to Book-Body (a new command) would take the user to the first page of the text of the book, after the Intro, TOC, etc.

      • Roger Knights Says:

        Oops–regarding #2 above (and proving my comment about my not thinking hard before posting): Actually, Go To Cover corresponds to Go To Front Matter, and Go To Beginning corresponds to Go To Book-Body, so the new operands aren’t needed. But I still like the idea of having a section that differentiates front matter from the rest.

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