Archive for the ‘News’ Category

September 2015 Kindle book releases

August 23, 2015

September 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 6,916 (at time of writing…1,932 more than last month. That makes sense, though…September is getting into the holiday season as far as book releases go) September releases in the USA Kindle store:

September 2015 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Of those, by the way, 1,067 (279 more than last month) are in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

about 15% (about 1% fewer than last month).

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

In the past several  months, the top four had been the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month.

Amazon no longer does the “New and Popular” search as a default, but does “Featured”. Presumably, a human being picks those titles in some way…and the list is clearly not the same. Last month, the top four weren’t Kindle First…this time, they are (again). There’s also a link that identifies them as Kindle First books, and will take you to that page. It’s an interesting choice, on Amazon’s part. I like curation, generally, but I think of Amazon’s book search results based on impartial data, but that’s not the case any more.

The other thing is that some of those Kindle Unlimited titles are way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • The Keeper (Vega Jane, Book 2) by David Baldacci
  • Library of Souls: The Third Novel of Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
  • Driving Heat (Nikki Heat Book 7) by Richard Castle
  • Archmage (Homecoming) by R. A. Salvatore
  • Phishing for Phools: The Economics of Manipulation and Deception by George A. Akerlof and Robert J. Shiller
  • Big Nate: Welcome to My World (AMP! Comics for Kids) by Lincoln Peirce
  • The Last Chance Christmas Ball by Mary Jo Putney and Jo Beverley
  • Hunter by Mercedes Lackey
  • Journey to Star Wars: The Force Awakens: Lost Stars by Claudia Gray and Phil Noto
  • The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan by Ian Buruma
  • Blood Feud: The Clintons vs. The Obamas by Edward Klein
  • Don’t Let Anything Dull Your Sparkle: How to Break Free of Negativity and Drama by Doreen Virtue
  • Batman Vol. 7: Endgame by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo
  • Sweet Caress by William Boyd
  • Purity: A Novel by Jonathan Franzen
  • Evolution 2.0: Breaking the Deadlock Between Darwin and Design by Perry Marshall
  • The Girl in the Spider’s Web: A Lisbeth Salander novel, continuing Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Series by David Lagercrantz
  • You Win in the Locker Room First: The 7 C’s to Build a Winning Team in Business, Sports, and Lifeby Jon Gordon and Mike Smith
  • The Autobiography of James T. Kirk by David A. Goodman
  • Wildest Dreams (Thunder Point series) by Robyn Carr
  • Make Me: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child
  • The Bark Before Christmas (A Melanie Travis Mystery Book 18) by Laurien Berenson
  • Cook County ICU: 30 Years of Unforgettable Patients and Odd Cases by Cory Franklin, MD
  • The White Ghost (Billy Boyle World War II Mystery Book 10) by James R. Benn
  • Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner
  • The Girl With the Deep Blue Eyes by Lawrence Block
  • Finale: A Novel of the Reagan Years by Thomas Mallon
  • The WikiLeaks Files: The World According to US Empire by WikiLeaks and Julian Assange
  • The Gifted Puppy Program: 40 Games, Activities, and Exercises to Raise a Brilliant, Happy Dog by Laurie Leach
  • Mycroft Holmes by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse
  • Ivory Vikings: The Mystery of the Most Famous Chessmen in the World and the Woman Who Made Them by Nancy Marie Brown
  • Undercover by Danielle Steel
  • The Neanderthals Rediscovered: How Modern Science Is Rewriting Their Story by Dimitra Papagianni and Michael A. Morse
  • The Quotable Feynman by Richard P. Feynman and Michelle Feynman

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

New York Times describes Amazon as a “Bruising Workplace”; Bezos responds

August 18, 2015

New York Times describes Amazon as a “Bruising Workplace”; Bezos responds

A couple of my readers called my attention to this

New York Times article by Jodi Kantor and David Streitfeld

I had seen that it existed but it’s quite lengthy, and it took me until today to read it all.

In the meantime, I had even seen it referenced in the “news crawl” on a 24 hour news channel.

The article is entitled “Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace”.

Amazon has faced accusations of being an unsafe workplace (in particular, heat issues in warehouses), but this doesn’t claim that Amazon is doing anything illegal (at least not directly: they reference the heat issue, but didn’t investigate it).

It does claim that the company is…unempathetic. It says, essentially, that coworkers can criticize their teammates…without being identified to the accused.

It describes what could be interpreted as a harmfully competitive environment.

Jeff Bezos has responded, as referenced in this

CNN Money article by David Goldman

and other places, including this

GeekWire article by John Cook

which reproduces Bezos’ memo.

Having read both, I have a few takeaways:

  • Based on the articles, Amazon isn’t doing things that are illegal
  • It’s hard to work at Amazon…definitely challenging
  • It’s possible that some managers at Amazon have treated some  employees without compassion
  • If that is the case, it troubles me that Jeff Bezos says that isn’t the Amazon that Bezos know. If it as indicated (the NYT claims to have spoken with 100 employees and ex-employees), it would trouble me that Bezos woudn’t  know
  • Some of the good things which have come out of Amazon have happened because of their unconventional policies
  • Update: looking at more responses, I also want to say that part of the reaction to this might be people assuming that what is reported is specific to Amazon, when it might be much wider spread. It may be seen as unique to Amazon, when it could actually be a broad indictment of not uncommon corporate behavior. That’s not to say that Amazon doesn’t do some things differently…it does. However, it may be that it just does some things more effectively than some others. Many companies would like to cull their lowest performers every year…Amazon might just be better at it
  • Update: the biggest concern for many people here will be the stories of unempathetic treatment…that after someone has had a family tragedy, they are punished for lowered performance during that period. I can tell you that that is not the case where I work: I’ve coworkers out for long periods due to personal challenges, and be supported and welcomed back by management. Again, though, it’s not illegal (and it may not be  unusual) to judge someone’s performance regardless of extenuating circumstances, as long as the law if followed in terms of family leave and such. In my opinion, not illegal…but not necessarily wise, either

I’ve been a successful manager, and I would not lead my team using the techniques alleged. It was always a big thing to me (and still is) that the team works together.

I don’t like competition within the team…I think it is counter productive.

Let me give you an example.

I was managing trainers, who are naturally inclined to want to help other people (it’s what we do for a living).

We had evaluations from students.

When I became manager, there had been a bonus for the person with the highest evaluation average.

That seemed like a bad thing to me.

To have the highest average doesn’t mean that you have to improve what you are doing. If you could make everyone else do worse, that would be enough.

Again, trainers wouldn’t do that consciously: but would they work after hours to help someone else improve their scores? It would be hard to justify taking the time away from their families, if it could also cost those families money.

I proposed a change, which was accepted…and seemed to really help.

We changed it to say that if the team reached an overall average goal, we randomly selected someone who had made a minimum score to receive the bonus.

You couldn’t get the bonus twice, until everybody on the team had won it once.

In other words, you needed to  make sure everybody on the team did well to have a chance at a bonus. If they did, you would eventually get a bonus…even if your score wasn’t the highest that week.

Every Microsoft certified training center in the USA (might have been North America) had to use the same evaluation system with Microsoft…I think it was thousands of teams.

We were sometimes #1, usually top ten.

That thinking was alien to the sales manager…sales teams usually rely on competition. I greatly credit that sales manager for recognizing the value of my suggestion for my team.

What is alleged (not proven…but my guess is that the article’s authors are reporting accurately what they had heard) isn’t what I would want in my company, and isn’t what has worked for me. My guess is that it would produce some  good results…and suppress others.  I don’t think it would be illegal…just, for me, ill advised.

My intuition is that Jeff Bezos wouldn’t have known about it…that it would have been something that developed in a loosely supervised, decentralized company, where the people in Seattle might not have a firm hand on the corporate culture in New York, for example.

If that’s the case, and this is all speculation, I think it could be fixed.

None of this makes me any less likely to shop at Amazon. It would be different if what was alleged was illegal.

The presentation in the article is more of people being jerks than being crooks.

I think the article is significant enough  to have an impact…and that’s a good thing.

What do you think?  Do you believe the article? If so, does it change how you feel about being an Amazon customer? Is competition necessary within a team? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Bonus deal: this may be too late for some of you, but two of Amazon’s Fire tablets are $30 off today only:

Update: thanks to two of my regular readers (Harold Delk and Edward Boyhan) and commenters for catching me on a substitution error. I have corrected that error (I had attributed something the NYT did do another (main)streamer…and the two are quite different), which has improved this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Perhaps the most ridiculous p to e comparison I’ve ever seen

August 12, 2015

Perhaps the most ridiculous p to e comparison I’ve ever seen

Okay, I’m not prone to use words like “ridiculous” in describing other people’s opinions…and I don’t really think I’m doing that here.

The chart (really more of a table) presented in this

EBOOK FRIENDLY post

hypothetically doesn’t offer an opinion, although it does have some evaluative comments (“incredibly hard”).

What it does is compare a paperbook (p-book) to a

All-New Kindle Paperwhite, 6″ High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

and to an iPad.

It compares price, weight, battery life, pros, and cons.

However…

Notice that I said it compares “a paperbook”.

That’s like comparing an apple to a bushel of oranges. ;)

They list the cost of a p-book at $15.52…and the cost of a Paperwhite at $120.

It would make more sense to compare a bookcase to a Paperwhite.

If we start out saying that a bookcase costs, oh, $100, that’s still not the way to do it.

Even if we discount the free cloud storage (which would be a big mistake), a Paperwhite can hold what would be many bookcases worth of books.

We’ll go with…you want the complete works of Shakespeare, the Harry Potter series, and the top five New York Times hardback fiction equivalent bestsellers…plus a single bookcase or a Paperwhite. We’ll use $100 for the bookcase, $120 for the Paperwhite.

Shakespeare in hardback (that seems to be their comparison): I’m finding new ones for as low as about $25.

Shakespeare in e-book: free

At this point, we are close enough to even. :)

Harry Potter hardback boxed set of the 7: $116.55 (that’s a considerable discount, by the way)

Harry Potter in e-book: $57.54…oh, and you could read them all in a month for $9.99 with

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

but you don’t own them then, so that’s not really a fair comparison.

The e-book choice is about $40 cheaper at this point.

Now, let’s add in the bestsellers:

P-book E-book
$16.07 $13.99
$13.47 $6.99
$15.29 $13.99
$16.70 $11.43
$15.14 $12.99
$76.67 $59.39
 Difference $17.28

I simply don’t think you can reasonably suggest that it is less expensive to have a library of p-books than a library of e-books.

Yes, you can re-sell p-books…but if you don’t, you pay to store them. It’s rent/property taxes/mortgage for the floor under the bookcase. As a former brick-and-mortar bookstore manager, I had to always make that calculation…it’s why a slow-selling book couldn’t profitably be kept sitting around in the store…you would eventually have lost money keeping it there.

The pros and cons listed also seem…odd, to me.

I don’t want to take too much away from the chart, so I’ll just mention one.

One of two cons listed under the Papewhite is “…Still not water-proof”.

You know, because p-books do just fine when you drop in the bathtub. ;)

Let me be very clear that the excellent EBOOK FRIENDLY did not create this chart. It appears in an interesting Wall Street Journal article (to which they link), and is reportedly based on the School Library Journal’s 2015 Book Pricing Report.

There are pros and cons to p-books, EBRs (E-Book Readers), and tablets…I just don’t think this chart presents them in a particularly useful way.

Oh, I am going to mention one more thing from the chart.

The iPad is described as “…hard to read on in the sun”.

The use of two prepositions in a row like that can be jarring (what was wrong with, “…hard to read in the sun”?). It reminds me of this old “joke” (it’s not exactly a joke) designed to make grammar purists react the way most people do to fingernails on a blackboard (which, I’ve heard, is so irritating because it is a similar frequency to a monkey’s panic vocalization…you don’t like the sound, because you think a leopard is about to leap into your troop).

A young child is sick upstairs.

A parent, wanting to console the child, brings in a book the child had loved a few years ago…but which the child now thinks they have outgrown.

The child says, “What did you bring that book I didn’t want to be read to out of up here for?”

;)

I’ve probably told this one before on this blog, but legendarily, Winston Churchill was upbraided for ending a sentence with a preposition. Churchill knew how to speak to the common people, and made the choice to use accessible language. Churchill’s reported response was, “…that is the sort of grammatical pedantry up with which I will not put.” :)

I would guess all of my readers could come with reasons why e-books can be better than p-books, so let me flip that: give me some arguments why having a library of p-books is better than a library of e-books. You can do that (and share other thoughts) for me and my readers by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

August 2015 Kindle book releases

July 20, 2015

August 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 4,984 (at time of writing…more than 200 more than last month) August releases in the USA Kindle store:

August 2015 USA Kindle Store Releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Of those, by the way, 788 (114 more than last month) are in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

about 16% (almost 3% fewer than last month).

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

In the past several  months, the top four had been the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month.

Amazon no longer does the “New and Popular” search as a default, but does “Featured”. Presumably, a human being picks those titles in some way…and the list is clearly not the same. Yes, the top book is a Kindle First book, but they aren’t the top four. It’s an interesting choice, on Amazon’s part. I like curation, generally, but I think of Amazon’s book search results based on impartial data, but that’s not the case any more.

The other thing is that some of those Kindle Unlimited titles are way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • X (Kinsey Millhone Book 24) by Sue Grafton
  • Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes (A Percy Jackson and the Olympians Guide) by Rick Riordan and John Rocco
  • Herculean (Cerberus Group Book 1) by Jeremy Robinson and Sean Ellis
  • Invisible by Jennifer Rothschild
  • Fool’s Quest: Book II of the Fitz and the Fool trilogy by Robin Hobb
  • Immortal Guardians (Spirit Animals: Fall of the Beasts, Book 1) by Eliot Schrefer
  • The End of All Things (Old Man’s War Book 6) by John Scalzi
  • The Phoenix of Destiny (Geronimo Stilton and the Kingdom of Fantasy) by Geronimo Stilton
  • The Nature of the Beast: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny
  • The Taming of the Queen by Philippa Gregory
  • Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream by Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Applied Minds: How Engineers Think by Guru Madhavan
  • Wind/Pinball: Two novels by Haruki Murakami and Ted Goossen
  • Edge of Darkness by Christine Feehan and Maggie Shayne
  • Trouble in Paradise: From the End of History to the End of Capitalism by Slavoj Zizek
  • Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat
  • The Thinker’s Thesaurus: Sophisticated Alternatives to Common Words (Expanded Third Edition) by Peter E. Meltzer
  • Coming of Age at the End of Days by Alice LaPlante
  • The Murderer’s Daughter: A Novel by Jonathan Kellerman
  • Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War by Raghu Karnad
  • Iron Wolf: A Novel by Dale Brown
  • Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books by Michael Dirda
  • Irona 700 by Dave Duncan
  • The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
  • The Marriage of Opposites by Alice Hoffman
  • New Methods for Crochet Socks by Rohn Strong
  • NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity by Steve Silberman
  • We Install: And Other Stories by Harry Turtledove
  • Sherlock Holmes: The Thinking Engine by James Lovegrove
  • Latest Readings by Clive James
  • Midnight on the Mississippi (Secrets of the South Mysteries) by Mary Ellis
  • Dragonbane (Dark-Hunter Novels Book 19) by Sherrilyn Kenyon
  • Frodo’s Journey: Discover the Hidden Meaning of The Lord of the Rings by Joseph Pearce
  • Of Goats & Governors: Six Decades of Colorful Alabama Political Stories by Steve Flowers and Edwin Bridges
  • The Making of a Navy SEAL: My Story of Surviving the Toughest Challenge and Training the Best by Brandon Webb and John David Mann
  • The State We’re In: Maine Stories by Ann Beattie
  • Dog Years: Faithful Friends, Then & Now by Amanda Jones
  • Archie 1000 Page Comics Jam (Archie 1000 Page Digests) by Archie Superstars
  • May Sarton: A Self-Portrait by May Sarton
  • Windows 10: The Personal Trainer (The Personal Trainer for Technology) by William Stanek
  • What Color Is Your Parachute? 2016: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers by Richard N. Bolles
  • Horror Show by Greg Kihn
  • The Face That Changed It All: A Memoir by Beverly Johnson and André Leon Talley
  • The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life by Janice Kaplan
  • Death at Hungerford Stairs: Charles Dickens & Superintendent Jones InvestigateAug 15, 2015 | Kindle eBook
    by J C Briggs

Well, again…quite the mix! It’s particularly interesting to see some famous “backlist” novels: Never Cry Wolf and The Bell Jar. There were also quite a few Ellery Queen books and Mr. Moto books.

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

July 2015 Kindle book releases

June 22, 2015

July 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 4,770 (at time of writing…more than 500 fewer than last month) July releases in the USA Kindle store:

July 2015 USA Kindle Store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Of those, by the way, 902 (about fifty more than last month) are in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

about 19% (almost 3% more than last month…a combination of fewer overall books  and more KU books).

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

In the past several  months, the top four had been the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month.

Amazon no longer does the “New and Popular” search as a default, but does “Featured”. Presumably, a human being picks those titles in some way…and the list is clearly not the same. Yes, the top book is a Kindle First book, but they aren’t the top four. It’s an interesting choice, on Amazon’s part. I like curation, generally, but I think of Amazon’s book search results based on impartial data, but that’s not the case any more.

The other thing is that some of those Kindle Unlimited titles are way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • Libraries, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Enabling Access and Promoting Inclusion by Paul T. Jaeger and Natalie Greene Taylora
  • Never Die Alone (A Bentz/Montoya Novel Book 8) by Lisa Jackson
  • From Small Screen to Vinyl: A Guide to Television Stars Who Made Records, 1950-2000 by Bob Leszczak
  • Words and Rules: The Ingredients Of Language (Science Masters Series) by Steven Pinker
  • Adapting Science Fiction to Television: Small Screen, Expanded Universe (Science Fiction Television) by Max Sexton and Malcolm Cook
  • Ideal by Ayn Rand
  • The Dinosaur Lords by Victor Milán
  • William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh: Star Wars Part the Second (William Shakespeare’s Star Wars) by Ian Doescher
  • Sex, Sadism, Spain, and Cinema: The Spanish Horror Film by Nicholas G. Schlegel
  • Down Among the Dead Men (A Detective Peter Diamond Mystery) by Peter Lovesey
  • The Poetry and Poetics of Michael Heller: A Nomad Memory by Jon Curley and Burt Kimmelman
  • Batman: Arkham Knight Vol. 1 by Peter J. Tomasi and Bogdanovic,Viktor
  • Animal Creativity and Innovation (Explorations in Creativity Research) by Allison B. Kaufman and James C. Kaufman
  • The Bourbon Kings by J.R. Ward
  • Nemesis (FBI Thriller, An Book 19) by Catherine Coulter
  • Speaking in Bones: A Novel (Temperance Brennan Book 18) by Kathy Reichs
  • Brush Back (V.I. Warshawski Novels Book 17) by Sara Paretsky
  • Morna’s Legacy (Box Set #2): Scottish Time Travel Romances (Morna’s Legacy Series) by Bethany Claire
  • Will Write for Food: The Complete Guide to Writing Cookbooks, Blogs, Memoir, Recipes, and More by Dianne Jacob
  • Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway?: Community Politics and Grassroots Activism during the New Negro Era (Culture, Labor, History) by Shannon King
  • National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of the World (National Geographic Little Kids First Big Books by Elizabeth Carney
  • The New Adventures of Ellery Queen (and a number of other Ellery Queen books) by Ellery Queen
  • How Memory Works–and How to Make It Work for You by Robert Madigan
  • Deliberate Receiving: Finally, the Universe Makes Some Freakin’ Sense! by Melody Fletcher
  • The Science of Conjecture by James Franklin
  • Justice Society of America: A Celebration of 75 Years by Geoff  Johns and Roy Thomas
  • Real People and the Rise of Reality Television by Michael McKenna
  • A Heritage of Stars by Clifford D. Simak
  • Alexander Hamilton: The Formative Years by Michael E. Newton
  • The Cthulhu Wars: The United States’ Battles Against the Mythos (Dark) by Kenneth Hite
  • Naked Greed (Stone Barrington)Jul 14, 2015 | Kindle eBook
    by Stuart Woods

Well, again…quite the mix!

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

June 2015 Kindle book releases

May 22, 2015

June 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 5,519 (at time of writing) June releases in the USA Kindle store:

June 2015 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Of those, by the way, 858 are in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

about 16% (a bit lower than last month).

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

One interesting thing before I get into some individual titles: the first four (sorted by new and popular) are the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month!

Since Prime members can already be reading one of these (even though they aren’t officially released until April) at no additional cost, you can see how that would drive up their popularity as compared to actual pre-orders. The top four being Kindle First was also true the last time I did one of these.

The other thing is that some of those Kindle Unlimited titles are way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • The Master Magician (The Paper Magician Series Book 3) by Charlie N. Holmberg
  • Manhattan Mayhem: New Crime Stories from Mystery Writers of America by Mary Higgins Clark and Lee Child
  • Connect: The Secret LinkedIn Playbook To Generate Leads, Build Relationships, And Dramatically Increase Your Sales by Josh Turner
  • Dirty Boys of Summer: Alphas, Billionaires, Bikers, and Jocks by Gennifer Albin and Evangeline Anderson (keep your eye open for this sort of thing…more than ten books in an omnibus for ninety-nine cents. I’m seeing more than just this one)
  • Tom Clancy Under Fire (A Jack Ryan Jr. Novel) by Grant Blackwood
  • In Plain Sight (Sisterhood) by Fern Michaels
  • Finders Keepers: A Novel by Stephen King
  • Adios, America: The Left’s Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World H*llhole by Ann Coulter
  • The Dalai Lama’s Cat and the Power of Meow by David Michie
  • Isn’t That Rich?: Life Among the 1 Percent by Richard Kirshenbaum and Michael Gross
  • Some Were In Time: Shift Happens Book Two by Robyn Peterman
  • Target Israel by Tim LaHaye and Ed Hindson
  • The Phantom Bully (Star Wars: Jedi Academy #3) by Jeffrey Brown
  • Downton Tabby (The Pampered Pets Series) by Sparkle Abbey
  • The Prince of Minor Writers: The Selected Essays of Max Beerbohm by Max Beerbohm and Phillip Lopate
  • No Sweat: How the Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You a Lifetime of Fitness by Michelle Segar
  • The Gentle Art of Murder: Dorothy Martin investigates (A Dorothy Martin Mystery) by Jeanne M. Dams
  • The Cost of Courage by Charles Kaiser
  • Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War by P. W. Singer and August Cole
  • The Paranormal Conspiracy: The Truth about Ghosts, Aliens, Mysterious Beings and the Deepest Longings of Your…by Timothy J. Dailey
  • Jewels of Allah: The Untold Story of Women in Iran by Nina Ansary
  • Margery Allingham’s Mr Campion’s Fox: A brand-new Albert Campion mystery written by Mike Ripley by Mike Ripley
  • The English Spy by Daniel Silva
  • Midnight’s Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India’s Partition by Nisid Hajari
  • The Great Detective: The Amazing Rise and Immortal Life of Sherlock Holmes by Zach Dundas
  • The Deeper Genome: Why there is more to the human genome than meets the eye by John Parrington
  • Down the Rabbit Hole: Curious Adventures and Cautionary Tales of a Former Playboy Bunny by Holly Madison
  • A Stolen Childhood: A dark past, a terrible secret, a girl without a future by Casey Watson
  • Storm and Steel (The Book of the Black Earth) by Jon Sprunk
  • Anger: Taming a Powerful Emotion by Gary D Chapman
  • Blood Sisters (Katie Maguire) by Graham Masterton
  • Sisters of the Revolution: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology by Ann VanderMeer and Jeff VanderMeer
  • Language Arts by Stephanie Kallos

Well, again…quite the mix!

June 1st also marks the publication of one of my siblings’ first novel:

One Murder More (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Fascinating to watch how it’s doing as we get within ten days! Reviews from “regular readers” (as opposed to well-known authors and such) have started to show up at Amazon. Those will be from people who were part of the crowd sourcing campaign, who got the book pre-release. We were talking about it yesterday, and I mentioned that I don’t think I can fairly review it (given the relationship). Oh, I think I’d do okay at separating myself, but I don’t think it’s appropriate for me to do it. :)

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

May 2015 Kindle book releases

April 24, 2015

May 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances…I’ll have to dig into that effect.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 5,729 (at time of writing) May releases in the USA Kindle store:

May 2015 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Of those, by the way, 991 are in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

about 17%.

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

One interesting thing before I get into some individual titles: the first four (sorted by new and popular) are the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month!

Since Prime members can already be reading one of these (even though they aren’t officially released until April) at no additional cost, you can see how that would drive up their popularity as compared to actual pre-orders. The top four being Kindle First was also true the last time I did one of these.

The other thing is that some of those Kindle Unlimited titles are way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • Rock with Wings (Leaphorn and Chee Mysteries) by Anne Hillerman
  • A Shade of Vampire 13: A Turn of Tides by Bella Forrest (KU)
  • The Crown of Ptolemy (The Heroes of Olympus) by Rick Riordan
  • Born of Defiance (The League: Nemesis Rising Book 7) by Sherrilyn Kenyon
  • Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies, and Three Battles by Bernard Cornwell
  • Lesser Beasts: A Snout-to-Tail History of the Humble Pig by Mark Essig
  • I, Ripper: A Novel by Stephen Hunter
  • Benchwarmer: A Sports-Obsessed Memoir of Fatherhood by Josh Wilker
  • American Wife: A Memoir of Love, War, Faith, and Renewal by Taya Kyle and Jim DeFelice
  • Sesame Street Let’s Cook! by Sesame Workshop
  • Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future by Ashlee Vance
  • Archie 1000 Page Comics BLOW-OUT! (Archie 1000 Page Digests) by Archie Superstars
  • The Fall: A Novel by John Lescroart
  • Seveneves: A Novel by Neal Stephenson
  • The Enemy Inside: A Paul Madriani Novel (Paul Madriani Novels Book 13) by Steve Martini
  • Shigeru Miyamoto: Super Mario Bros., Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda (Influential Video Game Designers)by Jennifer deWinter
  • Broadcast Hysteria: Orson Welles’s War of the Worlds and the Art of Fake News by A. Brad Schwartz
  • What’s Your Story?: True Experiences from Complete Strangers by Brandon Doman
  • The Secret History of Kindness: Learning from How Dogs Learn by Melissa Holbrook Pierson
  • Smart Blonde: The Life of Dolly Parton by Stephen Miller
  • The Rose Hotel: A Memoir of Loss and Renewal From Iran to America by Rahimeh Andalibian
  • Avengers Epic Collection: Behold… The Vision (Epic Collection: Avengers) by Roy Thomas and John Buscema
  • Beach Town by Mary Kay Andrews
  • The Art of Inside Out (The Art of…) by Amy Poehler and Pete Docter
  • The Gates of Janus: Serial Killing and its Analysis by the Moors Murderer Ian Brady by Ian Brady and Colin Wilson
  • Have Gun-Will Travel (TV Milestones Series) by Gaylyn Studlar
  • Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future by Martin Ford
  • Piranha (The Oregon Files) by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
  • The Wright Brothers by David McCullough

Well, again…quite the mix!

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

April 2015 Kindle book releases

March 24, 2015

April 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances…I’ll have to dig into that effect.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 5,727 (at time of writing) April releases in the USA Kindle store:

April 2015 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

One interesting thing before I get into some individual titles: the first four (sorted by new and popular) are the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month!

Since Prime members can already be reading two of these (even though they aren’t officially released until April) at no additional cost, you can see how that would drive up their popularity as compared to actual pre-orders. The top four being Kindle First was also true the last time I did one of these.

The other thing is that there are some

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

titles way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • Never Too Late by Robyn Carr
  • The Dead Play On (Cafferty & Quinn Novels Book 3) by Heather Graham
  • Virtuous (Quantum Trilogy Book 1) by M.S. Force
  • The Clash. Photographs by Bob Gruen
  • The Outlander Series 4-Book Bundle: Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, Drums of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon
  • Make ’em Laugh! American Humorists of the 20th and 21st Centuries by Zeke Jarvis
  • A Shade of Vampire 12: A Shade of Doubt by Bella Forrest (KU)
  • Masculinity and the Paradox of Violence in American Fiction, 1950-75 by Maggie McKinley
  • The Liar by Nora Roberts
  • Companion Piece: Women Celebrate the Aliens, Humans and Tin Dogs of Doctor Who by Nina Allan and Seanan McGuire
  • Perfect Match by Fern Michaels
  • Gathering Prey (The Prey Series Book 26) by John Sandford
  • The Divine Spark: A Graham Hancock Reader: Psychedelics, Consciousness, and the Birth of Civilization by Graham Hancock
  • My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family’s Nazi Past by Jennifer Teege and Nikola Sellmair
  • Baseball Maverick: How Sandy Alderson Revolutionized Baseball and Revived the Mets by Steve Kettmann
  • The MacArthur New Testament Commentary Set of 33 volumes (Macarthur New Testament Commentary Series) by John MacArthur (nearly $500)
  • Prison of Hope (The Hellequin Chronicles) by Steve McHugh (KU)
  • Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen by Mary Norris
  • The Cambridge World History: Volume 1, Introducing World History, to 10,000 BCE by David Christian
  • Woof by Spencer Quinn
  • The Hemingway Log: A Chronology of His Life and Timesby Brewster Chamberlin
  • The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age by Robert Wachter
  • Avengers: The Vibranium Collection by Stan Lee and Roy Thomas

Well, again…quite the mix!

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

March 2015 Kindle book releases

February 24, 2015

March 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it. We have started to return to the Agency Model, but Amazon is allowed to discount in some circumstances…I’ll have to dig into that effect.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 6,122 (at time of writing) February releases in the USA Kindle store:

March 2015 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

One interesting thing before I get into some individual titles: the first four (sorted by new and popular) are the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month!

Since Prime members can already be reading two of these (even though they aren’t officially released until October) at no additional cost, you can see how that would drive up their popularity as compared to actual pre-orders. The top four being Kindle First was also true the last time I did one of these.

The other thing is that there are some Kindle Unlimited titles way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • One Wish by Robyn Carr
  • 7 Brides for 7 Bodies (Body Movers) by Stephanie Bond
  • H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald
  • Claimed (Servants of Fate #2) by Sarah Fine (KU)
  • A Shade of Vampire 11: A Chase of Prey by Bella Forrest (KU)
  • Vengeance of the Iron Dwarf (Forgotten Realms: Companions Codex) by R. A. Salvatore
  • Extinction Edge (The Extinction Cycle Book 2) by Nicholas Sansbury Smith and Aaron Sikes (KU)
  • Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World by Bruce Schneier
  • Fiscal Regimes and the Political Economy of Premodern States by Andrew Monson and Walter Scheidel
  • Teen Legal Rights by David Hudson
  • American Poetry after Modernism: The Power of the Word
    by Albert Gelpi
  • Understanding Global Cultures: Metaphorical Journeys Through 34 Nations, Clusters of Nations, Continents, and…
    by Martin J. Gannon and Rajnandini (Raj) K. Pillai
  • The Flavia de Luce Series 6-Book Bundle by Alan Bradley
  • Teaching with Tablets by Helen Caldwell and James Bird
  • Striking Beauties: Women Apparel Workers in the U.S. South, 1930-2000 by Michelle Haberland
  • The Mossad: Six Landmark Missions of the Israeli Intelligence Agency, 1960-1990 by Marc E. Vargo
  • The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century by Angela E. Stent
  • One Day in the Life of the English Language: A Microcosmic Usage Handbook by Frank L. Cioffi
  • Goldeneye: Where Bond Was Born: Ian Fleming in Jamaica
    by Matthew Parker
  • Cat Out of Hell by Lynne Truss
  • Figures of Fear: An anthology by Graham Masterton
  • Listen, Yankee!: Why Cuba Matters by Tom Hayden
  • The Next Species: The Future of Evolution in the Aftermath of Man by Michael Tennesen
  • Dorothy Must Die: The Other Side of the Rainbow Collection: No Place Like Oz, Dorothy Must Die, The Witch Must…by Danielle Paige
  • There Is Simply Too Much to Think About: Collected Nonfiction by Saul Bellow
  • Werewolf Cop: A Novel by Andrew Klavan
  • Raising Kids Who Read: What Parents and Teachers Can Do by Daniel T. Willingham
  • The Discreet Hero: A Novel by Mario Vargas Llosa and Edith Grossman
  • Around the World in 50 Years: My Adventure to Every Country on Earth by Albert Podell
  • The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth’s Rarest Creatures by William deBuys
  • The Art of War Visualized: The Sun Tzu Classic in Charts and Graphs by Jessica Hagy
  • Archie in the Crosshairs (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries) by Robert Goldsborough
  • Kingdom Keepers New Series I (Kingdom Keepers: The Return) by Ridley Pearson and Disney Digital Books
  • Cranky Ladies of History by Garth Nix and Jane Yolen

Well, that’s a pretty mixed set for you!

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

February 2015 Kindle book releases

January 26, 2015

February 2015 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

However, it’s worth noting that pre-ordering at a low price will tend to preserve that price. Back when the Agency Model was solidly in place, Amazon couldn’t guarantee that books sold by the publishers using that structure wouldn’t go up in price after you pre-ordered them. It wasn’t likely, it was just that Amazon couldn’t control it.

For the most part, we are back to Amazon selling the books…which means they can guarantee the price.

If we see a return of the Agency Model (the rumor is that’s happening with Simon & Schuster), we’ll be back to that non-guarantee situation.

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 4,946 (at time of writing) February releases in the USA Kindle store:

February 2015 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

One interesting thing before I get into some individual titles: the first four (sorted by new and popular) are the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month!

Since Prime members can already be reading one of these (even though they aren’t officially released until October) at no additional cost, you can see how that would drive up their popularity as compared to actual pre-orders. The top four being Kindle First was also true the last time I did one of these.

The other thing is that there are some Kindle Unlimited titles way up on the list. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

  • Deadly in High Heels: High Heels Mysteries #9 Feb 3, 2015 by Gemma Halliday
  • Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances Feb 3, 2015 by Neil Gaiman
  • Waking the Dead (Cafferty & Quinn Novels Book 2) by Heather Graham
  • Desperate Measures Feb 17, 2015 by Fern Michaels
  • Wrongful Death (A Detective Jackson Mystery) Feb 24, 2015 by L.J. Sellers
  • The Fear Cure: Cultivating Courage as Medicine for the Body, Mind, and Soul Feb 24, 2015 by Rankin, M.D., Lissa
  • Dragons at Crumbling Castle: And Other Tales Feb 3, 2015 by Terry Pratchett and Mark Beech
  • I am Haunted: Living Life Through the Dead Feb 10, 2015 by Zak Bagans and Kelly Crigger
  • The Fall Line: How American Ski Racers Conquered a Sport on the Edge Jan 15, 2015 by Nathaniel Vinton
  • Superman: Earth One Vol. 3 Feb 10, 2015 by J. Michael Straczynski and Ardian Sya
  • Time Patrol (Area 51: The Nightstalkers Book 4) Feb 24, 2015 by Bob Mayer
  • DC: The New Frontier Deluxe Edition Feb 17, 2015 by Darwyn Cooke
  • Harry Potter: The Creature Vault: The Creatures and Plants of the Harry Potter Films Feb 24, 2015 by Jody Revenson
  • Dangerous Games: What the Moral Panic over Role-Playing Games Says about Play, Religion, and Imagined World sFeb 12, 2015 by Joseph P. Laycock
  • 1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music Feb 3, 2015 by Andrew Grant Jackson
  • Two Strangers Feb 1, 2015 by Beryl Matthews
  • The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl Feb 10, 2015 by Issa Rae
  • Princess Treasury Feb 10, 2015 by Disney
  • DISNEY’s Darkwing Duck: The Definitively Dangerous Edition Feb 10, 2015 by Aaron Sparrow and James Silvani
  • The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution Feb 3, 2015 by Patrick Cockburn
  • The Mind of the Maker Feb 10, 2015 by Dorothy L. Sayers and Madeleine L’Engle
  • Doctor Who: Human Nature: The History Collection Feb 12, 2015 by Paul Cornell

One more interesting thing: we can filter for books which will be in Kindle Unlimited! I may do a separate listing for those at some point, but here is the link for the 805 titles at time of writing:

Kindle Unlimited books for the USA Kindle Store February 2015 (at AmazonSmile*)

What I do is keep an Amazon wish list for Kindle Unlimited books I may want to read. That makes it easy for me to pick a new one when I want. :) If you do that, you will just need to check to make sure it is still in KU when you go to borrow it…some books will go in and out of that list. Indie publishers, for one thing, can change that.

Enjoy!

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,382 other followers

%d bloggers like this: