Archive for January, 2019

Happy bookish birthdays (January 21) to…

January 21, 2019

Happy bookish birthdays (January 21) to…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog

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A Trip to The Bookstore

January 21, 2019

A Trip to The Bookstore

Note: this is a re-post of an article which originally appeared in this blog on 2011/02/20. I am scheduled for major surgery on January 17th, and I don’t know how quickly I’ll be able to write after that. So, to keep the content going, I am pre-scheduling posts. It’s possible conditions have changed since I wrote it, but I’ll try to lightly edit these when that’s necessary for clarity. 

Grandpa: Okay, kids, here we are…The Bookstore.

Watson (a six-year old boy): Yay!  We’re at the bookstore!  What’s a bookstore, Grandpa?

StefJo (a nine-year old girl): It’s a site where they sell books, BeeSOD.

Grandpa: We don’t call them sites when we are there in person, StefJo…we call them stores.  And don’t call your brother names.

StefJo: Yes, Grandpa.

Salesclerk: Hi, can I help you folks find something?

(Watson starts crying and hides behind Grandpa)

StefJo (whispering): Grandpa, why is that man talking to us?  We don’t know him.

Grandpa (whispering): It’s okay, StefJo…he works for the store.  You just say, “No thank you, we’re just looking.”

StefJo: No thank you, we’re just looking.

Salesclerk: Well, if you folks want anything, just let me know.  (leaves)

StefJo: I don’t understand, Grandpa.  Why would a stranger talk to us like that?

Grandpa: Well, the store would pay them to do that.  That way, he can help us find some books to buy.

StefJo: Why can’t we find them ourselves?

Grandpa: We can…but this is a big place, we might need help.

StefJo: Can’t we just do a search?

Grandpa: There might be a computer around here some place–

Watson: I have a phone!

Grandpa: I know you do, Byte-Byte.  That won’t help us here, though.  Your phone won’t know which books are where.

StefJo: What do you mean?  Don’t they bring us the books?

Grandpa: No, we walk around the store and look.  See those signs?  They tell us what kind of books are where.  We just need to find the Children’s section.

Watson: Carry me!

Grandpa: Hop up here, Sport.  I think I see the children’s books over there.

(Grandpa carries Watson over to the children’s books section.  StefJo walks up to a shelf of Young Adult books.)

StefJo: Look, Grandpa, they have Nancy Drew!  (She touches the picture on the spine of the book.  She rubs her fingers up and down the spine.)  Grandpa, I can’t get it to open.

Grandpa: You have to take it off the shelf first.  Just get one finger on the top, like this, and you can tilt it towards you and pull it off.  Okay, there’s a comfortable chair…why don’t you sit there and read?  I’m going to help your brother find a book.

StefJo: Sure, Grandpa.

(Grandpa takes Watson to an area with picture books.  He pulls out a copy of Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, and starts Watson looking at the book)

StefJo: Grandpa!

Grandpa: What is it, Princess?

StefJo: I got the book open, but it isn’t in English.  How do I change it?

Grandpa: It’s not?  Oh, I see, you have the book upside down.

StefJo: Oh.

Grandpa: Were you reading this book before we came here?

StefJo: No, why?

Grandpa: Well, you’re in the middle of the book.

StefJo: I didn’t know how to make it go to the beginning.

Grandpa: You just start over here on this side.  Then, as you finish reading a page, you turn to the next one…like this.

StefJo: Thanks, Grandpa.  Are these numbers the percentages?  This is short!

Grandpa: No, those are page numbers.  See?  Every time you turn the page, the number gets higher.

StefJo: But I tried and the number was like ten higher!

Grandpa: You must have turned too many pages.  You have to be careful just to get one of them.

StefJo: That’s hard!

Grandpa: You’ll get used to it.

StefJo: Oops!  The page has a big line on it!

Grandpa: Let me see that…oh, it looks like you tore the page!

StefJo: I’m sorry, Grandpa.

Grandpa: Oh, that’s okay, that happens.  We’ll just have to buy this one.  We can tape it up when we get home.

StefJo: What’s tape?

Grandpa: I think they sell it here.  You use it to stick two pieces of paper together.

StefJo: What’s paper?

Grandpa: That’s what the pages are made of.  If we tape it together, it won’t tear any more.

StefJo: Why don’t they just make the whole book out of tape, then?

Grandpa: That’s a good question, Stef.  Let’s go see how your brother is doing.  Hey, Byte-Byte…where is the book?

Watson: I deleted it.

Grandpa: You deleted…what do you mean?

Watson: I got done, so I threw it away.

Grandpa: Why did you do that?  Why didn’t you put it back on the shelf?

Watson: I didn’t like it.  It didn’t sing to me like at home.

Grandpa: Where did you throw it away?

Watson (starting to cry again): Over there!

(Grandpa fishes the book out of a garbage can)

Grandpa: Well, we’re lucky they have old-fashioned garbage cans here, too, and not recyclatrons.  We’ll just have to buy this one, too.

Watson: I don’t want it!  I don’t want it! (crying and screaming)

Grandpa: Watson!  Calm down!

StefJo: Couldn’t we just put it back on the shelf?  It looks okay.

Grandpa: Yes, you’re right.  It’s okay, Sport, it’s okay!  You don’t have to have the book.

StefJo: Grandpa, look out!  It’s that man again!  We’re just looking, we’re just looking!

Salesclerk: Everything okay here, folks?

Grandpa: Yes, yes.  I’m afraid there was a little misunderstanding, and my grandson here threw this book in the garbage.  I’d be happy to pay for it…

Salesclerk: Don’t worry about it…happens all the time.  I’ve seen kids do a lot worse things to books.  We’ll just put it back right here, and someone else can buy it.

StefJo (whispering): Are all the books dirty like that?

Grandpa (whispering): It’s not dirty, but you never know what someone else has done with a book you buy.

StefJo: Ew!

Grandpa: Unfortunately, we did damage this one…I insist on buying it.

Salesclerk: That’s fine, then.  Come right over here to the check-out.  That one is one hundred dollars.

Grandpa: That’s more than what we paid for our admission tickets to this place.

StefJo: I’m sorry, Grandpa.

Grandpa: Oh, that’s okay, Princess.  It’s fun for Grandpa to buy a book like in the old days.

StefJo: Will you carry it for me?  It’s heavy.

Grandpa: Sure, Princess.

StefJO: Where are we going next?

Grandpa: To The Pet Store.  I understand they have some real live dogs and cats.

StefJo: You mean alive alive?

Grandpa: I think so.

StefJo: That’s scary!  I don’t think Watson would like that.

Grandpa: Yes, you’re a smart girl.  I can see how that might scare him.  You are much braver, aren’t you?

(StefJo gives a shy smile)

Grandpa: Where would you like to go, Sport?

Watson: I wanna eat.

Grandpa: We can go to The Food Court.  They have some amazing things there!

StefJo: Do they have broccoli?  I like broccoli.

Grandpa: Wouldn’t you like to try something from when your parents were kids?  I’ll bet they’ll have a Happy Meal!  Doesn’t that sound good?

StefJo: I guess so.  People aren’t going to talk to us there, right?

Grandpa: Well, there is usually somebody behind the counter who takes our orders.  But they won’t come to the table.

Watson (looking confused): What’s a table?

Grandpa: I’ll show you when we get there.  It’s a place where we all sit down together and talk to each other.

StefJo: The olden days sure were hard, Grandpa.

Grandpa: I guess they were in some ways, Princess.  But you know what was always the same?

StefJo: What’s that?

Grandpa: There were always grandpas who loved their grandkids very much.

Watson: I love you, Grandpa!

Grandpa: I love you too, Sport!  Let’s go get some fries…and later on, I’ll show you a car!

(The three of them start to leave The Bookstore together, Grandpa holding StefJo’s hand, StefJo holding Watson’s hand.  In Grandpa’s other hand is a bag, and in it is a book.)

Grandpa: You kids wait here for a minute…play with your phones.

(Grandpa walks over to the salesclerk who is dusting off some books)

Grandpa: Sir?  Would you mind very much if I gave you this back?

Salesclerk: I’m afraid I can’t give you a refund…you said it was damaged.

Grandpa: I don’t want a refund.  You can just put it back on the shelf.  I was thinking about it…I don’t think their parents are going to want me to bring it home: they wouldn’t have any place to put it.  I think it belongs here, where other kids can see it.

Salesclerk: But what about your granddaughter?  Didn’t you buy it for her?

Grandpa: Don’t worry about it…she won’t even miss it.

Salesclerk: As you wish, sir.  Thank you for shopping with The Bookstore.  We’ll look forward to seeing you again.

Grandpa: Maybe when the kids are older…I think they’ll appreciate the history of it more.  Think you’ll still be around in five years?

Salesclerk: Why certainly, sir.  We’ve been doing business the same way for over one hundred years.  Now that we are entirely government supported, there’s no reason we can’t keep doing it for the next hundred.

Grandpa: See you in five years, then.

(Grandpa walks back towards the kids, but stops a meter away.  Neither child looks up.  They haven’t noticed him yet.  Watson is shaking his phone wildly with his eyes closed, playing some kind of game with tactile feedback or a machine-brain interface.  StefJo sits quietly, reading as the pages turn automatically for her.  Grandpa remembers back to lying under a blanket reading with a flashlight, or sitting under a tree with a book.  He recognizes that look on her face…she’s wherever the book has taken her…Mars, Oz, Fairlyland…or a time long ago when people did things in strange ways.  He knows that look, and he smiles.  Some things never change.)


[2019 note: this has been the only one of my works to date where I authorized a translated version (to Portuguese…that was thrilling! There may be others out there that are infringing, of course, and in the future, simple translations may be handled effectively by artificial intelligence…but I do think it will be some time before that will be anywhere near what a really skilled human translator can do.]

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

 This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

If e-books were first…

January 20, 2019

If e-books were first…

Note: this is a re-post of an article which originally appeared in this blog on 2009/09/25. I am scheduled for major surgery on January 17th, and I don’t know how quickly I’ll be able to write after that. So, to keep the content going, I am pre-scheduling posts. It’s possible conditions have changed since I wrote it, but I’ll try to lightly edit these when that’s necessary for clarity. 

Eric: “Hey, Paul, what’s that?”
Paul: “It’s the latest thing. It’s a paper book.”
Eric: (showing his Kindle to Paul and imitating Crocodile Dundee) “That’s not a book. This is a book.”
Paul: “Ess-atch-atch-atch. Very funny.”
Eric: “So, what do you have on there?”
Paul: “I’m reading The Stand.”
Eric: “What else?”
Paul: “That’s it.  It’s just the one book.”
Eric: “Is it frozen? Did you call Customer Service?”
Paul: “No, it’s supposed to be like that.”
Eric: “What happens when you want to read something else?”
Paul: “You buy another one.”
Eric: “What a rip-off!  What did it cost?”
Paul: “Twenty-four dollars.”
Eric: “Twenty-four dollars?! I’ve never paid that much for a book! Why does it cost so much?’
Paul: “Well, it’s made out of paper.”
Eric: “What’s paper?”
Paul: “I don’t know exactly.  It comes from trees.”
Eric: “Trees? Like, it’s a leaf or something?”
Paul: “I don’t think so.  I think they mash the trees up or something.”
Eric: “Gross.  Is it sticky?”
Paul: “No, not really.”
Eric: “Where do they get the trees?”
Paul: “I don’t know.”
Eric: “Let me see it.  Whoa, this thing is frickin’ heavy!  How do you hold it?”
Paul: “You get used to it. They sell stands and stuff for them.”
Eric: “Where are you going to keep it?”
Paul: “Well, I don’t really know. They sell shelves for them.”
Eric: “You’re not putting those things in the apartment!  It’s bad enough I’ve got to live with my brother, but you’re taking up enough room with those…what do you call them, BVDs?”
Paul: “Those are antiques.”
Eric: “Yeah, whatever.  So, I’ve always wanted to read this.  Make it bigger.”
Paul: “You can’t.”
Eric: “What do you mean, you can’t? Just push the button.”
Paul: “No buttons.  That’s what size the letters are.”
Eric: “That’s discriminatory! How am I supposed to read those little things?”
Paul: “They sell ones with bigger text. I saw this one for thirty-five bucks.”
Eric: “Well, that’s sold me…”
Paul: “They’re expensive. They don’t need that many people to buy them.”
Eric: “Definitely a niche product.  It still doesn’t seem fair.  I’ll tell you what: shoot me a copy and I’ll read it on my Kindle.”
Paul: “I can’t do that.  I’m not allowed to send it to anybody.”
Eric: “But we’re on the same account!”
Paul: “That doesn’t matter.  I only get one license.  I can sell this one to somebody else, though.”
Eric: “Good luck with that.”
Paul: “Ha, ha.  Hey, you got mustard on the page!”
Eric: “So what? Hit Alt+G.”
Paul: “I can’t, man. You messed it up permanently.”
Eric: “Call Customer Service.  Maybe they’ll send you another one or reset it or something.”
Paul: “Can’t. Once I buy it, they don’t service it.”
Eric: “This is never going to catch on.”
Paul: “I know.  I just love gadgets…”

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

A version of this post originally appeared in the Amazon Kindle forum on April 17, 2009 here.  It subsequently appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

Happy bookish birthdays (January 20) to…

January 20, 2019

Happy bookish birthdays (January 20) to…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog

Happy bookish birthdays (January 19) to…

January 19, 2019

Happy bookish birthdays (January 19) to…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog

The art and the artist

January 19, 2019

The art and the artist

Note: this is a re-post of an article which originally appeared in this blog on 2011/03/26. I am scheduled for major surgery on January 17th, and I don’t know how quickly I’ll be able to write after that. So, to keep the content going, I am pre-scheduling posts. It’s possible conditions have changed since I wrote it, but I’ll try to lightly edit these when that’s necessary for clarity. 

I recently reviewed a book, and talked specifically about how the way the book treated certain different groups of people bothered me.

However, I also talked about the good writing in the book.

A reader reasonably called me on that, and it brings up what to me is one of the classic questions.

I’ve written before about the problem of changing standards over time…about how something that is very offensive now may not have been as offensive when it was first published:

The Chronological Cultural Context Conundrum

This is a bit of a different question though, and I thought it was worthy of a separate post.

Suppose that you knew an author (or other artist) held an attitude that you found abhorrent?  Could you judge the writing fairly?  Should you?

What if an author wrote a really racist book…and other books that weren’t.  Should all of the books be ignored (or even censored)?

It’s a complicated question for me.  I honestly want to judge the art separately from the artist.

I think, for example, that Frank Sinatra was one of the great singers…his phraseology, his emotional content, was incredible.

However, I also know that he is at least alleged to have done things I find morally difficult.

Tarzan has been removed from some schools for being racist.  No question, Jane’s nurse in the first book is certainly a stereotype.  Tarzan refers to Tarmangani (people of European descent) and Gomangani (people  of African descent) as two different types.  It’s also been suggested that just the fact that Tarzan is a European who dominates the indigenous population is a racist stereotype.  However, Tarzan does have people of African descent as friends.

Even with the latter element, let’s say Tarzan is racist.  Does that mean no one should read any Edgar Rice Burroughs?  Should one not commend the excitement in the other series?

Let’s say you knew an author was a murderer…would that make you skip the book?

I can see taking that position.  This is a case where it would make a difference for me as to whether the book was under copyright or not.  I might not buy a book from an author who behaves in a way I find unacceptable, because I don’t want them to get the money.  For an odd reason, I didn’t watch the movies of a really famous actor while the actor was alive.

My Significant Other and I have stopped shopping at certain stores, because we disagreed with their policies.  I don’t buy books from companies that block text-to-speech access, because I don’t want to give them money. [2019 Update: I don’t eliminate an entire publisher, just books on which text-to-speech has been intentionally blocked…I decided that might encourage that publisher to stop blocking, since it gives them an internal sales comparison. Blocking TTS seems to have largely stopped]

However…

I still think the books from those publishers can be quality works of art.

I’m sorry if I offended anyone by both praising someone’s writing and talking about prejudicial portrayals in that author’s works in the same post.   My goal in doing that is to give you what I liked and didn’t like about the book, and to give you enough information so you can make the decision for yourself.

Should I simply not write about people who either write offensive works or who had…difficult personal lives?

I have to tell you, I’m not sure what books that would leave.  I think it might be hard to find an author never wrote about violence, had characters engage in chauvinistic behavior (or portrayed women as inferior), or who never used racial/ethnic/religious/sexual preference stereotypes.  An ethnicity might be called stubborn, or lazy, or unimaginative, or superstitious, or a host of other negatives.

My feeling is still that it’s best to alert you to what I find offensive, and then let you decide.

What do you think?  Can you separate the art and the artist?  Should you?  If an author has written offensively once, does that taint everything that author writes?  Does it matter how the stereotype is portrayed?  Should art be judged on its own merit, or should a work be rejected based on the author’s life?  I’m really interested to hear what you think about this one!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

As a writer who is also on social media, this gadget is my best new tool in years!

January 18, 2019

As a writer who is also on social media, this gadget is my best new tool in years!

After the holidays, I had $50 to spend at Amazon.

I already knew I wanted a Bluetooth (wireless) keyboard to use with my phone. I’m going to be recovering from hip replacement surgery, and using my laptop would just not be as convenient.

I decided to go with the

iClever folding keyboard (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

iClever is a brand I’ve really liked…they don’t feel like the most luxurious or top of the line, but their user interface design has been terrific (very easy to use), and they work as advertised. I got an iClever waterproof speaker that I use in the bathroom and connect to an

Echo Dot (at AmazonSmile*)

(mine is a 2nd gen…this is a link to a 3rd gen), mostly for listening to the news (my “Flash Briefing”) while I get ready.

It’s been very reliable.

Well, this keyboard far exceeded my expectations as a writer!

I type pretty quickly: last time I was tested (many years ago…likely not true now), I typed in the 90s (words per minute…wpm). That’s not super-fast, but it’s fast. I’m picky about my keyboards; sometimes they aren’t responsive enough to pick up my light typing style (many speedy typists use less pressure on the keys than slower ones).

The “feel” of this keyboard is excellent…I’d say equivalent to my laptop’s keyboard. It folds up to a secure slim metal enclosed device…I feel safe putting it in my pocket with my Fire tablet (I have big pockets on the weekends).

Here’s a picture of it next to a teaspoon, to give you a sense of the size. It’s about as thick as a finger.

aluminum-cased keyboard with black closure, folded like a book, next to a teaspoon (they are approximately the same length) on a wooden background

iclever IC-BK05 next to a teaspoon

I said I’m a good typist…I’m not a good thumb texter. I’ve just never gotten the hang of that. I mostly dictate my texts…or, I did before this. Speaking out loud is not always convenient, and at this point, I’m more accurate typing than speech-to-text is. I have already paired it to my Galaxy S8, so when I unfold it, it is ready to type within a second or so.

I certainly pull it out just to type a short text, now, or even to enter a search for Google or a GIF.

I can also type longer things…and do. If I thought I’d have to do some serious writing during lunch at work, I used to bring my personal laptop (in addition to my work laptop). That’s no longer necessary…I can type effectively on my iClever.

I also, love, love, love that it has keyboard shortcuts! I can use CTRL+C to copy and CTRL+V to paste, for example. Long-pressing to perform those operations, as I’d have to with just my phone, can be difficult to get to work properly.

Another giant one? Alt+Tab! Windows users are hopefully familiar with that: it’s how you switch between open programs on a Windows computer. So much easier to do that than to tap a teensy icon to open up a “deck” of my programs, swipe to the correct one, and then tap. It’s Alt+TAB, TAB, TAB (until I get to the one I want) then just release.

Is it perfect?

No. 🙂

I may just have not found the setting yet, but it always opens up with the backlight on (there are three colors of backlighting for the keys). I can turn it off easily, but it takes a lot more battery charge and I’ll rarely use it.

One key has seemed a little loose, but it always settles quickly…no big deal.

The other thing is that I’d like a way to lock it into the flat position. It holds that shape reasonably well…I’ve used it many times on a pillow on my lap. Still, having it be rigid (maybe with a swinging arm across the back) would be nice.

If you are a writer, or just someone who wants to write things on a phone or tablet a lot (and aren’t an expert thumb typists), I highly recommend it!

One more note: there is an older version without the backlight, which is about $10 cheaper…

iClever Bluetooth keyboard without backlight (at AmazonSmile*)

Assuming everything else is about the same, that might be better for most people. It’s a 90 hour battery charge life…while using it. My version is 300 hours…but only 5 hours when using the backlight. I haven’t tested the less expensive one, though. I can see times when the backlight might be useful, even though I see really well in the dark (I think that’s tied to my color vision deficiency). On an airplane, for example, you might be able to avoid using the overhead light…but your phone/tablet would obviously be lit up anyway.

I’ve been showing it off: might become a “prize” at some point at work, when we do those sorts of things. I was amused when someone described a keyboard to me as “quaint”, and I get that. I sometimes lightheartedly kid people when they say, “Do you have a pen?” I’ll say, “No, but I have a keyboard: would you like to borrow that?” 🙂 I feel like saying, “Gosh, I think I left my pen in my saddlebags…my horse is hitched outside,” but that wouldn’t be very friendly… 😉

I also hope to use it in VR…I plan to test that soon. Using it in VR would be even easier than looking at my phone during recovery.

What do you think? What’s been the best writing tool you’ve found? Have you used iClever…if so, what do you think? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Note: I am writing this ahead because I am scheduled for that surgery on January 17th…and I don’t know how capable of cogent writing I’ll be for a while afterwards. In this case, that might mean I don’t respond to your comments very quickly.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

 

Happy bookish birthdays (January 18) to…

January 18, 2019

Happy bookish birthdays (January 18) to…

“Rabbit’s clever,” said Pooh thoughtfully.
“Yes,” said Piglet, “Rabbit’s clever.”
“And he has Brain.”
“Yes,” said Piglet, “Rabbit has Brain.”
There was a long silence.
“I suppose,” said Pooh, “that that’s why he never understands anything.”
–A.A. Milne (born January 18), writing in The House at Pooh Corner
collected in The Mind Boggles: A Unique Book of Quotations (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) by Bufo Calvin

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog

I am out of surgery

January 17, 2019

FYI…I am out of surgery, so far so good. 🙂

Happy bookish birthdays (January 17) to…

January 17, 2019

Happy bookish birthdays (January 17) to…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog


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