Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz

Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz

I recently wrote about the sudden popularity of George Orwell’s 1984 (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*):

1984 is sold out in hardback & paperback at Amazon…but Kindleers can read it for free

There were some great comments in response (reading and responding to respectful comments is one of my favorite things about doing this blog).

One of them questioningly connected the CBS reality show Big Brother with 1984.

That interested me, and shouldn’t have surprised me.

It’s one of the reasons I place no statute of limitations on spoilers. 🙂 I am as careful about spoiling The Wizard of Oz or Citizen Kane as I am about a movie in theatres now. People enter pop culture awareness all the time: children growing up, people coming from different cultures, people who have just gotten into reading (as one example).

It’s quite possible that the majority of people in America today first encountered the phrase “Big Brother” meaning a…surveilling authority through the TV show, not through the book. I used to do Shakespeare on stage, and I remember seeing something that suggested more people watch a single episode of the most popular sitcom of the day than have seen all of Shakespeare’s plays live on stage…combined through history.

If a creator chooses to use a phrase from a book as a title, I don’t think they generally intend to usurp the popular association. I think they tend to use it ironically, or to have their readers and potential readers be informed by the allusion.

I named my own book of quotations

The Mind Boggles: A Unique Book of Quotations (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

after a quotation from a movie (The Thing). I didn’t think most people would make the connection right away, but that some people would.

Given that this is the case, that much of an audience may encounter the quotation before the source, I thought it would be fun to do a little quiz. 🙂

In each of these cases, I knew the original source before it was used as a title for another work. For that reason, I think I assumed that other readers did, too…but that was certainly presumptuous on my part.

I’ll give you ten titles (and I’ve decided to include band names) taken from books (that could include things like fairy tales, possibly…written word works might be the best description. They won’t have originated in visual media, like TV and movies). See how many of the original sources you know! Feel free to make your guesses in comments to this post if you’d like others to see it. No fair looking it up before you do so, though: let others try to guess using just their own minds. 😉

Tell you what I’ll do: if you make a comment guessing at at least one of these, and we’ll have to use the honor system that you didn’t research them, I’ll put you in a pool to get a free e-book gift of The Mind Boggles (if you tell me you might want one in the post…be aware that I’ll need to send it to the e-mail address listed privately when you post. My readers don’t see your e-mail address, but I do). I’m going to figure right now on gifting up to five copies, but might flex that depending on how many “players” there are. Note also that you’d have to be in a place where you can get a gift from the USA through Amazon.com.

I’m not going to base it on how many you get right, because again, it would be easy to look them up. If I get more than five qualifying requests, I’ll randomize (unless I decide to give more).

Your comment must be made before I publish the answers…probably in a few days.

Okay, here we go!

  1. Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
  2. Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger
  3. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  4. Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein
  5. The Dogs of War by Frederick Forsyth
  6. The Doors (the name of the band…and the origin of the name of the book on which the band name was based)
  7. The band Steppenwolf
  8. The band Veruca Salt
  9. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
  10. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

How many of these do you know? Ready, set, and then let’s go! 😉

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

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15 Responses to “Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz”

  1. alanchurch Says:

    Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
    Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger
    Tyger,Tyger, Blake
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley-shakespeare?
    Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein-bible
    The Dogs of War by Frederick Forsyth-cry havoc and let loose the dogs of war and
    The Doors (the name of the band…and the origin of the name of the book on which the band name was based) -The Doors of Perception? Huxley
    The band Steppenwolf-herman hesse
    The band Veruca Salt
    As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
    For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway-no man is an island

  2. alanchurch Says:

    already have the book

  3. Lady Galaxy Says:

    Frustrating that you can’t post a reply without seeing those replies already made. It would have been nice if you’d held back the replies until more people had a chance to weigh in. Oh well!

    I wasn’t sure if you wanted author or name of literary work or both. I already have a copy of The Mind Bogles.

    1. The evil sisters in Shakespeare’s Macbeth
    2. Tyger Tyger, (Alternate spelling, Tiger, Tiger) William Blake, Songs of Experience
    3. Shakespeare, The Tempest
    4. The Bible , I think Old Testament but not sure
    5. Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
    6. I have no clue
    7. I know it’s a book title, but can’t remember the author’s name.
    8. Dangling just out of reach of memory!
    9. I should remember his from American lit, but I’m old and I forget stuff;)
    10. A poem by John Donne, can’t remember the title.

    • Lady Galaxy Says:

      Yikes. I didn’t mean for that first paragraph sound so critical. I really liked this topic, but from the way I started out my comment you’d never know it. I’m sorry for my sound and fury. It really signifies nothing!

    • Allie D. Says:

      @Lady Galaxy, I understand your frustration about seeing the replies! But I’ll chime in on Number 8 – Veruca Salt is a character in Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. One of the Golden Ticket winners.

      • Bufo Calvin Says:

        Thanks for writing, Allie!

        I’ll make an adjustment on the replies next time…and I’ll tell you if you are right 😉 soon when I post the answers.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Lady!

      An excellent point about the comments! If I don’t post them, people are sometimes unsure if they actually “went through” or not. Next time I do a guessing this like this, though, I think I’ll reply so they know I have it, but hold up actually posting it for a bit.

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, Lady!

      An excellent point about the comments! If I don’t post them, people are sometimes unsure if they actually “went through” or not. Next time I do a guessing this like this, though, I think I’ll reply so they know I have it, but hold up actually posting it for a bit.

  4. Edward Boyhan Says:

    I don’t usually do well at these kinds of things, but as you mentioned bands, I immediately flashed on to “duran Duran” which I knew came from the movie “Barbarella” which in turn came from a French comic strip. As I read on alas you were mentioning books and plays — so my thoughts of “Duran Duran” faded, and of course “Duran Duran” was not on your list 😦

    Imagine my surprise, when I knew the very first item on your list. Full disclosure: I had been reading an English cozy mystery about a week and a half ago, where “Something wicked this way comes” came up in some dialog. I knew the Bradbury reference, and had read the book, but since the story I was reading was set in pre-WW1 Edwardian England, so it couldn’t be that. Intrigued, I was off to Google where to my surprise it was from a scene I know well. In high school I had a bit part in “Macbeth”, and one of my very good friends was one of the witches (another was Lady M). The line is from the witches scene at the beginning of “Macbeth” — “Double bubble toil and trouble …” (:grin).

    At first blush none of the others triggered anything, but my subconscious got to work, and “The Dogs of War” popped into my head as “Let slip the dogs of war” — also from Shakespeare, but which play? Further mental meanderings and the line becomes “Cry Havoc, and let slip the dogs of war”. Now I have a memory of standing on stage behind someone with sword raised, declaiming, “Cry Havoc .. “. Now I have only had parts in two Shakespeare plays — both more than 55 years ago in High School. One was the afore-mentioned “Macbeth”; the other was “Julius Caesar”. Both have battles towards their ends. In Macbeth when Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinane; and in Julius Caesar when armies under Marc Anthony and Brutus square off after the assassination of JC. Nothing else come to mind to help me decide save that (weakly) I can’t imagine you using the same play twice in your list — so “Julius Caesar”: final answer (:grin)

    For the rest I haven’t a clue save that “For whom the bell tolls” makes me (Swiss cheesely) think the full line is something like “Ask not for whom the bell tolls … something something it tolls for me (or thee??)

    Anyhow, now I’ll post this and run off to Google to see about tolling bells (:grin)

  5. jmyers8888 Says:

    By the pricking of my thumbs, there’s a lot of Shakespeare here. Hope I get Donne before the bell tolls for me. 🙂

    • Bufo Calvin Says:

      Thanks for writing, jmyers8888!

      I could probably have done a whole list of Shakespeare…or is that “Donne”? 😉 Love your comment!

  6. Answers to the titles/band names which came from books quiz | I Love My Kindle Says:

    […] Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz […]

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