Archive for the ‘Globalization’ Category

Random country #1: Dominican Republic

May 17, 2016

Random country #1: Dominican Republic

I’m always looking for new ways to discover things to read. It really concerns me that I might get set into certain patterns, and miss something which might change my thinking just out of habit.

I’ve done it different ways, but today,聽I thought I’d pick a random country and see what was in the USA Kindle store for it. Sure, I want to expand my horizons, but I want the convenience of buying from the Kindle store…and doing something I think is illegal or immoral (for me) is not where I’m going to go.

In terms of methodology, I figured I’d go with United Nations member states. That doesn’t cover every country, but does cover quite a few. So, I started with the

United Nations list of member states

from their site.

Next, I used our

Amazon Echo (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

to give me a random number between one and twenty-six (to get a letter), and then had it give me a random number for the number of countries that started with that letter. That was just a simple way to do it.

The letter was “D” and the number was “6”…which is the聽Dominican Republic.

The Dominican Republic joined the UN on October 24, 1945…which means it joined in the first year (but wasn’t one of the very first).

For an overview, here is

The Dominican Republic at Wikipedia

Briefly, it is on the same island as Haiti, and has one of the more robust economies in the area.

I’ll admit, I couldn’t name authors from the Dominican Republic聽right offhand…which fit right in with the idea of checking “random countries”!

I checked a couple of sites outside of Amazon first:

The Latino Author

Dominican Republic Literature at Wikipedia

The latter, not surprisingly, had a much bigger list…including at least one well-known name in the USA, Junot Diaz. It also had links to other online sites.

Next, I wanted to see what Amazon had. That’s part of the point of this for me, to see what shoppers at Amazon would find who were interested in the given country’s literature.

Search for “Dominican Republic” in the USA Kindle store (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

I got 343 results, with 80 available through

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

at no additional cost for members of Amazon’s subser (subscription service). I’ve been a happy KU member since they started, so I do always check that. In fact, I basically read e-books I already own (our adult kid just gave me a bunch of science fiction pulp anthologies) or books from KU. I put other books on my wish list for my family.馃檪

Here is the distribution among categories:

Note that the same book may appear in multiple categories (I think up to three).

Hm..nothing is listed as literature, although clearly, many of the books in “Kindle eBooks” are likely to be fiction.

Oh, that’s better! When I clicked “Kindle eBooks” and then expanded, I got more valuable categories:

Checking literature, I found something that very much fit what I would want to read…if it was in KU:

In the Time of the Butterflies (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)
by Julia Alvarez
4.4 stars out of 5 (459 customer reviews)

Alvarez is a native of the Dominican Republic, and wrote How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents.

It’s based on real events in history, when “Las Mariposas” (The Butterflies”) who, as siblings, opposed the dictatorial leader Trujillo.

That’s exactly the kind of cultural thing I would think would give me insight into a country’s thoughts and feelings…like an expert American writer fictionalizing Billy the Kid, or an Australian writing about Ned Kelly.

There were six KU聽 books listed as history for the Dominican Republic, and I would probably read this one if I was going to go visit:

History and Culture of Dominican Republic, Government, Politics Economy, Tourism: Migration, The First Colony
by Uzo Marvin

I’d also look for a humor book, a children’s book, and a science fiction/fantasy book.馃檪 Being me, I’d look for a book on the animals of the country as well.

I suspect I may have some readers with knowledge of the literature of The Dominican Republic, though, so before I keep digging, I thought I’d ask…any recommendations? I’d prefer KU,聽 of course, but regardless, I’m curious.馃檪 Feel free to make them (or add other thoughts) by commenting on this post.

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard聽our new聽The Measured Circle鈥檚 Geek Time聽Trip聽at The History Project!

*When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

 

Kindle Spanish Monthly Deals

March 25, 2016

Kindle Spanish Monthly Deals

I’m happy to see Amazon continuing to expand its support聽for more languages…and not just because our adult kid is a linguist.馃槈

More languages often means more diversity of opinion. Even when a book is translated from one language to another (as Amazon does into English with its AmazonCrossing imprint), idiom can change.

When I was in high school, I took more than three years of Russian, because I wanted to be able to read certain things (especially non-fiction) in the original language. I never really got fluent, though. I did much better with Spanish, which I can still read to some extent, at least simple things.

So, I was excited to see the addition of

Kindle Spanish Monthly Deals聽(at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Interestingly, the

Kindle Monthly Deals

usually say up to 80% off, and these said up to 50% off. There were also 57 books in the Spanish deal, and 339 in the English deal, but it’s聽still something. 21 of them were in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

a much higher percentage than the English list.

That’s great if you want to learn Spanish! I used to read comic books and the Yellow Pages (remember those?) in Spanish when I was learning it…I think that helped a lot.

It looked to me like these were mostly translations: there was a special selection of Haruki Murakami, and Isaac Asimov’s “Yo, Robot” was also featured.

There were also a lot more categories in the聽 Spanish store! Many of them focused on KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing) books, and there is a big promotion for the Mes de autopublicaci贸n: (month of self-publishing, I think).

It also seems like once a sale has been created, it sticks around.馃檪

Here’s that list of categories:

eBooks Kindle en Espa帽ol
  • Novedades (25)
  • Especial Vargas Llosa (11)
  • Romances de invierno (200)
  • Novedades Exclusivas (27)
  • Cada d铆a un bestseller (116)
  • San Valent铆n (85)
  • Selecci贸n Kindle 2015 (10)
  • Breve Historia al 50% (107)
  • Los mejores Kindle Flash del a帽o (12)
  • Kindle Flash especial Reyes (11)
  • El铆sabet Benavent (10)
  • Libros 煤nicos (27)
  • Julia Navarro con hasta -20% (11)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: eBooks a $0.99 (5,878)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: eBooks con hasta un -75% (3,575)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Salud, familia y desarrollo personal (499)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Ciencia Ficci贸n y Fantas铆a (510)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Negocios e Inversi贸n (640)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Literatura y Ficci贸n (1,332)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Infantil y Juvenil (442)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Autoayuda (650)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Religi贸n (748)
  • Finalistas del 2.掳 Concurso Literario de Autores Indies (5)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: eBooks (9,453)
  • Ismael Cala (5)
  • Stephen King (11)
  • Mafalda (11)
  • Participantes 2.潞 Concurso Literario de Autores Indies 2015 (948)
  • Kindle Direct Publishing (22)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Misterio y Thriller (232)
  • Matilde Asensi (11)
  • Black Rock (6)
  • Lecturas de agosto (47)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Er贸tica (278)
  • Promoci贸n Libros Kindle (5)
  • Ficci贸n Concurso KDP (158)
  • Polic铆aca, negra y suspenso Concurso KDP (36)
  • Ciencia ficci贸n y Fantas铆a Concurso KDP (57)
  • Autoayuda Concurso KDP (23)
  • Romance Concurso KDP (22)
  • Romances de verano (96)
  • Lecturas de verano (196)
  • ABC (4)
  • Especial firmas de autor (8)
  • Mes del libro (31)
  • Ciudad de Libros: Mar铆a Pilar Queralt (4)
  • Ciudad de Libros: Joaqu铆n Borrell (7)
  • Ciudad de Libros: Philippa Carr (11)
  • Especial Marzo (36)
  • Especial marzo (22)
  • Ciudad de libros (2)
  • Mafalda en Kindle Unlimited (31)
  • Especial libros de pel铆cula (49)
  • eBooks TEC (77)
  • Especial Mafalda (33)
  • Lo mejor de Kindle Flash (10)
  • Romances de Navidad (97)
  • Fiestas 2014 (36)
  • Selecci贸n Kindle (11)
  • 50 imprescindibles (44)
  • Breve historia de (100)
  • Black Friday 2014 (36)
  • El Buen Fin 2014 (36)
  • Especial octubre 2014 (25)
  • Especial Octubre (361)
  • Rius en la Tienda Kindle (33)
  • Harlequin Verano (92)
  • Algarab铆a eShoppe (62)
  • Especial D铆a del Padre (29)
  • Cinco de Mayo (36)
  • Especial D铆a de la madre (135)
  • Gabriel Garc铆a M谩rquez (17)
  • Backup Node (83)
  • eBooks a mitad de precio – segunda quincena (57)
  • eBooks a mitad de precio – primera quincena (53)
  • Especial en novela rom谩ntica: eBooks desde $0.99 (96)
  • Especial Navidad 2013 (69)
  • Black Friday 2013 (54)
  • Leer-e (350)
  • Lecturas de primavera (116)
  • Gaturro (35)
  • Black Friday Spanish (941)
  • Selecci贸n D铆a de la madre: hasta -60% (39)
  • Novedades-LATAM (863)
  • Novedades-USA (412)
  • Rom谩ntica desde $0.99 (87)
  • Mafalda en Kindle (11)
  • La Naci贸n Shorts (13)
  • Los m谩s vendidos del New York Times (27)
  • Ficci贸n (15,993)
  • No-Ficci贸n (15,033)
  • Autoayuda (2,258)
  • Biograf铆as y memorias (1,122)
  • Ciencia (1,035)
  • Ciencia ficci贸n (549)
  • Cocina (168)
  • C贸mics y novelas gr谩ficas (93)
  • Computaci贸n e internet (229)
  • Deportes (218)
  • Entretenimiento (987)
  • Fantas铆a (438)
  • Historia (1,677)
  • Hogar y jardiner铆a (866)
  • Humor (341)
  • Infantil y juvenil (1,760)
  • Literatura y ficci贸n (3,461)
  • Negocios e inversiones (1,010)
  • Padres y familia (428)
  • Misterio, thriller y suspenso (1,054)
  • Pol铆tica y noticias (441)
  • Referencia (1,508)
  • Religi贸n y espiritualidad (3,030)
  • Romance (2,979)
  • Salud, familia y desarrollo personal (163)
  • Viajes y turismo (257)
  • Colecci贸n Harlequin (4,911)
  • Dora y Diego (12)
  • El Pa铆s Shorts (305)
  • Libros destacados de M茅xico y Latinoamerica (287)
  • Obras Mexicanas (64)
  • Paulo Coelho (3)
  • Peri贸dicos (5)
  • Concurso Indie (972)
  • Mes de autopublicaci贸n: Historia (330)

隆Feliz lectura!

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard聽our new聽The Measured Circle鈥檚 Geek Time聽Trip聽at The History Project!

*聽I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

 

Amazon.com’s Chinese storefront

December 6, 2015

Amazon.com’s Chinese storefront

涔︾睄鏄繖閲

Amazon.com now has a

Chinese storefront (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

It has 16,039 titles at this point.

That may not sound like much (the USA Kindle store started with about 80,000 title back in 2007), but this is a milestone.

Amazon.com has always had sections for different languages, and still does

Foreign Language E-Books (at AmazonSmile*)

It shows these counts:

Foreign Languages
Chinese (18,283)
French (116,602)
German (264,492)
Italian (91,008)
Japanese (46,434)
Portuguese (50,852)
Russian (21,982)
Spanish (154,250)
Other Languages (17,392)

The Other Languages section further breaks down like this:

Show results for
Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited Eligible 鈥奒indle Unlimited Eligible (4,437)
New Releases
Last 30 days (455)
Last 90 days (1,315)
Coming Soon (43)
Kindle Store
Kindle eBooks
Foreign Languages
Other Languages
Afrikaans (3,424)
Alsatian (17)
Basque (397)
Catalan (4,583)
Croatian (1)
Danish (979)
Dutch (3,611)
Galician (472)
Greek (3)
Hindi (60)
Hungarian (1)
Icelandic (447)
Irish (430)
Luxembourgish (9)
Manx (11)
Norwegian (698)
Polish (1)
Proven莽al (4)”>
Scots (45)
Scottish Gaelic (8)
Swahili (103)
Swedish (898)
Welsh (420)

Now, those aren’t all the foreign languages in the store, of course…as I’ve written about before, there are even books in Klingon.馃槈

However, having books in the store, or having a section in the store…those two aren’t the same as having a storefront.

In the Chinese storefront, the interface is largely in Chinese. The book description was in Chinese.

The reviews that I’ve seen so far are in English.

Amazon does have a store in China

http://www.amazon.cn/

and that is different…there are more than 20,000 titles there just in the fiction section.

The difference mostly has to do with licensing, which in turn is based on copyright.

Just because a publisher as the right to sell a book in China doesn’t mean that it has the right to sell that same book in the USA.

It’s not surprising that more publishers would pay for the rights for a book in Chinese in the Chinese market.

This Kindle Store USA storefront recognizes the large number of Chinese readers in the USA, and I think that’s important.

Amazon can both continue to expand to other markets (they just released the Fire tablet 聽in China), and further serve the USA market.

Admittedly, a move like this is a challenge to local Chinese language brick-and-mortar bookstores. They won’t be able to exist just by having books in Chinese, but I don’t think many of them do. Generally, they are destination shops, in some cases with a cultural familiarity, in others, more of a community connection.

This makes the part to thriving for Chinese language bookstores in the USA essentially the same as the path for English language bookstores: make people willing to knowingly spend more money just to support you.

Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

*聽I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Round up #310: Amazon sues over false reviews, membaca lebih banyak buku

October 19, 2015

Round up #310: Amazon sues over false reviews, membaca lebih banyak buku

The ILMK Round ups聽are聽short pieces which may or may not be expanded later.

Follow up to a recent post on translations

I recently wrote

Found in translation
about Amazon’s commitment to their AmazonCrossing imprint, which translates works.

Following that, Amazon sent me this, which does not appear in their normal press release archive:

AmazonCrossing Announces Spotlight on Indonesian Literature

Amazon Publishing commits to publish Indonesian authors beginning in 2016

Spotlight part of $10 million investment to increase publication of international books into English

SEATTLE鈥擮ctober 15, 2015鈥(NASDAQ: AMZN)鈥擜mazonCrossing, the literary translation imprint of Amazon Publishing, today announced a commitment to publish exceptional works of literature from Indonesian authors translated into English beginning in early 2016. The announcement coincides with Indonesia鈥檚 participation as Guest of Honor at the Frankfurt Book Fair this week.

Indonesian titles planned for publication include:

  • Nirzona, a love story by Abidah El Khalieqy, set against the backdrop of the Aceh tsunami, a rare moment in recent history when the world鈥檚 eyes turned to Indonesia
  • English-language originals The Oddfits and The More Known World, the first two titles in the Oddfits series from Indonesia-born Tiffany Tsao, a translator and past Indonesia editor at large forAsymptote Journal
  • Paper Boats, a new adult love story written in glittering, quotable prose from popular novelist, actress, and singer Dee Lestari
  • A new edition of Laksmi Pamuntjak鈥檚 acclaimed A Question of Red and her latest, Aruna and Her Palate, which follows a food writer鈥檚 travels through Indonesia
  • Hummingbird, a stunning work of magical realism from Nukila Amal

鈥淎mazonCrossing is committed to bringing great authors and stories to a global audience, and our spotlight programs have offered an opportunity to focus attention on a range of books from specific countries鈥攕omething we plan to do more of as part of our continued commitment to the translation imprint鈥檚 expansion,鈥 said Sarah Jane Gunter, Publisher of AmazonCrossing and General Manager of International Publishing, referring to previous programs showcasing literature from Iceland, Brazil, and Finland. 鈥淚ndonesia鈥檚 contributions to world literature are not often available to English-language readers and this spotlight reiterates AmazonCrossing鈥檚 commitment to bringing stories into English from languages less frequently seen in translation.鈥

鈥淚 feel like my writing and I are difficult to categorize,鈥 says author Tiffany Tsao. 鈥The Oddfits resists classification in many respects. And as someone affiliated with multiple cultures and places, I don鈥檛 fit easily into ready-made boxes either. I鈥檓 so incredibly happy to be working with a publisher adventurous enough to give oddness a chance.”

The Indonesia spotlight program follows similar AmazonCrossing programs in past years featuring literature from Finland, Iceland and Brazil. The Finnish spotlight program included Katri Lipson鈥檚 European Union Prize for Literature-winning literary thriller The Ice Cream Man, as well as books by Leena Lehtolainen, Jari J盲rvel盲, Marko Hautala, and Risto Isom盲ki. The Brazilian spotlight program launched in 2013 and has included the release of a dozen books of full-length fiction and short stories from Brazilian authors including Luiz Ruffato, Cristov茫o Tezza, Josy Stoque, and Eliane Brum. In 2012, the Iceland spotlight program included ten Icelandic books, three of which鈥The Hitman鈥檚 Guide to Housecleaning by Hallgrimur Helgason, The Flatey Enigma by Viktor Arnar Ingolfsson, and House of Evidence by Viktor Arnar Ingolfsson鈥攂ecame Kindle Top Ten best sellers.

The AmazonCrossing editorial team is accepting submissions in mystery, thriller, women鈥檚 fiction, historical fiction, literary fiction, memoir, science fiction and fantasy categories. Please visit translation.amazon.com/submissions for more information and to propose titles for translation.

Amazon Publishing is a brand used by Amazon Content Services LLC and Amazon Media EU Sarl.

About Amazon Publishing

Amazon Publishing is the publishing arm of Amazon.com. The Amazon Publishing family has 14 imprints: 47North, AmazonCrossing, AmazonEncore, Amazon Publishing, Grand Harbor Press, Jet City Comics, Lake Union, Little A, Montlake Romance, Skyscape, StoryFront, Thomas & Mercer, Two Lions, and Waterfall Press.

About Amazon
Amazon.com opened on the World Wide Web in July 1995. The company is guided by four principles: customer obsession rather than competitor focus, passion for invention, commitment to operational excellence, and long-term thinking. Customer reviews, 1-Click shopping, personalized recommendations, Prime, Fulfillment by Amazon, AWS, Kindle Direct Publishing, Kindle, Fire tablets, Fire TV, Amazon Echo, and Alexa are some of the products and services pioneered by Amazon.

_____________________

Amazon also聽did this press release (which is in the public archive):

Amazon Announces Winner of the Second Indie Literary Contest for Spanish-Language

The winner was聽Myriam Mill谩n, with her title

La Hija del Drag贸n: Ganadora del Concurso de autores indie 2015 (Spanish Edition) (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

It’s available for $0.99, and at no additional cost for members of

Kindle Unlimited聽(at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

I’ve been a happy member since it started.馃檪 It’s been worth the $9.99 a month for my family.

I’m very happy to see Amazon not only working on globalization, but also embracing multiple languages.

Amazon sues over 1,000 fake reviewers

In a way, this is another follow up.

I recently wrote

The Sunday Times investigation shows bought reviews on聽Amazon

Well, now it turns out Amazon is suing 1,114 fake reviewers, according to this

Forbes article by Cheryl Connor

and other sources.
.
As explained in this

Seattle Times article by Jay Greene

this is Amazon’s second suit this year over false reviews.

Lawsuits are probably the right tool here. As I wrote before, it’s not clear that writing a false review for money is a criminal act, but a lawsuit could work, since Amazon could show damage. I’m not a lawyer, but that’s my understanding of it.

New Amazon Echo/Alexa round up

I alert my ILMK readers when I write new articles in another blog of mine, The Measured Circle, about the Amazon Echo and Amazon’s Alexa voice services.

This is my latest:

Alexa/Echo Round up #3: sports update, Alexa enabled phone calls on first 3rd party Alexa-enabled聽device

What do you think? Should Amazon be suing people who make $5 for a false review? What, if anything, should they do about false reviews? Do customer reviews actually make sense? Are you familiar with any Indonesian literature? Is there another culture you’d like to see get a focus from Amazon? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

*聽I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)聽By the way, it鈥檚 been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to 鈥渟tart at AmazonSmile鈥 if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Found in translation

October 14, 2015

Found in translation

I’ve never read Jules Verne, Miguel de Cervantes, or Karel 膶apek.

Oh, I’ve read 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Don Quixote, and War with the Newts, of course.

I just haven’t read them in their original languages (French, Spanish, and Czech).

Even though our adult kid is a linguist, I’m simply聽not fluent enough (if at all). I can blunder through an article in Spanish, and I did three years of Russian in high school. On the latter, I wanted to be able to read some research being done in the then Soviet Union…but I didn’t really become conversational.

I did learn all of Mangani, the language the “apes” speak in the Tarzan books, but that’s not the same thing.馃槈

So many of the classics so many of us have read are translations!

I’ll admit, I don’t generally pay much attention to who the translator is of a book. I probably should pay more attention to that. Translated books often seem…stilted to me. I think they tend to use the “correct” language in English, when 聽the author is being slangy in their own.

I knew someone who was a translator. Out of curiosity, this person put “hit the road” (an American English idiom meaning to get on your way) into an online translator (this was more than a decade ago) and had it translate it to French…and then translated it back from French to English using the same software.

The result was “pummel the avenue”.馃檪

I just tried the same experiment with Google translate…and the retranslation was rendered properly as “hit the road”.

Amazon’s traditional publishing wing has had an imprint devoted to translating works into English for some time:

AmazonCrossing
AmazonCrossing homepage in the Kindle store (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit by shopping*)

It has been very successful for them…one of their biggest successes has been

The Hangman鈥檚 Daughter (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) by Oliver P枚tzsch

and its sequels.

The first book, nearly five years on, is still in the #250 paid bestsellers in the USA Kindle store.

There are 809 books published by AmazonCrossing in the USA Kindle store:

AmazonCrossing books in the USA Kindle Store (at AmazonSmile*)

Generally, they seem to be well-reviewed (there are exceptions), and there are some with thousands of reviews.

I just recently read one I got as one of the

Kindle First books (at AmazonSmile*)

Prime members can generally get one a month (sometimes it’s two) for free to own.

The one I read was

The Capital of Latecomers (at AmazonSmile*) by Nena Nenova (and translated by Vladimir Poleganov)

I would say the translation was pretty good…I wasn’t thrilled with the book itself, although there were some interesting elements.

Clearly, Amazon also thinks AmazonCrossing is working.

They sent me this

Press Release

announcing a fresh $10 million investment “… over the next five years to increase the number and diversity of its books in translation”.

Interestingly, they now have a website where authors/publishers can submit books for the program. You can do that here:

https://translation.amazon.com/submissions

They are looking for books in these categories:

  • Fantasy
  • Historical Fiction
  • Literary Fiction
  • Memoir
  • Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense
  • Romance
  • Science Fiction
  • Women’s Fiction
  • Young Adult Fiction

Looks to me like they have around fifty languages from which they will translate (if the book is selected).

Amazon has been a leader on globalizing its e-book devices (they dominated the NOOK on that). They have also been an important way for authors/publishers to reach readers, both as a platform (Kindle Direct Publishing) and as a traditional publisher.

This combines those two strengths.

Amazon could certainly publishes books in the original languages…and in several other languages eventually.

They don’t list the terms on the submission site: that may be negotiated on an individual basis.

I think this is important.

It’s a great goodwill thing for Amazon’s relationships with other countries…even if books aren’t a huge part of their revenue stream.

What do you think? Do you like reading translated books? Do you seek out individual translators? Do you know someone who has had a book published and translated? If so, what was their experience like? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

*聽I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)聽By the way, it鈥檚 been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to 鈥渟tart at AmazonSmile鈥 if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Amazon announcement storm: precursor to hardware announcement?

September 16, 2015

Amazon announcement storm: precursor to hardware announcement?

Amazon has put out six press releases (well, okay…two of them were the same, just in different languages) in the last two days.

The last time that happened was in June…when the

Amazon Echo (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

became generally available.

I checked: there was also a flurry around the time of the announcement about new models last year in September.

Now, this pattern is different…those press releases came afterwards or were concurrent. These are (perhaps only very slightly) before.

However, I think that part of what may happen is that Amazon is arranges deals and creates features to make the release of hardware even more exciting. They want heightened interest in Amazon generally as well at that time, and goodwill.

These announcements also give you options even if you aren’t interested in buying new hardware.

Amazon Prime Members Enjoy Digital Access to The Washington Post for Free

The upshot here?

“Prime members can now enjoy six months of free unlimited access to The Washington Post National Digital Edition, a subscription usually retailing for $9.99 per month. After the first six months of access to world-class national and international news, Prime members can continue to enjoy unlimited digital access with a discounted monthly subscription rate of only $3.99, a savings of 60% per month.”

I did enjoy the Washington Post (owned by Amazon Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos) when we got it for free for six months on Fire tablets, which I wrote about it:

Washington Post free on Kindle聽Fire

Even though I could have continued it at a very low cost, I didn’t. It was one of those things where I have enough to read without it, and it was symbolically challenging for me to pay for it at all.

I figure I’ll read it for the six months, and then cancel it again. I don’t feel like that’s cheating: I’m paying for Prime anyway, and they aren’t asking me to get it only if I think I might subscribe.

Note that this time it is for Prime members (not based on having a Fire tablet), and you can read it on many platforms…including the website.

Oh, this isn’t available for current subscribers, by the way…so I guess it’s a good thing I didn’t sign up before.馃槈

Start here:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/primeoffer

Now Available: The Complete Sex and the City Series on Prime Video

Amazon started giving Prime Members free streaming access to older seasons of some HBO shows a bit more than a year ago

Round up #255: authors鈥 insults, HBO聽ruh-roh

and now they’ve added the complete Sex and the City.

Interestingly, it is available for download for offline watching. The selection of downloadable Prime Videos has gotten much better recently: a lot more well-known titles. This is a way that Amazon differentiates itself from Netflix and Hulu, and it looks like it wants to push that.

Downloadable titles (for Prime members, at no additional cost) now include:

  • Transparent
  • Downton Abbey
  • Extant
  • Grimm
  • Under the Dome
  • American Horror Story
  • Wallace & Gromit: the Complete Collection
  • Curious George
  • Vikings
  • Justified
  • Orphan Black
  • Teen Wolf (the new MTV version)
  • 24: Live Another Day
  • Sons of Anarchy
  • Hand of God
  • Girls

Note that it isn’t all seasons of those, but this is still nice!

Oh, and movies, too, including:

  • Pulp Fiction
  • The Bling Ring
  • Kill Bill
  • Spy Kids
  • Life After Beth
  • Good Will Hunting
  • Under the Skin
  • Sling Blade
  • Spring Breakers
  • The Neverending Story
  • Ella Enchanted

Amazon Fire TV鈥擫argest and Fastest Growing Selection of Any Streaming Media Player

This one was a general Fire TV announcement (and they might be introducing a new version of it, I suppose). That might be in part a response to the new Apple TV announcement…that sounds cool, but it’s relatively expensive. Apple TV will start at $149, as opposed to $99 for the

Amazon Fire TV聽(at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

and $39 for the

Fire TV Stick (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Hey! The Fire TV is unavailable! Very good chance that means an announcement for a new gen soon…before the end of the week I would guess. I know, I know…I didn’t think that was the case with the Fire Phone when I wrote about it yesterday, but this is different…especially with the announcements of new content.

The press release includes these interesting bits:

  • “Popular new titles include AT&T U-Verse, HBO NOW, Pac Man 256, Orbitz, Quiplash, Tastemade, and Tennis Channel Everywhere. FOX NOW, FXNOW, Poker Central, and Turner Classic Movies will be coming to the platform soon.”

If TCM is free (to watch the movies, not just to get the app), I’m an especially happy camper.馃檪

This is also useful:

“Fire TV integrated universal search from the very beginning, and customers have loved being able to easily search across multiple services, including HBO GO, Showtime, Hulu, STARZ PLAY, ENCORE PLAY, and Vevo. Plus, Amazon will be adding over 10 services to universal search by the end of the year, including A&E, HISTORY, Lifetime, and PBS.”

Amazon Continues to Expand its Superfast Delivery Service: Prime Now Lands in Los Angeles Featuring Tens of Thousands of Items from Amazon, Local Store Deliveries Coming Soon

Prime Now is this incredible, two-hour delivery service (you can pay $7.99 to get something in one hour).

They are establishing four (!) hubs for this in Southern California, and will be covering quite a few cities (“Los Angeles and Orange County including areas such as Santa Monica, Redondo Beach, Silver Lake and Irvine, to name a few…”).

Additionally, they’ll deliver from some local stores, like Sprouts. My Significant Other likes an Icelandic yogurt called Siggi’s which we can get at Sprouts…but it’s never a good shopping experience. We aren’t covered by Prime Now (yet), but getting it deliveed in two hours at no additional cost? Yes, please.

Amazon Announces Finalists of Second Indie Literary Contest for Spanish-Language

For a final press release, also available in Spanish:

Amazon Anuncia los Finalistas del Segundo Concurso Literario de Autores ‘Indie’ en Espa帽ol

we get something that has to do specifically with books.馃檪

Amazon has been taking submissions of unpublished books in Spanish, and they are down to five finalists. See this page for more information:

http://www.amazon.com/concursoindie (at AmazonSmile*)

The winner will “have the opportunity” to be published in print, audio, and e-book by Amazon.

The winner will be announced October 15th.

There you go!

In the middle of writing this, I tweeted about the Fire TV unavailability…I wanted to get that out before Amazon made an announcement.馃槈

What do you think? Is Amazon about to announce new hardware? What does it mean that they are taking more interest in non-English publishing? Does all of this have to do with new models, or is it just a coincidence and build up for the holiday season? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

*聽I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Irish edition books in the USA Kindle store

March 17, 2015

Irish edition books in the USA Kindle store

I pay some attention to the number books in languages other than English in the USA Kindle store.

It’s possible my聽聽curiosity about that is enhanced because our adult kid is a linguist.:)

Still, it sometimes seems strange to me which languages have more books.

I decided to take a look at how many books said they were “Irish editions”:

Kindle Store : Kindle eBooks : Foreign Languages : Other Languages : Irish : (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Turned out there was a grand total of…16.

There are 106 “Swahili edition” books.

There are over 133,000 “Spanish edition” books.

Interesting…

I went to Amazon.co.uk (the United Kingdom store) and there were 131 results.

That brings up a question I see a lot on the Amazon Kindle forums: “Why can’t I buy books from Amazon.co.uk?” or one of the other sites.

People don’t see the reason why they shouldn’t be able to buy e-books from any of the sites…they can buy p-books (paperbooks) from the UK site, for example.

Well, it has to do with copyright…and with how digital sales are evaluated.

Most (but not quite all) countries in the world recognize in some way the ability of an author to control the use of their created works (within certain limitations).

The author traditionally then licenses the works to publishers, who sell it to the public.

Those rights are normally licensed by format and by market (which could be an individual country, but might be more).

So, it could be that Publisher A licensed the e-book rights for XYZ book in England, and Publisher B licensed the e-book rights for that same book, XYZ, for the USA.

If Publisher A crosses the territories and sells the book in the USA, they’ve violated the agreement…and could be in big trouble.

“But,” you say, “you mentioned people buying p-books intended for Britain in the USA…how does that work?”

Basically, the p-book sale is considered to have taken place where the store is. The store might need an export license, but they could send it to you.

Remember that the publisher didn’t sell the book to someone in the USA…the store did. The publisher did not sell it outside of their licensed market.

With e-books, though, the sale is generally considered to have taken place where the purchaser is.

If a publisher who is supposed to be selling to England sells an e-book to someone in the USA, they’ve crossed territories.

That’s the main difference between e-books and p-books on this.

How do they know where you live?

They might judge it on where your credit card is processed. They can do it other ways, and yes, sometimes they are wrong about it.

You can change your country setting at

http://wwww.amazon.com/manageyourkindle

under Settings.

I wouldn’t do that unless you are actually living in that other country, though. I wouldn’t want to be committing fraud by misrepresenting where I was. They could likely figure that out if nothing else matches the country in which you say you live.

Another issue can be “public domain”. Not all countries have the same copyright term. A book which is in the public domain (owned by the public…not under copyright protection) in Australia (like George Orwell’s 1984) may not be in the USA. That particular book created quite a problem for Amazon, when a version intended for Australia was accidentally made available to Americans…and then Amazon took it back from people.

I think their聽intentions were good, and they compensated people more than they had originally paid for it (and they promised never t do it again). There are people who are still soured on Amazon over it, though, so you can imagine what it might be like if Amazon didn’t make good faith efforts to sell the books in the proper markets.

I do think the selling of global rights is becoming much more common (even though it might cost the publisher more initially), so this may become less of an issue over time.

Bain sult as!

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile.聽When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Round up #285: reading declines, Kindle Unlimited expands to Canada and Mexico

February 13, 2015

Round up #285: reading declines, Kindle Unlimited expands to Canada and Mexico

The ILMK Round ups聽are聽short pieces which may or may not be expanded later.

Kindle Unlimited launches in Mexico and Canada

As a publisher (I only publish my own works…which I would guess is true of most Kindle Direct Publishing authors) who has books in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Amazon just informed me that KU is expanding to Canada and Mexico!

That’s exciting…I like having it very much. It’s an “all you can read” plan, $9.99 a month in the USA. Here’s the link for the information page

Kindle Unlimited in Mexico

where it is 129 pesos a month, and for

Kindle Unlimited Canada

where it is $9.99 (Canadian) a month.

Chri

Echo videos from Phink, one of my readers

One of my regular readers and commenters, Phink, recently got an Amazon聽Echo, Amazon’s ambient computing device. It’s an always on voice input device which plays music, answers all kinds of questions, and more.

Phink has posted what I think are a couple of the best videos I’ve seen so far about the Echo. They aren’t really reviews, they are demonstrations of what the device can do. If you are interested in the Echo, I think they are definitely worth watching to see what your experience might be like.

I appreciate Phink sharing these! I’ll be happy to write about the Echo, but my delivery date still says between May 27th and July 2nd.

Publishers Weekly: No Panic Over 15 Percent Drop in Christian Fiction Sales

Christian fiction has been a strong category of seller, but from 2013 to 2014, according to this

Publishers Weekly article by Ann Byle

sales dropped 15%. The article goes on to say why the publishers aren’t worried about that…I guess they have faith.馃槈

Video news

I thought I’d group a couple of things together here…a mini-round up.馃槈

First, this is just odd to me, but Amazon Studios is working with Sid and Marty Krofft to do a reimagined pilot of one of their series. The Kroffts were really gonzo “kids’ show” producers in the 1970s, although they did a lot more than that.

So, what gets the reboot? The most popular H.R. Pufnstuf? The wacky Lidsville? Electra Woman and Dyna Girl? Nope…Sigmund and the Sea Monsters. This may take a lot of reimagining…Sigmund’s parents were parodies of Archie Bunker and Phyllis Diller, and I just don’t think that’s going to fly with today’s audiences. Hoping they stick with the Johnny Whitaker theme song, though.馃檪

press release

Second, Fire TV, which is both the

Fire TV Stick (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

and the

Amazon Fire TV聽(at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

have added a bunch of apps, including the much talked about Sling TV (which may enable some people to drop cable…by paying for a much more focused package), TED (great, though-provoking lectures…this one is free), and Fox Sports GO.

press release

Only 40% of 17 year olds read at least one a week for fun

I do think that e-books have enabled and encourage a lot of people to read more, but stats like the ones in this

EBOOK FRIENDLY post by Ola Kowalczyk

are troubling.

It’s nothing particularly new…as kids get older, fewer of them report reading for fun.

Part of that may be that they have to read so much more for school…a high schooler presumably has a lot more assigned reading than a nine-year old. If they are enjoying that reading, it would probably still not be reported as “reading for pleasure”.

What’s troubling is the decline across age groups since 1984.

It’s possible that there was a big decline (let’s see…video games, maybe?) for a while, and that e-books are, in fact, increasing reading.

Still, the Common Sense Media data reported on here (and shown in an infographic) is not especially encouraging. On the good side, more than a quarter of homes have an EBR (E-Book Reader…they mention Kindles and NOOKs. That would not include tables, like the Kindle Fire).

Big update for Kindle for iOS (4.7)

In this

Kindle Forum thread (at AmazonSmile*)

an update for the iOS (Apple mobile…iPhones, iPads) app is announced.

It includes eTextbooks and the “Book Browser” feature that brings you information about the book (new for iPhones).

Flipboard redesigns Flipboard for the web

This is a big improvement!

I’ve written about my free Flipboard magazines here before.

I read it in the

Flipboard聽(at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

app, which I read every morning on my

Kindle Fire HDX聽(at AmazonSmile*)

For my readers who didn’t have Fires, though, I know the experience trying to read them聽in a browser on a PC wasn’t great.

Well, if you’ve tried it before, check it out again at

https://flipboard.com/

I like what they’ve done it with it: it looks much better, and seems to be less resource intensive.

Hope you enjoyed my birthday!馃槈

We had a great time…we went to Point Isabel in Richmond (rated as one of the top ten dog parks in the world)…our dogs love it there! We also get about an hour walk, two or three miles. I went to doctor yesterday for an annual check-up, and to the DMV to renew my license. When I did the DMV thing, I realized that my weight is down about 55 pounds since I last did a driver’s license! I’m down about 40 pound in the last two years, thanks to the free app I reviewed here:

Review: MyFitnessPal

Well, that, and a lot of work.馃檪 I figure another year and I’ll be in good shape.

Then we tried a new restaurant, and the food was good.

After that, we saw The Theory of Everything. That’s one of the Best Picture nominees we hadn’t seen. I thought it was good, and was glad I had done my personal

2015 BOPMadness (Bufo鈥檚 Oscar Prediction聽Madness)

predictions before I saw it. When you think a movie is good, it can skew your predictions…you tend to think the Academy will like it better than you might if you had not seen it.

I also got a book…always a good thing! I’ll wait until I’ve read a bit before I say anything about it, and I’ll likely do a Goodreads review.

Hope it was a great day for you, too!

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

*When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

The bestselling USA Kindle store books…in Spanish

February 8, 2015

The bestselling USA Kindle store books…in Spanish

One of the knocks on the USA Kindle store in the beginning (back in 2007) was the lack of books in Spanish and other non-English languages.

That’s an understandable concern.

While something like one out of ten people in the USA is considered a “Spanish speaker” (speaks Spanish at home), and we are, I think, the fifth largest Spanish speaking country in the world, we didn’t have as many as ten thousand Spanish books in the USA Kindle store until the summer 2011 (about three and a half years聽after the Kindle store first opened).

Now, that situation has changed.

In my most recent monthly Snapshot聽(taken on February 1st), there were 125,505 “Spanish edition” books in the USA Kindle store.

Looking at the percentage of the total, we see:

  • February 2010: 2,548 Spanish books out of 415,100 = .06%
  • February 2015: 125,505 Spanish books out of 3,178,962 = 3%…about 50 times as high a percentage

What Spanish books there were initially seemed to me to be mostly public domain books, with some translations of current books.

I wanted to see if that had changed: has the USA Kindle store started carrying books which are not only in Spanish, but serve the Spanish speaking market(s)?

I thought it might. In December of 2011, Amazon opened a Kindle store in Spain. My hypothesis was that having that would accelerate the number of books available in Spanish, and that those might then make their way to the USA store.

Well, looking at the

Spanish books in the USA Kindle store by bestselling (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

that seems to be the case!

I should point out first that I don’t speak Spanish.馃檪 I use Spanish as an example to get what I am guessing is the best case for a non-English language in the USA store.

I know a bit about Spanish language literature, just from my reading, and I’ll research (which is fun for me) things I don’t.

I shouldn’t have been quite so dogmatic above that I don’t speak Spanish, actually.

I used to speak it near at about a tourist level, and I find I can still read it to some extent. I don’t always need Google translate to understand a news story, although there may certainly be words I don’t know.

For example, when our adult kid was home a couple of years ago, we had telenovelas on TV…oh, and German YouTube and Turkish movies…did I mention my kid is a linguist?馃槈 I could understand it well enough to say, “She doesn’t like him, right?” Although at one point, a couple of kids on the show were watching their mother on a TV singing competition, and things started levitating around the room. My kid explained that they were telekinetic…gee, how had I never learned the Spanish word for telekinesis?馃槈

Another great example: I was an actor many years ago. We were going out to schools, doing an interactive version of the Wizard of Oz…we would have kids come join us on stage to be part of the show.

At one school, we were told that there were two groups of kids who only spoke Spanish.

I volunteered to take a group, and so did the actor playing the Wizard.

We did okay…but we did run into some vocabulary issues! I couldn’t figure out “haunted forest”, so I went with “arboles misteriosas” (mysterious trees…or close to it). The other actor asked me for “Wicked Witch”…I suggested “bruja mala”. Couldn’t fake “flying monkey”, though…I had to mime it.馃檪

Here we go!

1. Mafalda Y Las Fiestas (Mafalda and the Holidays) by Quino

This is an Argentinean comic strip from the 1960s. While Mafalda’s look reminds me of Little Lulu, my understanding is that this is a strip which also appeals to adults…sort of like Calvin & Hobbes or The Simpsons in that way. It was popular outside of Argentina, but I’m still impressed that country has the number one spot, when there are so many Spanish speaking countries with a strong literary history and which are more commonly translated in the USA.聽Mafalda is also available in English in the store.

2. Adulterio (Adultery) by Paolo Coelho

This one is translated…but from the聽聽Portuguese, not from English. 聽 Coelho is from Brazil…and the translated version of The Alchemist was a big hit in the USA as well. This is a title just from last year, 2014, showing that the selection has moved beyond classics.

3. El Asesinato de Pit谩goras (The Assassination of Pythagoras) by Marcos Chicot

According to the product page, this was the bestselling e-book in Spanish in the world in 2013. It’s a murder mystery with historical characters. Chicot is from Spain.

4. Merriam-Webster’s Spanish-English Translation Dictionary

Well, not exactly a book in Spanish…

5. El capital en el siglo XXI (Capital in the 21st Century) by Thomas Petty

Very popular in English as well…

6. La isla de las mariposas (Butterfly Island) by Corinna Bowman

7. El C铆rculo (The Circle) by Mario Escobar

This one is also available through Kindle Unlimited, which has quite a few books in Spanish.

8. Cien a帽os de soledad (100 Years of Solitude) by Gabriel Garc铆a M谩rquez

Very popular around the world (including in the USA), and a multiple-reward recipient.

9. Trucos para escribir mejor (Tips for Writing Better by Carlos Vastas

10. El umbral de la eternidad (Edge of Eternity) by Ken Follett.

This one was a popular book in Engish…very popular.

That was an interesting survey of the books for me! I’m happy to see it’s a somewhat cosmopolitan selection. The topics and “feel” of the books will be different.

Moving a bit closer to “every book every written) being in the Kindle store. :))

Enjoy!

Join thousands聽of readers and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

More than half a million non-English books in the USA Kindle store

January 19, 2015

More than half a million books non-English books聽in the USA Kindle store

One area where we continue to see growth is in the number of books in the USA Kindle store in languages other than English.

The

Foreign Languages (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

part has 511,843 titles at the time of writing.

The languages breakdown this way:

Those “other languages” cover quite a range…and these categorizations don’t necessarily capture all of the titles.

This how Other Languages expands:

When I checked about a year ago

Non-English books in the USA Kindle store

there were 80,230 Spanish books listed…so in one year, it has increased by about 45%.

I think we will continue to see more and more books in languages other than English.

It’s not as simple as someone translating a book, by the way. Even a book available in another language at a different Amazon site, can’t just be made available in the USA Kindle store without licensing it.

There are 3,301,270 books in Amazon’s Kindle store for Spain at time of writing. Those aren’t all in Spanish, I’m sure, but certainly, there are a lot more books in Spanish in the Spanish store than there are in the USA store.

I believe global rights are becoming more common when books are licensed from the author or the author’s estate.

However, that still doesn’t mean that every book in a language will be made available at every site.

In some cases, the publisher may believe that the book is only appropriate in certain countries. A book specifically about a popular telenovela star might not sell well in the USA when it might in Mexico, for instance.

You might figure, “Why not make it available anyway?” I can understand that idea, but there are costs involved with selling a book, including Customer Service.

I’d love to see every book available everywhere, but that’s just unlikely to happen.

By the way, as an example of another language, there is a Klingon translation of Hamlet in the store. Text-to-speech is not enabled on it, though, so I’m not linking to it.

That’s an interesting point by itself.

You need to have an appropriate voice available for a language to work well with TTS. If you try to use an English speaking TTS voice with Spanish, you’ll get massive mispronunciations.

That’s not just because of the difference in vowel sounds.

The way that TTS works is that a voice artist reads lots and lots of material into a system.

Where the system can match up what was read to what’s in the book, it can use that…which is why things like both “Kansas” and “Arkansas” can be pronounced differently, and why there actually is some inflection in phrases.

For more information on that, see

An ILMK interview with September Day, the voice of the Kindle Fire聽HD

Increasingly, we are getting software that can do better translation, but again, that could fall afoul of copyright laws. Making and marketing a new translation of a book under copyright protection in the USA generally requires authorization. I’m not quite sure how that would work if it was done in a streaming fashion, though, without the translation being set into a “permanent” form. My guess is that might be okay, similar to the way that you don’t need for permission for text-to-speech, but do need it for a recorded audiobook.

I will check back on these counts again in the future.

Bonus story: this

GeekWire article by Todd Bishop

links to a podcast where they had the

Amazon Echo

on as a guest.

They were doing it tongue in cheek, but this was one of the better demonstrations of what the Echo can do that I’ve seen…er, heard.馃槈

I thought I might do something like that (using a synthesized voice to ask the Echo questions) when I eventually get one, and I may still.

Join more than a thousand readers聽and try the free聽ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

*聽I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you鈥檒l be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)鈥nd the good feeling you鈥檒l get.聽:)聽Shop 鈥檛il you help!聽:)聽By the way, it鈥檚 been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to 鈥渟tart at AmazonSmile鈥 if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the聽I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy聽聽Amazon Gift Cards聽from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.


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