Wiki me this, Amazon

August 12, 2016

Wiki me this, Amazon

Amazon devices are deeply integrated with Wikipedia.

It’s an interesting strategy. Amazon has, in the past, been criticized for being a “walled garden”, but I’ve never really felt that they were overly restrictive with their devices accessing other producers’ content.

For example, we’ve always been able to get the Netflix app on Fire tablets, despite Netflix and Amazon’s Prime video being direct competitors.

While users haven’t been able to use the Google Play store, and the NOOK e-books app hasn’t been in the Amazon Appstore compatible for Amazon tablets, we’ve also had a specific software menu choice to allow installation of apps from sources outside of Amazon…not something you commonly see on tablets. I’ve never known for sure if it’s Amazon that excludes Google Play, or Google Play which excludes Amazon tablets from being compatible directly with Google Play.

Wikipedia, though, has been a resource for us on Fire devices and on Kindle EBRs (E-Book Readers) for years.

In fact, there’s clearly been a special relationship. When you couldn’t browse to just any old website you wanted, you could still get Wikipedia entries from look up within an e-book on a Kindle Touch (for example).

I took a look, and I didn’t see anything that says there is an actual deal between the two…does Amazon have a contract with Wikipedia, or do they just smooth the path to them?

It makes some sense that Amazon likes Wikipedia, a user-edited encyclopedia. Amazon has been very much about the crowd…I would guess that Amazon user reviews have a bigger impact on perhaps the majority of e-book titles’ sales than mainstream, traditional media reviews.

If you highlight two words together on a

Kindle Voyage (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

(or other current EBRs  or a Fire device), it will do a Wikipedia lookup.

I think less well known is that you can use Wikipedia with the Echo family of devices. For an

Amazon Echo (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

or

Echo Dot (at AmazonSmile*)

or

Amazon Tap (at AmazonSmile*)

(I use all three regularly), you can say, “Alexa**, Wikipedia Doc Savage” and Alexa will read you the start of the entry. If that’s not enough, Alexa can read more.

I  think this is a good thing.

Yes, Wikipedia can be manipulated for a short time by people with nefarious intent…or given false information unintentionally. However, I find these problems tend to get straightened out quite quickly.

For me, as an optimist and generally someone with a good opinion of humanity🙂 , it is evidence of the majority wanting to do good rather than bad. Imperfect evidence (not everyone edits Wikipedia, of course), but an indicator. When one person does something “bad”, other people on Wikipedia want to fix it and make it right.

I’m not saying that Wikipedia is an equally good source to cite for a paper as, say, an encyclopedia with editors and fact checkers. I do consult it quite often myself. I’ll often try to confirm the information, although that can be difficult…there’s a pretty good chance that a secondary web source has gotten the information from Wikipedia.😉

So, I would say, don’t be afraid to use Wikipedia on your Alexa devices on Fires/Kindles…lots of interesting, crowdsourced information is available to you.

What do you think? How reliable  do you consider Wikipedia to be? Do you use it on Alexa devices/Echoes/Fires? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

** With the Tap, you don’t say, “Alexa”…you “tap” a button to ask a question

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

September is coming: what devices have been around the longest?

August 11, 2016

September is coming: what devices have been around the longest?

Next month,  September, is when Amazon has been doing a big hardware announcement.

There are often surprises, but I thought that taking a look at how long currently available new models have been available might give us a clue about what might be due for a refresh.

Entry level Kindle

All-New Kindle E-reader – Black, 6″ Glare-Free Touchscreen Display, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

This was actually just updated this June (the big addition was Bluetooth audio…which I think is great). That makes it seem unlikely that we’ll get a new entry level Kindle EBR (E-Book Reader) in September…but you never know.😉

Kindle Oasis

This came out in April of this year, and seems soon for a new model…unless they were to do a different size, which seems unlikely. I’m not linking to it because you still can’t buy it without an animal leather cover. Oh, and they could update it with Bluetooth audio.

Kindle Paperwhite

The 3rd

All-New Kindle Paperwhite, 6″ High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

It’s been over a year since this was announced in June of 2015…and a refresh with Bluetooth seems likely to me.

Kindle Voyage

Kindle Voyage (any configuration) (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

came out in 2014…but I feel like it’s been replaced as the top of the line by the Oasis. I have one and I like it, but it feels a bit like the fifth wheel. I think entry level, Paperwhite, and Oasis is a good lineup.

Fire tablets

I’m addressing these a group…and there was an  update in fall of 2015. I expect an update of the Fire line…the least expensive one has been a big hit

Fire, 7″ Display, Wi-Fi, 8 GB – Includes Special Offers, Black (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

I think this is where we’ll see some real innovation. I think the iPad has lost some of its luster…there are a lot of tablets out there still, and the tablet isn’t an exploding market…but I think that benefits Amazon, which is sometimes seen as a utility player for hardware, when they enter existing markets.

Echo family

The

Echo Dot (at AmazonSmile*)

and

Amazon Tap (at AmazonSmile*)

were introduced in March of 2016…and I use both of mine every workday (and the Tap on weekends). Probably too soon to refresh those.

On the other hand, the original

Amazon Echo (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

has never been updated since it rolled out in 2014. It’s due.

Fire TV family

The

Fire TV Stick with Voice Remote (at AmazonSmile*)

Amazon Fire TV (at AmazonSmile*)

2nd generation was released at the end of last year, but I think we’ll see an update…this is a vibrant growing market, and Apple TV has challenged it with its most recent version.

Could we see something brand new? Sure!

My intuition is something new in home automation, connecting to the Alexa voice service. For example, I’d love it if Amazon introduced a widely compatible SmartHub. They could also do “AmazonBasics” for home automation lights, that kind of thing.

Could they do a watch? A Virtual Reality headset? A fitness tracker? Maybe…none of those feel really likely to me. I like the idea of a wearable audio player (for Prime Music, audiobooks, and text-to-speech) with no visual display, but that might just be me.

What do you think? Will we see new hardware announcements from Amazon in September 2016 ? If so, what do you think we’ll see? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Round up #144: Prime Air, read more live longer?

August 9, 2016

Round up #144: Prime Air, read more live longer?

The ILMK Round ups are short pieces which may or may not be expanded later.

Publishing Perspectives: “Sisters in Crime on Diversity: Multiculturalism, They Wrote”

I found this

Publishing Perspective post by Porter Anderson

intriguing.

It’s about a recent report from

Sisters in Crime (SinC)

about diversity within their group of mystery writers.

The whole question of diversity is an interesting one…and one that’s been in the news repeatedly recently.

Do people of similar nature (gender, ethnic background, sexual preference) have similar perspectives? More importantly, do they lack perspectives that people of different (diverse) natures would have?

If someone believes that’s true, than finding out that a group of content creators or “influencers” being less diverse than the general population means that the works produced by that group underrepresent perspectives in society.

This survey (which is available at the SinC website) compared self-reported categorization of the membership with census data (with the exception of LGBT ((Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender…although it is generally used in a more inclusive manner than that, including those who identify as “gender fluid”, or example)) identification, which used another comparison study).

All of the groups were underrepresented by the authors under this methodology except for two.

SinC members (the survey was sent to 3,400 members; SinC is in fifty states) were reported as 93% “White, non-Hispanic”, compared to 62% of the general population…half again as many.

LGBT self-reported at 6%, compared to 3.8%…158% (somewhat higher than the above).

One more, and then I’ll recommend you read the study. I was surprised that people with a disability were underrepresented. I would expect writers with disabilities to be overrepresented…a person can write for a living with limited mobility. I can certainly see how someone who had a change in mobility status would choose to be the writer they perhaps always wanted to be. I’ve walked with a cane for maybe a few years now…it does make doing my day job marginally more difficult. Perhaps being a successful writer nowadays may require a lot of travel, to go to book festivals and such…I know my sibling, author of

One Murder More (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

does travel to those sorts of events frequently.

HDXter, the work horse

When I was a kid, you figured that you bought household appliance and it would last for generations of devices, but human generations.🙂 It was entirely possible that you would get your grandparents’ vacuum cleaner or refrigerator to use.

While the term had been around for a few decades, it was really in the 1950s that “planned obsolescence” became a popular concept. The basic idea is that companies would intentionally design their products so that the consumer would want to replace it, probably with a newer model from the same company.

Car companies have understood that.

Apple’s phone business has arguably depended on it.

It’s funny, but emotionally, when I buy a Kindle  or a Fire tablet, I feel (not think) that I will have and use it for decades.

Oh, I expect to buy new models when they come up, but that is largely to write about them for you, my readers. I’ve certainly bought them because I’ve been curious about a new feature, but I  expect the old ones to still be around and be part of my life (if I don’t give them away).

Regular readers may remember we had a break-in a few years ago and had a bunch of our Kindles/Fires taken:

Eight of our Kindles stolen

However, I have and use daily a Kindle Fire HDX (now discontinued). HDXter (“H-Dexter”) is the Kindle/Fire I use the most…it’s the one that comes to work with me, the one that does text-to-speech in the car. I use a Voyage and a Paperwhite at home as well, but HDXter has served me incredibly well.

It’s been in Amazon’s own Origami cover, and yes, it’s been dropped or fallen a few times.

Updates have affected it, which is nice…I got the new Page Flip version, for example, which is brilliant.

I have one of the current gen Fires, but I like HDXter better at this point:  it fits my needs.

Reading is life

“Serious readers” may feel like we get to live more by reading books, but one of my regular readers and commenters, Lady Galaxy, linked me to this

New York Times article by Bryan Thomas

which reports on a study that says that regular readers literally live longer.

Here’s the key in a short excerpt:

“Compared with those who did not read books, those who read for up to three and a half hours a week were 17 percent less likely to die over 12 years of follow-up, and those who read more than that were 23 percent less likely to die. Book readers lived an average of almost two years longer than those who did not read at all.”

They reportedly controlled for other factors (readers may be disproportionately part of other groups with average longer life expectancy, including women and those of greater financial means, for example).

There may be a number of reasons for that…it may reduce stress, acting as a form of meditation. I think empathetic people tend  to be more emotionally fit, and there have been other studies which suggest that readers tend to be more empathetic.

“Look, up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Amazon!”

While Amazon’s drone delivery program isn’t happening in the USA yet (it will likely happen in other countries first, due to our approval process moving more slowly), Amazon has launched Prime Air…and it’s a cargo jet!

You can see pictures of it in this

GeekWire post by Alan Boyle

Amazon would clearly like to be able to control the delivery process from store to door. They also are using “Amazon Flex” drivers, sort of like Uber for Amazon package deliveries, for those final miles (they recently delivered the hardback version of the new Harry Potter book between midnight and 2:00 AM…creating some speculation, including here, that it might be some other secret product launch…it wasn’t).

I pity folks at package delivery companies who have based their business projections on how much Amazon was going to use them. It’s a tiny percentage at this point, I’m sure, but if Amazon expands control of self-delivery, it could even cause layoffs at those companies, I would guess.

Stock prices of traditional publishers are…

…doing just fine, thank you.

You might guess that publishers are in trouble…I’ve reported on the rise of indies. However, that’s one of the things about being professional companies with a long history: they understand how to make money, even if how they do it isn’t as “sexy” as just selling more copies of books.

This

Publishers Weekly article by Jim Milliot

has a nice look at stock prices, showing that their PWSI (Publishers Weekly Stock Index) has gone up a lot faster than the Dow Jones Industrials.

They break it down by individual companies, and some of the strong players might surprise you…Barnes & Noble (they don’t just include publishers, but B&N has had some “house branded” books before) is up 30.3%…Amazon, by comparison, is up 5.9%. However, it’s a lot easier to rise in percentages when you have a much, much smaller starting number.🙂

What do you think? Are tradpubs gains short term, or can they survive and thrive? Would you rather have Amazon deliver your packages, or UPS/Fed Ex/USPS? Should the author pool reflect the general population? Should reading be part of fitness/longevity plans? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Power out

August 7, 2016

Power out

Someone apparently stole a car and crashed into a power pole near our house last night. So we have been without power for about 10 hours. That obviously means that I won’t be doing as much online I normally do. Hopefully I will be back up soon and have normal operations.

Update: it wasn’t a car, it was a truck:

IMG_0240

Here’s the story, and it will relate to this blog in some ways.🙂

I was in the garage, taking clothes out of the dryer and folding them when I heard a bang and the electricity went out. My Significant Other in the other room heard it, too.

We both thought it was a transformer blowing at first.

This was around 7:00 last night.

My SO does insurance claims for a living (working for a broker…my SO often helps claimants get the money by finding coverage. It’s a “hero” job), and asked me to go outside to see if it was on fire. It was still light at this point.

When I stepped out there, I could see other neighbors coming out on the street…for blocks around.

A neighbor had some sort of police scanner, and said two people had stolen a truck and crashed it into a power pole (and knew the street).

My SO went up there to see if they could help the homeowners with any claim which might happen.

I heard later that there were police, fire, and PG&E (Pacific Gas & Electric) up there already…in fewer than ten minutes, I’d say. The people in the truck had run away, reportedly.

Okay, here’s how this story might help you: what were we going to do without electricity?

It means for us:

  • no lights, power to the refrigerator/freezer, stove, air conditioning (fortunately, it was a relatively cool night…it’s been quite hot lately)
  • no internet
  • no phones. We don’t have a landline, and we only get phone reception through a mini-cell tower AT&T gave us because the service is bad. We can go outside a half block or so and get reception

The bad thing is that a relative got me a back-up power supply (a UPS…uninterruptible power supply) so we wouldn’t lose phones…and I just had never set it up.

The good things…

I have a small Doc Savage worthy tiny hand-crank flashlight next to the bed. You would need Doc Savage’s muscles to use it for much, since you have to crank it a lot to get bright light for long.😉 I was a conga drummer, though, so I can crank it for a while.

Using that, I retrieved a booklight from the library (we have it there for guests)…and got a charged power bank and cord from my laptop case. I keep it charged enough for emergencies: that means we could have used it for our phones the next day and then some. I strongly recommend having one in what we Californians call a “go bag” (for earthquakes and such).

I normally would have been using my now discontinued Kindle Fire HDX, but I switched to reading my

All-New Kindle Paperwhite, 6″ High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers (at AmazonSmile*)

only had about two-thirds of a charge, it could last weeks. My Fire would last a lot less.

It was interesting: we did get decent illumination from our Kindles for other uses.🙂

So, the Paperwhite (or Voyage or Oasis) is great in a power outage.🙂 If you don’t have a power bank, I’d recommend one.

By the way, we could also have charged things in the car,  if necessary. We could also have gone to our offices to charge things.

One other unrelated thing: I’m finally giving up on our Tivo. I think we’ve had it for ten years, and it’s been great. It’s been acting up for some time, not always switching to the right channel in an unpredictable manner.

For the past week, it hasn’t been recognizing that it has a network connector, although it does. That means it was running out of the ability to get program information.

Today, it basically said, “I was about to blow up, so I shut down instead.”😉 Not exactly…but it did say it was overheating.

I’m going to give up on it altogether.

I recabled things a bit, but I’ve got more to go to restore control to everything. The TV ran through the Tivo first, so our

Logitech Harmony Home Control – 8 Devices (White) (at AmazonSmile*))

isn’t set up properly to control our TV…until I fix that, we’ll use the Harmony for controlling our

Amazon Fire TV (at AmazonSmile*)

and the cable box TV for non-Fire TV content.

I was surprised that my SO thought just having the Fire TV would be fine. My SO isn’t super techie, so I thought “regular TV” would be more appealing.

We could cut the cable altogether…but it’s pretty much included with our internet, so  we’ll keep it.

The power came back on after at least ten hours (we were at the dog park when it happened).

One other nice thing: our Ikea refrigerator/freezer apparently has a good seal…we had just shopped for groceries that day, so it was great that everything appears to have stayed frozen for that whole period! We don’t have meat (we are vegetarians) and very little dairy, so we didn’t have to throw much out. We were careful not to open the freezer: keeping the refrigerator/freezer closed during a power outage is important!

An interesting adventure…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Today’s KDD: “$2.99 each, Books by New York Times best-selling authors”

August 6, 2016

“Today’s KDD: $2.99 each, Books by New York Times best-selling authors”

Today’s

Kindle Daily Deal (at AmazonSmile…benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

is interesting in that it isn’t necessarily the books which have been NYT bestsellers (although some have), but the authors.

That could be a chance for you to find something else by someone you’ve already read.

That’s always an interesting proposal. Some authors are pretty inconsistent…they may have been better at the beginning, or gotten better over time. They might be really good at one topic or with one character’s universe, but not so good at others.

There are authors who are “one hit wonders”, who only wrote one really good book…and then either coasted for future books, or dug out incomplete and rejected manuscripts.

It can be a challenge for authors in certain genres. Some publishers want you to have three books in a series before they’ll publish the first one. I do think e-books have contributed to that thinking…readers have such easy access to the next book in the series, and don’t need to carry around physical books, that my guess is that they consume series more quickly than they did in p-books (paper books).

The books in the sale include:

  • Cujo by Stephen King
  • Wolves Eat Dogs (Arkady Renko #5) by Martin Cruz Smith
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • The Secret by Rhonda Byrne
  • The Fifth Gospel by Ian Caldwell
  • Clawback by J.A. Jance
  • The Passenger by Lisa Lutz
  • Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg
  • Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander III
  • Darkness by Karen Robards
  • The Ghost (The Highland Guard #12)
  • Monica McCarty
  • Opening Belle by Maureen Sherry
  • Two If by Sea by sea by Jacquelyn Mitchard

Those are the ones in the today-only sale…as always, check the price before you click or tap that “Buy” button. The prices may not apply in your country, and I’ve seen books go in and out of these sales, but that feels unlikely this time.

While my readers have said (in a recent poll) that they do like to know when mainstream books go on sale, I thought I’d include some other books which are $2.99 each at time of writing…some may be tradpubbed (traditionally published), some not.🙂 Oh, and I’ll mention if they are available through

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Amazon’s subser (subscription service), where they are available at no extra cost to subscribers.

  • Think and Grow Rich: The Original (1937 Edition) by Napoleon Hill
  • An Innocent Client (Joe Dillard Series Book 1) by Scott Pratt
  • Lightning Thief, The (Percy Jackson and the Olympians Book 1) by Rick Riordan
  • Driven (The Driven Series Book 1) by K. Bromberg
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl and Harold S. Kushner
  • Once We Were Brothers (Liam and Catherine #1) by Ronald H. Balson
  • Firefly Beach by Meira Pentermann and Amy Feiman (KU)
  • How the Light Gets In: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel (A Chief Inspector Gamache Mystery Book 9) by Louise Penny
  • The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley
  • Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt and Gregory Maguire
  • Another Monster at the End of This Book (Sesame Street Series) (Big Bird’s Favorites Board Books) by Jon Stone and Michael Smollin
  • Artemis Fowl (#1) by Eoin Colfer
  • Slow Burn: Zero Day, Book 1 by Bobby Adair
  • The Strain (The Strain Trilogy Book 1) by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  • Little Girl Lost: A Lucy Black Thriller (Lucy Black Thrillers Book 1) by Brian McGilloway
  • The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
  • Things Mother Used to Make (188 Quick and Easy Recipes of Vintage Collection) – A Collection of Old Time Recipes…by LYDIA MARIA GURNEY and BestZaa
  • Breaking TWIG by Deborah Epperson (KU)
  • Dead Witch Walking (The Hollows Book 1) by Kim Harrison
  • Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja (#1) by Marcus Emerson and Sal Hunter
  • To Catch a Thief by David Dodge

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

The Olympics are in Brazil…and so is Amazon!

August 5, 2016

The Olympics are in Brazil…and so is Amazon!

Brazil has a rich literary history, and reading is a strong part of its culture.

However, it wasn’t until late 2012 that it got a Kindle store of its own…more than five years after the USA. This

Amazon press release from December 6, 2012

began with this paragraph:

“SEATTLE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Dec. 6, 2012– (NASDAQ:AMZN)—Amazon today launched the Brazil Kindle Store (www.amazon.com.br) with the largest selection of the most popular books, including the most Veja best sellers and lowest prices of any eBookstore in Brazil. The Brazil Kindle Store offers over 1.4 million books, now available to Brazilian customers priced in Brazilian Reais (R$), including more than 13,000 Portuguese-language books, 49 of 60 Veja best sellers—the most of any digital bookstore—and the most free books in Portuguese. In addition, Amazon announced that Kindle—the world’s #1 best-selling e-reader for five years running—will go on sale in Brazil in the coming weeks with a suggested retail price of R$299. For more information, and to begin shopping in the Kindle Store, visit https://www.amazon.com.br/. “

With the opening ceremony for the Olympics on Friday, I thought I’d take a look at the Brazilian site to get a sort of current sense of play.

I don’t speak Portuguese, by the way, but I used to speak some Spanish. I’m guessing I can tell enough to be able to identify navigation and sections, but I’ll use a web translator if I need to do that.

The first thing that struck me is how much it looks like Amazon.com…really pretty similar, which helps with the navigation.

The second thing is that the new version of the Kindle is $299…the same price as when it was introduced more than three years ago. The 1st generation of the Kindle in the USA was $399 and you can get the

All-New Kindle E-reader – Black, 6″ Glare-Free Touchscreen Display, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

for $79.99.

However, that’s not the best comparison. The technology of the Kindle improved considerably from 2007 to 2012 in the USA. The new Kindle in 2012 in the USA was $69.99 (for the ad-supported model)…so it’s been similarly stable, with increase (and some subtractions) in capability and hardware during that period.

In terms of books, that seems very different.

The monetary unit, the real, is roughly three times the US dollar.

The number one seller in the store (not just the Kindle store) is the new Harry Potter play. The list price (what the  publisher says is the “normal” price for the book) is R$99,07. In the USA, the list price is $29.99…so it’s relatively higher in Brazil.. In the USA, the book is discounted to $17.99 in paperbook (p-book) at the time of writing…and in Brazil, the discounted price is R$89,90…relatively much higher than the conversion rate.

The other thing? No Kindle edition in Brazil…and the USA has it for $14.99:

USA Kindle edition of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (at AmazonSmile*)

That might seem odd…that the p-book is in both countries at the same time, and the Kindle edition isn’t. It could be that the publisher of the p-book in Brazil (Arthur A. Levine) doesn’t have the e-book rights for Brazil.

Looking at the Kindle store in Brazil, there are 4,373,482…that compares to the USA at 4,686,432, which is quite close.

Looking at the best sellers (Mais vendidos), it seems similar to the USA, but the top 20 gives me a few different impressions.

  • None of the top 20 are close to $30,00…which would be about $10 USA. I’m guessing they are all independently published. In the USA,  four of the top 20 are over $10
  • All of the top 20 e-books in Brazil are in Kindle Unlimited, Amazon’s subscription service. In the USA, only six of the top twenty are in KU
  • It was interesting to me that a classic, Jack London’s Sea Wolf, is in the top 20..and at R$24,85 is relatively expensive

So, my guess here, and my Brazilian readers may be able to clarify, is that as far as the Kindle store goes, they’ve really embraced the indies (independently published books). They do read some books published outside Brazil…and even English language books can be best sellers.

There’s a little Kindlish background on Brazil as the Olympics’ opening ceremony is almost upon us! This is the strangest Olympics I’ve seen, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be interesting and that I won’t watch.

By the way, I have been to Brazil…and it was the site of my most interesting “traveler’s tale”, but to be clear, this is real. Also, I’ll warn you: it can be disturbing.

We were on a houseboat on a tributary to the Amazon (just as tourists).

More of the local people than was normal weren’t coming back from hunting. There are a lot of risks, so not everybody comes back, but this was unusual.

They had some possibilities: giant catfish (a couple of meters…six feet) were supposedly one possibility.

Well, in addition to the houseboat we had a couple of little boats.

One of them hit some logs…and a body came up.

They could tell by looking at the body, that the killer was a caiman…like a crocodile, sort of. Caimans can’t move their jaws side to side, just up and down. Crocodiles solve that problem with the “death spiral”; grab a limb and spin around to tear it off.

Caimans put you somewhere until you get soft.

They asked us to help look for the caiman.

At night, we went out with other people from the houseboat with flashlights (we were all in boats). We were supposed to be able to tell how big they were (it had to be a big one) by how far apart the red dots were which were their eyes. We were terrible at it…one of my siblings thought they saw a big one…and a crewperson brought it over to us, at about a meter long.🙂

At one point, they told us to go back to the houseboat.

We did.

The next morning, the Captain told us what had happened.

They thought they had the right one (I’ve never known how, and what was going on was quite emotional, so I didn’t interrupt the story and ask).

The captain said something like, “I got in the water and–”

At  that point, we did interrupt!

“Why did you get in the water?”

Captain: “If I am in the boat and I miss it, I don’t know where it will go. If I am in the water and I miss it, it will come after me, and I will get a second shot.”

This was all said quite matter-of-factly.

They cut it open at the site and confirmed there were human body parts in it.

They brought back the head for us to see…it was about a meter/yard by itself.

They told us that from the tip of the tail to the tip of the snout, it was about 5 meters…about sixteen and a half feet.

It was certainly a tragedy…and really shows us how differently people live their lives around the world. That one of the amazing things about reading…it gives us, in some small way, a chance to experience the thoughts and feelings of people from around the world.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Monthly Kindle Deals for $3.99 or less each: August 2016

August 2, 2016

Monthly Kindle Deals for $3.99 or less each: August 2016

Amazon does the Kindle Daily Deal (at AmazonSmile…benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*), which used to discount four books a day (often general fiction, a romance, a science fiction/fantasy book, and a kids’ book). Now, it seems like it is generally more books than that, and not categorized.

They also do Monthly Kindle Book Deals for $3.99 or less each (at AmazonSmile)…which is branded this time as “Kindle Summer Reading Deals”, but still indicate it will change each month. There used to be about 100 of them, but there are many times that now: 680 at the time of writing…126 fewer than last month (which is a lot, and atypical). They are up to 80% off…and in a return to normal, none of them is more than $3.99.

Those prices only apply to the USA, and one weird thing is that sometimes some of the books seem to sell out at that price sometimes (or become unavailable for some other reason).

Another thing is that 380 of them (50 fewer than last month) are available through

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Amazon lists that information prominently…and it’s now commonly a filter in search results. If they are, then you need to consider whether it is worth buying them…even at these low prices. While they are in KU, you can, if you are a subscriber (and there’s a free month available right now), read them at no additional cost. There are, of course, advantages to owning books, especially if you want to re-read them. A book could move out of KU at any time. Even if you think you want to own it, if you are a KU member, you could always read it first to make sure.😉 I will mark them with KU.

By the way, in the new version of the

eReaderIQ advanced search

you can make KU a filter. So, you can search for books by an author, a keyword, an average customer review which you can read as part of your KU membership…nice! I’m not associated with eReaderIQ except as a user (we have had some correspondence), but I do think it is the most valuable website for Kindleers.

I’m going to list some of the books in this sale that caught my eye…I’m not necessarily recommending them, but I do think they are interesting.

The ones I link (if I actually link to specific books) also don’t block text-to-speech access**…but I think blocking it is becoming rarer.

  • From World War to Cold War: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the International History of the 1940s by David Reynolds
  • The Return of the Mountain Man by William W. Johnstone
  • Bowl: Vegetarian Recipes for Ramen, Pho, Bibimbap, Dumplings, and Other One-Dish Meals by Lukas Volger and Michael Harlan Turkell
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl and Harold S. Kushner
  • America: Imagine a World without Her by Dinesh D’Souza
  • The Imposter (The Bishop’s Family Book #1): by Suzanne Woods Fisher (KU)
  • In the Heart of Life: by Kathy Eldon
  • The History of Surfing by Matt Warshaw
  • Smarter Than Squirrels (Down Girl and Sit series Book 1) by Lucy A. Nolan and Mike Reed
  • Dolores Huerta: A Hero to Migrant Workers by Sarah E. Warren and Robert Casilla (KU)
  • Waiting for an Army to Die: The Tragedy of Agent Orange by Fred A. Wilcox
  • The Boy Born Dead: A Story of Friendship, Courage, and Triumph by David Ring and David Wideman
  • Standoff in the Ashes by William W. Johnstone (two Johnstone books…but they’ll be different) (and other books in this series)
  • Pacific Fresh: Great Recipes from the West Coast by Maryana Volstedt
  • The Euro Trap: On Bursting Bubbles, Budgets, and Beliefs by Hans-Werner Sinn
  • Chains of Command (Frontlines Book 4) by Marko Kloos (KU) (I’ll read this one…I’ve read the first three)
  • Once We Were Brothers by Ronald H. Balson
  • Fractured State (Fractured State Series Book 1) by Steven Konkoly (KU)
  • The Possibility Dogs: What I Learned from Second-Chance Rescues About Service, Hope, and Healing by Susannah Charleson
  • Secret Agent 6th Grader (a hilarious mystery for children ages 9-12) by Noah Child and Marcus Emerson
  • Codename: Chandler: Fix (Kindle Worlds Novella) by F. Paul Wilson and J.A. Konrath
  • Fabulous Science: Fact and Fiction in the History of Scientific Discovery by John Waller
  • Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers: The Acclaimed Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Diseases, and Coping – Now Revised by Robert M. Sapolsky
  • Vendetta (The Nikki Boyd Files Book #1) by Lisa Harris
  • Unlocking Potential: 7 Coaching Skills That Transform Individuals, Teams, and Organizations by Michael K. Simpson and Dr. Marshall Goldsmith (KU)
  • Unlocking Potential: 7 Coaching Skills That Transform Individuals, Teams, and OrganizationsAug 12, 2014 | Kindle eBook
    by Michael K. Si
  • Hello Love by Karen McQuestion
  • The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults by Frances E. Jensen and Amy Ellis Nutt
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cold Equations: The Persistence of Memory: Book One by David Mack
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cold Equations: Silent Weapons: Book Two by David Mack
  • Good Old Dog: Expert Advice for Keeping Your Aging Dog Happy, Healthy, and Comfortable by Faculty of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts Univer and Nicholas H. Dodman
  • Cat Cora’s Classics with a Twist: Fresh Takes on Favorite Dishes by Cat Cora
  • The Dog Listener: Learning the Language of your Best Friend by Jan Fennell and Monty Roberts
  • Mary Poppins by P. L. Travers
  • The Prepper’s Pocket Guide: 101 Easy Things You Can Do to Ready Your Home for a Disaster (Preppers) by Bernie Carr and Evan Wondolowski
  • The Last Dragonslayer: The Chronicles of Kazam, Book 1 by Jasper Fforde
  • Wind, Sand and Stars (Harvest Book) by Antoine de Saint-Exupery and Lewis Galantiere

There are some good choices here…maybe not so many really well-known ones, but still, an interesting group.

If there were others you’d like to mention for me and my readers, please comment on this post.

Prime members, don’t forget to pick up your

Kindle First books (at AmazonSmile*)

You can get one of the six (same as last month…previously, it has often been four) books to own (not borrow) for free…these are books which will be actually released next month. The choices this month are:

  • Interference by Amélie Antoine, translated by Maren Baudet-Lackner (psychological suspense)
  • The Things We Wish Were True by Marybeth Mayhew Whalen (contemporary fiction)
  • Tier One (Tier One Series Book 1) by Brian Andrews, Jeffrey Wilson (mystery thriller)
  • Black Rain by Matthew B.J. Delaney (thriller)
  • After Disasters by Viet Dinh (literary fiction)
  • The Shelf Life of Happiness by David Machado, translated by Hillary Locke (modern fiction)

People like to know which one I pick…I went with The Things We Wish Were True. This was a confusing list for  me…what’s the difference between contemporary fiction and modern fiction? Then there is  a thriller, a military thriller, and a psychological suspense book…again, the genre classifications aren’t that clear to me. I assume they may have changed since I managed a brick and mortar bookstore…

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

** A Kindle with text-to-speech can read any text downloaded to it…unless that access is blocked by the publisher inserting code into the file to prevent it. That’s why you can have the device read personal documents to you (I’ve done that). I believe that this sort of access blocking disproportionately disadvantages the disabled, although I also believe it is legal (provided that there is at least one accessible version of each e-book available, however, that one can require a certification of disability). For that reason, I don’t deliberately link to books which block TTS access here (although it may happen accidentally, particularly if the access is blocked after I’ve linked it). I do believe this is a personal decision, and there  are legitimate arguments for purchasing those books. 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Snapshot: August 1, 2016

August 2, 2016

Snapshot: August 1, 2016

Note: thanks to reader feedback, especially from Edward Boyhan, I moved the other data (generally, more than two years old) to a page (Historical Snapshot) rather than a post.

Summary:

Hm. Fewer books added last month were under $10, which is unusual. Even more unusual is a noticeable drop in the number of free books to own. While it isn’t obvious to me where it happened, it does seem to suggest prices have gone up a tad. It may have happened between the price points I measure. The New York Times bestseller hardback fiction equivalents did come down in price, though.

I generally run this information through eReaderIQ.com (it’s just easier than Amazon), and there are some vagaries in the searches (both there and on Amazon). I do try to run it the same way every time, so unless Amazon changes something, it should give you a pretty good idea. NOTE: I’ve changed this explanation from saying “Jungle-Search.com” to “eReaderIQ.com”. It’s the same people and I assume the results are the same. eReaderIQ is just for the Kindle, Jungle-Search does Amazon generally. eReaderIQ has a slightly better interface for the searches.

Titles in Kindle Store

TitlesInStore201608

August 1, 2016: 4,673,290
July 1, 2016: 4,606,532
June 1, 2016: 4,535,673
May 1, 2016: 4,466,976
April 1, 2016: 4,433,082
March 1, 2016: 4,356,852
February 1, 2016: 4,260,301
January 1, 2016: 4,168,071
December 1, 2015: 4,046,825 (note: as I projected, the USA Kindle store broke 4 million titles)
November 1, 2015: 3,961,896
October 1, 2015: 3,875,694
September 1, 2015: 3,799,009
August 1, 2015: 3,714,509
July 1, 2015: 3,636,269
June 1, 2015: 3,530,378
May 1, 2015: 3,457,009
April 1, 2015: 3,378,436
March 1, 2015: 3,288,124
February 1, 2015: 3,178,962
January 1, 2015: 3,104,677
December 1, 2014: 3,027,234
November 1, 2014: 2,958,430
October 1, 2014: 2,888,225
September 1, 2014: 2,801,221
August 1, 2014: 2,724,012
July 1, 2014: 2,655,727
June 1, 2014: 2,596,747 (2,597,112 for second run)
May 1, 2014: 2,576,453
May 16 2009: 284,491

Approximate average of titles added per day:

August 1, 2016: 2,153
July 1, 2016: 2,286
June 1, 2016: 2,216
May 1, 2016: 1,130
April 1, 2016: 2,459
March 1, 2016: 3,329
February 1, 2016: 2,975
January 1, 2016: 3,911
December 1, 2015: 2,831
November 1, 2015: 2,873
October 1, 2015: 2,556
September 1, 2015: 2,726
August 1, 2015: 2,524
July 1, 2015: 3,530
June 1, 2015: 2,446
May 1, 2015: 2,619
April 1, 2015: 3,225
March 1, 2015: 3,899
February 1, 2015: 2,396
January 1, 2015: 2,581
December 1, 2014: 2,293
November 1, 2014: 2,265
October 1, 2014: 2,900
September 1, 2014: 2,491
August 1, 2014: 2,276
July 1, 2014: 1954
June 1, 2014: 655 (2nd run: 689)
May 1, 2014: 2,131

Magazines:

August 1, 2016: 788
July 1, 2016: 758
June 1, 2016: 741
May 1, 2016: 714
April 1, 2016: 711
March 1, 2016: 699
February 1, 2016: 685
January 1, 2016: 684
December 1, 2015: 667
November 1, 2015: 646
October 1, 2015: 632
September 1, 2015: 638
August 1, 2015: 636
July 1, 2015: 632
June 1, 2015: 631
May 1, 2015: 630
April 1, 2015: 643
March 1, 2015: 647
February 1, 2015: 638
January 1, 2015: 638
December 1, 2014: 643
November 1, 2014: 646
October 1, 2014: 652
September 1, 2014: 652
August 1, 2014: 649
July 1, 2014: 650
June 1, 2014: 668
May 1, 2014: 671

Newspapers:

August 1, 2016: 160
July 1, 2016: 166
June 1, 2016: 167
May 1, 2016: 168
April 1, 2016: 168
March 1, 2016: 172
February 1, 2016: 172
January 1, 2016: 169
December 1, 2015: 168
November 1, 2015: 168
October 1, 2015: 168
September 1, 2015: 172
August 1, 2015: 173
July 1, 2015: 173
June 1, 2015: 173
May 1, 2015: 172
April 1, 2015: 173
March 1, 2015: 172
February 1, 2015: 170
January 1, 2015: 175
December 1, 2014: 174
November 1, 2014: 174
October 1, 2014: 174
September 1, 2014: 175
August 1, 2014: 174
July 1, 2014: 175
June 1, 2014: 177
May 1, 2014: 178

Blogs:

August 1, 2016: 15,792 (ILMK rank: #9)
July 1, 2016: 15,746 (ILMK rank: #8)
June 1, 2016: 15,708 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2016: 15,669 (ILMK rank: #14)
April 1, 2016: 15,351 (ILMK rank: I could not find a ranking for bestselling blogs)
March 1, 2016: 15,144 (ILMK rank: #9)
February 1, 2016: 15,156 (ILMK rank: #10)
January 1, 2016: 15,122 (ILMK rank: #8)
December 1, 2015: 15,071 (ILMK rank: #8)
November 1, 2015: 15,030 (ILMK rank: #8)
October 1, 2015: 14,983 (ILMK rank: #8)
September 1, 2015: 14,923 (ILMK rank: #8)
August 1, 2015: 14,883 (ILMK rank: #8)
July 1, 2015: 14,837 (ILMK rank:#8)
June 1, 2015: 14,768 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2015: 14,679 (ILMK rank: #8)
April 1, 2015: 14,648 (ILMK rank: #9)
March 1, 2015: 14,588 (ILMK rank: #8)
February 1, 2015: 14,419 (ILMK rank: #8)
January 1, 2015: 14,392 (ILMK rank: #10)
December 1, 2014: 14,337 (ILMK rank: #14)
November 1, 2014: 14,267
October 1, 2014: 14,189 (ILMK rank: #11)
September 1, 2014: 14,151 (ILMK rank: #12)
August 1, 2014: 14,089 (ILMK rank: #13)
July 1, 2014: 13,985 (ILMK rank: #13)
June 1, 2014: 13,924 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2014: 13,811 (ILMK rank: #10)

Percentage of books priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars

July 2016, (taken August 1, 2016): 85.6% (3,800,960 of 4,441,416)
June, 2016 (taken July 1, 2016): 86.1% (3,747,972 of 4,606,532)
May 2016, (taken June 1, 2016): 85.6% (4,26,357 of 3,678,86)
April, 2016 (taken May 1, 2016): 85.2% (3,598,659 of 4,225,884)
March, 2016 (taken April 1, 2016): 85.4% (3,587,825 of 4,203,311)
February, 2016 (taken March 1, 2016): 85.2% (3,522,742 of 4,133,304)
January, 2016 (taken February 1, 2016): 85.2% (3,440,910 of 4,038,776)
December, 2016 (taken January 1, 2016): 85.0% (3,350,232 of 3,490,070)
November, 2015 (taken December 1, 2015): 84.9% (3,242,119 of 3,818,499)
October, 2015 (taken November 1, 2015): 84.7% (3,166,691 of 3,736,839)
September, 2015 (taken October 1, 2015): 84.8% (3,096,037 of 3,652,166)
August, 2015: (taken September 1, 2015): 85.3% (3,048,620 of 3,575,587)
July, 2015 (taken August 1, 2015): 85.3% (2,969,714 of 3,482,960)
June, 2015 (taken July 1, 2015: 83.9% (2,893,481 of 3,408,090)
May, 2015 (taken June 1, 2015): 84.7% (2,800,318 of 3,306,054)
April, 2015 (taken May 1, 2015): 84.6% (2,736,106 of 3,232,290)
March, 2015 (taken April 1, 2015): 88.4% (2,802,470 of 3,171,379)
February, 2015 (taken March 1, 2015): 88.3% (2,721,649 of 3,083,344)
January, 2015 (taken February 1, 2015): 88.4% (2,630,162 of 2,976,291)
December, 2014 (taken January 1, 2015): 88.3% (2,567,412 of 2,907,638)
November, 2014 (taken December 1, 2014):88.3% (2,506,715 of 2,838,606)
October, 2014 (taken November 1, 2014): 88.4% (2,451,370 of 2,774,474)
September, 2014: (taken October 1, 2014): 88.2% (2,387,727 of 2,707,622)
August, 2014: (taken September 1, 2014): 87.9% (2,304,717 of 2,621,516)
July, 2014 (taken August 1, 2014): 87.7% (2,232,131 of 2,544,623)
June, 2014 (taken July 1, 2014): 87.7% (2,172,079 of 2,477,343)
May, 2014 (taken June 1, 2014): 74.6% (294,759 of 395,137) | Second run (to account for possible Amazon glitching): 87.6% (2,121,022 of 2,422,630)

Percentage of books with a publication date of the previous month priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars

Books for July, 2016: 88.6% (81,803 of 92,207)
Books for June, 2016: 93.2% (82,227 of 88,180)
Books for May, 2016: 93.1% (82,022 of 88,070)
Books for April, 2016: 92.2% (80,910 of 87,717)
Books for March, 2016: 94.% (95,732 of 101,747)
Books for February 2016: 95.4% (112,307 of 117,729)
Books for January, 2016: 94.2% (87,774 of 93,160)
Books for December, 2016: 94.9% (96,092 of 101,225)
Books for November, 2015: 92.6% (79,061 of 85,397)
Books for October, 2015: 92.2% (76,789 of 83,244)
Books for September, 2015: 92.7% (78,419 of 84,314)
Books for August, 2015: 94.2% (83,159 of 88,243)
Books for July, 2015: 94.3% (81,843 of 86,827)
Books for June, 2015: 94.0% (80,396 of 85,535)
Books for May, 2015: 93.5% (74,211 of 79,388)
Books for April, 2015: 93.3% (76,455 of 81,914)
Books for March, 2015: 93.6% (85,581 of 91,471)
Books for February, 2015: 94.7% (74,806 of 78,979)
Books for January, 2015: 94.6% (73,166 of 77,329)
Books for December, 2014: 95.1% (72,247 of 77,048)
Books for November, 2014: 93.2% (72,264 of 77,550)
Books for October, 2014: 94.0% (72,051 of 76,646)
Books for September, 2014: 95.0% (77,730 of 81,864)
Books for August, 2014: 95.8% (72,127 of 75,293)
Books for July, 2014: 95.8% (72,543 of 75,750)
Books for June, 2014: 94.4% (63,104 of 66,856)
Books for May, 2014: 81.4% (3,177 of 3,905) | 2nd run to account for Amazon possibly glitching: 94.7% (65,080 of 68,713)

Books in the Seventy Percent Royalty Range ($2.99 – $9.99)

August 1, 2016: 61.2% (2,860,965 of 4,673,290)
July 1, 2016: 61.3% (2,821,664 of 4,606,532)
June 1, 2016: 61.0% (2,767,757 of 4,535,673)
May 1, 2016: 60.5% (2,704,477 of 4,466,976)
April 1, 2016: 61.1% (2,707,775 of 4,433,082)
March 1, 2016: 60.8% (2,647,699 of 4,356,852)
February 1, 2016: 60.7% (2,587,810 of 4,20,301)
January 1, 2016: 60.2% (2,507,452 of 4,168,071)
December 1, 2015: 60.5% (2,447,446 of 4,046,825)
November 1, 2015: 60.5% (2,398,461 of 3,961,896)
October 1, 2015: 60.3% (2,338,287 of 3,75,694)
September 1, 2015: 60.7% (2,306,295 of 3,799,099)
August 1, 2015: 60.6% (2,251,364 of 3,714,509)
July 1, 2015: 60.4% (2,195,452 of 3,636,269)
June 1, 2015: 60.5% (2,134,639 of 3,530,378)
May 1, 2015: 60.4% (2,088,376 of 3,457,009)
April 1, 2015: 64.1% (2,164,454 of 3,378,436)
March 1, 2015: 64.2% (2,111,025 of 3,288,124)
February 1, 2015: 64.3% (2,043,564 of 3,178,962)
January 1, 2015: 64.2% (1,992,162 of 3,104,677)
December 1, 2014: 64.2% (1,943,782 of 3,027,234)
November 1, 2014: 64.6% (1,909,982 of 2,958,430)
October 1, 2014: 64.3% (1,857,411 of 2,888,225)
September 1, 2014: 63.9% (1,778,889 of 2,801,221)
August 1, 2014: 63.6% (1,731,841 of 2,724,012)
July 1, 2014: 63.4% (1,684,876 of 2,655,727)
June 1, 2014: 8.7% (225,848 of 2,597,747) | second run to account for Amazon possibly glitching 63.4% (1,647,127 of 2,597,112)
May 1, 2014: 63.8% (1,644,029 of 2,576,453)

Books from one penny to $2.98

August 1, 2016: 20.9% (977,901 of 4,673,290)
July 1, 2016: 20.9% (963,039 of 4,606,532)
June 1, 2016: 20.9% (947,387 of 4,535,673)
May 1, 2016: 20.8% (929,532 of 4,466,976)
April 1, 2016: 20.6% (914,517 of 4,433,082)
March 1, 2016: 20.8% (907,912 of 4,356,852)
February 1, 2016: 20.8% (884,290 of 4,260,301)
January 1, 2016: 20.8% (868,268 of 4,168,071)
December 1, 2015: 20.3% (819,885 of 4,046,825)
November 1, 2015: 20.0% (791,777 of 3,961,896)
October 1, 2015: 20.1% (780,371 of 3,875,694)
September 1, 2015: 20.1% (764,280 of 3,799,009)
August 1, 2015: 19.9% (739,684 of 3,714,509)
July 1, 2015: 19.8% (718,584 of 3,636,269)
June 1, 2015: 20.5% (685,609 of 3,350,378)
May 1, 2015: 19.3% (6,671,179 of 3,457,009)
April 1, 2015: 19.5% (657,728 of 3,378,436)
March 1, 2015: 21.3% (699,221 of 3,288,124)
February 1, 2015: 19.0% (603,638 of 3,178,962)
January 1, 2015: 19.1% (591,610 of 3,104,677)
December 1, 2014: 19.1% (579,121 of 3,027,234)
November 1, 2014: 18.8% (556,881 of 2,958,430)
October 1, 2014: 18.9% (545,350 of 2,888,225)
September 1, 2014: 18.9% (529,976 of 2,801,221)
August 1, 2014: 18.9% (513,541 of 2,724,012)
July 1, 2014: 18.8% (499,756 of 2,655,727)
June 1, 2014: 2.7% (70,679 of 2,596,747) | second run to account for Amazon possibly glitching: 18.7% (485,799 of 2,597,112)
May 1, 2014: 18.4% (474,202 of 2,576,453)

Price Point Analysis of New York Times Hardback Fiction Equivalents

August 1, 2016

14.99 9.99 13.99 10.99 14.99 9.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 13.99
14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 11.99 13.99

Average: $13.54 (-0.30) 2 titles under $10

July 1, 2016

14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 14.99
14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 12.99 9.99

Average: $13.84 (+0.45) 1 title under $10

June 1, 2016

14.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 10.99
13.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 12.99 8.99

Average: $13.39 (-0.10) 2 titles under $10

May 1, 2016:

14.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 9.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 12.99
13.99 13.99 12.99 $12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 13.99

Average: $13.49 (+0.01) 1 title under $10

April 1, 2016

14.99 14.99 13.99 9.99 13.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 13.99 14.99
13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 10.99 12.99 14.74 11.99

Average: $13.48 (+0.04) 1 title under $10

March 1, 2016

12.99 13.99 12.99 9.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99
13.99 12.99 13.99 10.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 13.99

Average: $13.44 (+0.17) 1 title under $10

February 1, 2016

12.99 13.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 9.99 12.99 N/A 12.99 12.99
12.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 N/A 12.99 11.99 13.99

Average: $13.27 (-.52) 1 title under $10

January 1, 2016

12.99 13.99 12.99 14.99 14.99 11.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 14.99
9.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 12.99

Average: $13.79 (+.70) 1 title under $10

December 1, 2015

13.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 10.99 12.99
13.99 9.99 11.99 13.99 4.99 14.99 11.99 13.99 14.99 12.99

Average: $13.09 (-.50) 2 titles under $10

November 1, 2015

12.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 11.99 14.99
13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 12.99 13.99 12.99

Average: $13.59 (+.03) 1 title under $10

October 1, 2015

14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 13.99 7.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.99
12.99 9.45 12.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 14.99

Average: $13.56 (+$0.72) 2 titles under $10

September 1, 2015

13.99 7.99 13.99 12.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 8.99
11.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99

Average: $12.84 (+$1.33) 3 titles under $10

August 1, 2015

13.99 6.99 13.99 9.99 14.99 9.99 10.99 8.99 8.99 11.43
9.99 11.99 14.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 10.99 12.99 12.99

Average; $11.51 (-$0.62) 6 titles under $10

July 1, 2015

13.99 6.99 8.99 14.99 10.99 11.99 8.99 9.99 12.99 16.99
11.84 12.99 13.99 11.99 9.99 14.99 14.99 10.99 12.99 10.99

Average: $12.13 (+$0.16) 5 titles under $10

June 1, 2015

6.99 13.99 16.99 9.99 9.99 12.99 10.99 8.99 12.99 12.99
11.43 11.99 12.99 12.99 9.99 12.99 11.84 12.31 14.99 10.99

Average: $11.97 (+$1.69) 5 titles under $10

May 1, 2015

6.99 12.31 8.99 8.99 8.97 8.99 12.99 11.84 10.99 11.84
12.99 6.99 11.84 9.99 12.99 12.99 5.99 9.10 12.99 6.86

Average: $10.28 (-$1.40) 10 titles under $10

April 1, 2015

6.99 12.99 9.99 13.59 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 11.99 10.99
12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 9.99 9.19 11.99

Average: $11.68 (+$0.57) 4 titles under $10

March 1, 2015

8.99 11.99 10.49 10.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 9.99 9.99 11.99
12.99 11.99 9.79 11.99 11.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 5.99 12.99

Average: $11.11 (+$1.34) 7 titles under $10

February 1, 2015

8.99 11.99 9.79 12.99 9.79 9.99 11.99 7.99 9.99 3.99
12.99 11.99 8.99 5.99 3.99 10.99 6.99 10.99 12.99 11.99

Average: $9.77 (+$0.11) 11 titles under $10

January 1, 2015

9.99 7.69 9.99 7.19 10.99 11.99 10.99 3.99 11.99 7.49
10.99 11.89 6.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 10.99 5.99 10.99 10.99

Average: $9.66 (+$0.09) 9 titles under $10

December 1, 2014

10.99 12.74 3.25 9.78 4.99 10.99 12.99 6.99 11.84 10.99
10.99 5.00 9.99 9.78 9.09 10.99 10.99 10.99 6.99 10.99

Average: $9.57 (-$0.65) 9 titles under $10

November 1, 2014

10.99 9.99 11.99 6.50 10.99 10.99 6.99 10.99 10.99 10.99
10.99 6.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 10.99 7.99 9.99

Average: $10.22 (-$0.86) 6 titles under $10

October 1, 2014

10.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 12.99 10.99 11.99 12.74 11.99 9.99
10.99 10.99 8.99 6.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 12.99 7.99 12.99

Average: $11.08 (-$0.43) 4 titles under $10

September 1, 2014

9.99 10.99 13.99 10.99 6.99 13.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 11.99
10.99 14.99 11.84 11.99 9.99 11.84 8.99 11.99 12.74 10.99

Average: $11.51 (+$0.56) 4 titles under $10

August 1, 2014

8.99 8.99 10.99 11.99 11.84 6.99 11.99 10.99 10.99 10.99
10.99 8.52 12.99 14.99 10.99 N/A 12.74 10.99 10.99 9.99

Average: $10.95 (+$0.30) 5 titles under $10

July 1, 2014

11.84 8.99 11.99 11.99 10.99 6.99 11.99 11.84 12.99 10.49
10.99 7.99 11.99 10.99 7.99 11.99 5.99 11.84 12.99 9.99

Average: $10.64 (+$0.22) 6 titles under $10

June 1, 2014

8.99 7.50 8.99 8.99 12.99 10.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 14.44
10.99 10.99 9.99 11.84 10.99 8.99 11.84 10.99 5.99 10.99

Average: $10.42 (-$0.16) 8 titles under $10

May 1, 2014

10.99 11.04 10.99 7.50 8.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 12.99
11.04 5.99 10.99 9.10 12.99 8.55 10.99 13.99 9.99 9.45

Average: $10.58 (-$0.27) 7 titles under $10

Textbooks in the Kindle Store

August 1, 2016: 64,027
July 1, 2016: 63,869
June 1, 2016: 63,301
May 1, 2016: 62,577
April 1, 2016: 61,867
March 1, 2016: 61,532
February 1, 2016: 60,985
January 1, 2016: 59,826
December 1, 2015: 59,953
November 1, 2015: 58,582
October 1, 2015: 58,203
September 1, 2015: 48,650
August 1, 2015: 48,063
July 1, 2015: 47,977
June 1, 2015: 47,388
May 1, 2015: 46,799
April 1, 2015: 46,482
March 1, 2015: 46,145
February 1, 2015: 46,265
January 1, 2015: 45,345
December 1, 2014: 44,787
November 1, 2014: 44,250
October 1, 2014: 43,910
September 1, 2014: 43,385
August 1, 2014: 42,643
July 1, 2014: 42,114
June 1, 2014: 40,810
May 1, 2014: 39,687

Free books (including public domain)

August 1, 2016: 87,789 (-2%)
July 1, 2016: 89,564 (+5%)
June 1, 2016: 85,502 (-0%)
May 1, 2016: 85,895 (+3%)
April 1, 2016: 83,725 (-1%)
March 1, 2016: 84,422 (+2%)
February 1, 2016: 82,583 (-0%)
January 1, 2016: 82,656 (+2%)
December 1, 2015: 81,264 (+1%)
November 1, 2015: 80,629 (+1%)
October 1, 2015: 79,676 (+2%)
September 1, 2015: 77,976 (-1%)
August 1, 2015: 78,922 (+1%)
July 1, 2015: 77,735 (+1%)
June 1, 2015: 76,688 (-1%)
May 1, 2015: 77,248 (+3%)
April 1, 2015: 74,974 (-0%)
March 1, 2015: 75,030 (+2%)
February 1, 2015: 73,489 (+0%)
January 1, 2015: 73,041 (+13%)
December 1, 2014: 64,805
November 1, 2014: 63,897
October 1, 2014: 61,828
September 1, 2014: 61,787
August 1, 2014: 61,381
July 1, 2014: 60,103
June 1, 2014: 59,848
May 1, 2014: 59,957

Free books (without public domain)

August 1, 2016: 43,638 (-5%)
July 1, 2016: 45,814 (+11%)
June 1, 2016: 41,428
May 1, 2016: 41,755
April 1, 2016: 39,760
March 1, 2016: 41,277
February 1, 2016: 38,516 (-0%)
January 1, 2016: 38,550 (+4%)
December 1, 2015: 37,191 (+55%)
November 1, 2015: 23,872 (+2%)
October 1, 2015: 23,307 (+8%)
September 1, 2015: 21,575 (-3%)
August 1, 2015: 22,154 (+3%)
July 1, 2015: 21,572 (+4%)
June 1, 2015: 20,740 (-3%)
May 1, 2015: 21,362 (+9%)
April 1, 2015: 19,508 (+1%)
March 1, 2015: 19,232 (+4%)
February 1, 2015: 18,489 (+3%)
January 1, 2015: 17,983 (+5%)
December 1, 2014: 17,160
November 1, 2014: 16,735
October 1, 2014: 15,099
September 1, 2014: 15,190
August 1, 2014: 14,717
July 1, 2014: 13,300
June 1, 2014: 12,490
May 1, 2014: 13,191

Spanish edition books*

August 1, 2016: 193,784 (+2%)
July 1, 2016: 190,183 (+2%)
June 1, 2016: 186,750 (+2%)
May 1, 2016: 183,132 (+1)
April 1, 2016: 180,538 (+2%)
March 1, 2016: 176,351 (+3%)
February 1, 2016: 172,246 (+5%)
January 1, 2016: 168,253 (+3%)
December 1, 2015: 163,218 (+2%)
November 1, 2015: 160,225 (+3%)
October 1, 2015: 156,158 (+2%)
September 1, 2015: 152,538 (+3%)
August 1, 2015: 148,388 (+4%)
July 1, 2015: 143,665 (+3%)
June 1, 2015: 139,519 (+2%)
May 1, 2015: 137,022 (+3%)
April 1, 2015: 132,496 (+3%)
March 1, 2015: 128,918 (+3%)
February 1, 2015: 125,505 (+2%)
January 1, 2015: 123,171 (+3%)
December 1, 2014: 119,963
November 1, 2014: 116,680
October 1, 2014: 113,491
September 1, 2014: 109,395
August 1, 2014: 101,643
July 1, 2014: 98,048
June 1, 2014: 95,632
May 1, 2014: 92,954

Books in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL)

August 1, 2016: 1,338,554 (29.6%)
July 1, 2016: 1,340,583 (29.1%)
June 1, 2016: 1,298,473 (28.1%)
May 1, 2016: 1,262,989 (28.3%)
April 1, 2016: 1,277,964 (28.8%)
March 1, 2016: 1,250,894
February 1, 2016: 1,199,281 (26%)
January 1, 2016: 1,168,736 (28.0%)
December 1, 2015: 1,132,942 (28.0%)
November 1, 2015: 1,109,339 (28.0%)
October 1, 2015: 1,084,779 (27.9%)
September 1, 2015: 1,057,291 (27.9%)
August 1, 2015: 1,022,270 (27.5%)
July 1, 2015: 995,047 (27.4%)
June 1, 2015: 957,481 (27.1%)
May 1, 2015: 920,564 (26.6%)
April 1, 2015: 890,629 (24.3%)
March 1, 2015: 853,036 (25.9%)
February 1, 2015: 823,258 (25.9%)
January 1, 2015: 794,093 (25.6%)
December 1, 2014: 764,249 (25.2%)
November 1, 2014: 724,218 (25.1%)
October 1, 2014: 710,979 (24.6%)
September 1, 2014: 673,206 (24.0%)
August 1, 2014: 638,545 (23.4%)
July 1, 2014: 604,950 (22.8%)
June 1, 2014: 586,812 (22.6%)
May 1, 2014: 566,893 (22.0%)

Books in Kindle Unlimited

August 1, 2016: 1,361,620
July 1, 2016: 1,340,737 (29.1% of total)
June 1, 2016: 1,311,185
May 1, 2016: 1,282,695 (28.7% of total)
April 1, 2016: 1,295,483 (29.2% of total)
March 1, 2016: 1,268,842 (29.1% of total)
February 1, 2016: 1,217,059 (28.5% of total)
January 1, 2016: 1,189,911 (28.5% of total)
December 1, 2015: 1,156,686 (28.6% of total)
November 1, 2015: 1,133,293 (28.6% of total)
October 1, 2015: 1,108,762 +2%) (28.6% of total)
September 1, 2015: 1,084,510 (+3%) (28.5% of total)
August 1, 2015: 1,050,688 (+3%) (28.3% of total)
July 1, 2015: 1,023,395 (+4%) (28.1% of total)
June 1, 2015: 984,701 (+4%) (27.9% of total)
May 1, 2015: 948,638 (+3%) (27.4% of total)
April 1, 2015: 918,839 (+4%) (27.2% of total)
March 1, 2015: 880,916 (+4%)
February 1, 2015: 850,027 (+4%)
January 1, 2015: 820,865 (+4%)
December 1, 2014: 791,011 (+3%)
November 1, 2014: 765,236 (+4%)
October 1, 2014: 733,167 (+5%)
September 1, 2014: 696,171 (+5%)
August 1, 2014: 661,111 (new measurement)

Books in the Kindle Matchbook program

August 1, 2016: 75,478
July 1, 2016: 75,794 (-0%)
June 1, 2016: 75,937
May 1, 2016: 76,194 (-0%)
April 1, 2016: 76,497 (-1%)
March 1, 2016: 77,175 (-1%)
February 1, 2016: 77,613 (-0%)
January 1, 2016: 77,877 (-0%)
December 1, 2015: 78,148 (-0%)
November 1, 2015: 78,422 (-0%)
October 1, 2015: 78,677 (-0%)
September 1, 2015: 78,940 (-0%)
August 1, 2015: 79,174 (-1%)
July 1, 2015: 79,656 (-0%)
June 1, 2015: 79,917 (-0%)
May 1, 2015: 80,311 (-0%)
April 1, 2015: 80,594 (-1%)
March 1, 2015: 81,045 (-0%)
February 1, 2015: 81,515 (-0%)
January 1, 2015: 82,228 (-1%)
December 1, 2014: 82,643 (+1%)
November 1, 2014: 81,969 (+81%)
October 1, 2014: 45,267 (-39%)
September 1, 2014: 73,820 (+8%)
August 1, 2014: 68,453 (+1%)
July 1, 2014: 67,466 (-1%)
June 1, 2014: 67,787 (-1%)
May 1, 2014: 68,240 (-16%)

Price Point Analysis

April 1, 2010 was “Agency Day”, when the pricing system for some of the largest trade publishers in the US changed. I’ve started tracking price points, to see how that is affecting things. These are not ranges: it’s how many books are at a specific price point.

7/1/2016
Total 4,673,290
Prime 4,441,416
Under $10 3,800,960

Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 564,512 12.08% 0.03%
$1.99 215,983 4.62% 0.03%
$2.99 865,582 18.52% 0.02%
$3.99 357,735 7.65% 0.02%
$4.99 258,868 5.54% 0.02%
$5.99 143,549 3.07% 0.02%
$6.99 86,956 1.86% 0.01%
$7.99 120,791 2.58% -0.03%
$8.99 67,036 1.43% 0.11%
$9.99 340,609 7.29% -0.01%
$10.99 31,839 0.68% -0.01%
$11.99 43,170 0.92% 0.10%
$12.99 28,881 0.62% 0.01%
$13.99 20,411 0.44% 0.03%
$14.99 38,284 0.82% -0.10%
$15.99 13,228 0.28% 0.02%
$16.99 14,674 0.31% -0.01%
$17.99 6,244 0.13% 0.01%
$18.99 7,055 0.15% 0.00%
$19.99 16,322 0.35% 0.02%
$20.99 2,484 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 2,610 0.06% 0.01%
$22.99 4,466 0.10% 0.02%
$23.99 4,107 0.09% 0.00%
$24.99 10,627 0.23% 0.01%


7/1/2016      
Total 4,606,532    
Prime 4,361,423    
Under $10 3,747,972    
       
       
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 555,258 12.05% 0.04%
$1.99 211,667 4.59% 0.02%
$2.99 852,080 18.50% -0.02%
$3.99 351,616 7.63% 0.04%
$4.99 254,338 5.52% -0.02%
$5.99 140,421 3.05% 0.01%
$6.99 85,088 1.85% -0.06%
$7.99 120,451 2.61% 0.10%
$8.99 61,016 1.32% 0.02%
$9.99 336,093 7.30% -0.05%
$10.99 31,772 0.69% -0.04%
$11.99 37,888 0.82% 0.00%
$12.99 28,219 0.61% 0.01%
$13.99 18,732 0.41% 0.00%
$14.99 42,554 0.92% 0.15%
$15.99 12,223 0.27% 0.00%
$16.99 15,085 0.33% 0.02%
$17.99 5,735 0.12% 0.00%
$18.99 6,838 0.15% 0.02%
$19.99 15,340 0.33% -0.03%
$20.99 2,270 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 2,272 0.05% -0.01%
$22.99 3,487 0.08% 0.00%
$23.99 3,984 0.09% 0.00%
$24.99 9,788 0.21% -0.01%

6/1/2016
Total 4,535,673
Prime 4,296,347
Under $10 3,678,896
Price Point Count Percentage
$0.99 544,905 12.01%
$1.99 207,658 4.58%
$2.99 839,809 18.52%
$3.99 344,572 7.60%
$4.99 251,410 5.54%
$5.99 137,958 3.04%
$6.99 86,573 1.91%
$7.99 114,012 2.51%
$8.99 59,121 1.30%
$9.99 333,073 7.34%
$10.99 32,897 0.73%
$11.99 37,424 0.83%
$12.99 27,483 0.61%
$13.99 18,472 0.41%
$14.99 35,286 0.78%
$15.99 12,056 0.27%
$16.99 13,744 0.30%
$17.99 5,738 0.13%
$18.99 5,941 0.13%
$19.99 16,299 0.36%
$20.99 2,239 0.05%
$21.99 2,661 0.06%
$22.99 3,561 0.08%
$23.99 4,103 0.09%
$24.99 9,940 0.22%

Older data were drawn using http://www.jungle-search.com, newer data with http://www.ereaderiq.com (from the same people). There are a number of possible sources of errors (eRi, Amazon, me), but these are probably pretty good.

  • The free books referenced here are from the Kindle store: there are many other sources for free books
  • My search for textbooks definitely has false positives (books that aren’t really textbooks). I search for -domain (to eliminate public domain titles, which would be older books, generally) textbook. That would find a book about textbooks, for example
  • I searched for “Spanish edition” to find Spanish language books. That has some false positives as well
  • I look at price percentages of books in the range of one penny to fifty dollars, to eliminate freebies and limit textbooks
  • The price point analysis is for books at that specific price: it does not represent a range of prices
  • I compared the percentage of price points in the Price Point Analysis when I showed the difference…not the number of books
  • This information is based on what a United States customer sees

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Paperback or e-book: which costs more?

July 31, 2016

Paperback or e-book: which costs more?

I recently wrote about how the AAP (Association of American Publishers) was reporting lower e-book sales, and how I thought that didn’t indicate that people were reading fewer e-books overall:

E-book sales are dropping…off the radar

One of my readers, Wildsubnet, commented that tradpubs (traditional publishers) charging more for Kindle books than for paperbacks might be having an impact.

That’s an analysis I haven’t done in a while, so I thought it was worth a look.🙂

What I did was look at the bestselling paperbacks at Amazon.com, although that really sorts now by “Featured” (that’s likely to get more tradpubs)

Featured paperback books at Amazon.com (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Before I do, though, let me address the situation a bit more.

From very early on, people would bring up (in the Amazon Kindle forums, for example), this idea that e-books should cost less than p-books (paperbooks). They often based it on the idea that it didn’t cost a publisher anything to put out an e-book, and that the natural materials cost was less.

The first one was based on a couple of ideas that didn’t tend to be true. One was that the publisher already had the e-book rights if they had the p-book rights, which was very often not the case. Another was that all it took was scanning the book if they didn’t already have a digital copy…in reality, the formatting is considerable. It also leaves out royalties for the author for the e-book.

The second one assumes that the list price of a book is set primarily to cover the cost of production…specifically, the cost of the “parts”. That’s actually quite a small part of the cost…there are legal costs, marketing, editing, proofreading, cover artist, lay-out, and so on.

When I would go to check, there were usually a few reasons why an e-book might be more than the p-book:

  • It was a case of Amazon discounting the p-book more…the publisher had set the price of the e-book lower, but Amazon had discounted the p-book more deeply
  • The comparison was to a p-book which had not yet been released…it was on pre-order
  • The p-book was used or remaindered

I can eliminate the second two when I look. I’ll also try to pick just from the Big 5 US trade publishers…although smaller publishers could also be included in the AAP survey.

Okay, here are the top ten that fit those parameters:

Rank Paper List Paperback Kindle Diff Comp to List
1  $      16.00  $         9.89  $  11.99  $ (2.10)  $           (4.01)
2  $      16.00  $         9.52  $  11.99  $ (2.47)  $           (4.01)
5  $      15.99  $         9.39  $    8.04  $   1.35  $           (7.95)
6  $      20.00  $       12.00  $  12.99  $ (0.99)  $           (7.01)
7  $      15.99  $       10.53  $  13.99  $ (3.46)  $           (2.00)
8  $        9.95  $         5.81  $    9.95  $ (4.14)  $                  –
9  $      14.99  $         8.99  $    7.99  $   1.00  $           (7.00)
10  $      16.00  $         9.60  $  11.99  $ (2.39)  $           (4.01)
12  $      16.00  $         9.40  $    9.99  $ (0.59)  $           (6.01)
13  $      16.99  $       10.19  $  11.99  $ (1.80)  $           (5.00)

“Diff” compares the Kindle price to the paperback price…a negative number (in parentheses) means that the Kindle book costs more…which is the case in 8 out of 10 here. There are negative savings. In the last column, a bigger number means more  savings with the Kindle  book compared to the print list  price. Every Kindle book is lower than the print list price.

Is this the same situation it was in the past? Is it because Amazon can freely discount p-books, but not e-books?

Generally, Amazon’s agreements with the biggest publishers are, reportedly, a modified version of the Agency Model. What that means is that Amazon has a limited ability to discount the books.

It still shows that the e-book price is “set by the publisher”, at least when I checked. We no longer see a digital price list.

My guess is that the publishers are setting the price of the e-books relatively high, but not higher than the list price for paper.

Wildsubnet’s comment got me thinking about something else.

I would not buy a p-book instead of an e-book, for me to read, if  it was just a few dollars different. It is simply so much easier for me to read an e-book…I’d skip the book, in most cases.

That’s me, though…let me ask you:

If you don’t see an answer there that works for you, feel free to let me and my readers know what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Amazon’s Q2 financials: even better than Q1!

July 29, 2016

Amazon’s Q2 financials: even better than Q1!

Last quarter, I was blown away by Amazon’s 28% sales growth.

This quarter, as reported in this

press release

and in this

recorded webcast

the second quarter was even better, with a 31% increase over the same quarter in 2015!

This is starting to remind me of the movie The Blob…it just keeps growing and growing.😉

That 31% number, though, is not the most astounding one in the information given.

How about this?

“Net income was $857 million in the second quarter, or $1.78 per diluted share, compared with $92 million, or $0.19 per diluted share, in second quarter 2015. “

That’s more than nine times as high!

I’m going to give you one more small excerpt:

“The second annual Prime Day was the biggest day ever for Amazon, and was also a record day for Amazon devices globally. Compared to Prime Day 2015, worldwide orders grew by more than 60%, orders from third-party sellers with Prime Day deals nearly tripled, and Prime members saved over twice as much on deals.”

They list all sorts of accomplishments, including the introduction of the new

All-New Kindle E-reader – Black, 6″ Glare-Free Touchscreen Display, Wi-Fi – Includes Special Offers (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

which has Bluetooth audio connection capability.

Even though that was mentioned, AWS (Amazon Web Services) was the star.

Clearly, another important piece was international expansion, especially in India.

That’s one reason why there is still a lot of room to grow.

It appears that what I call Phase 2 is working.😉

Looking good!

Seeking Alpha transcript of the call, including the Q&A section

By this time tomorrow, we’ll know what the “secret product” which I wrote about here:

Geekwire: Amazon secret product launch this Sunday (7/31) at midnight

is.

I think there is a chance that it is the hardback of

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – Parts I & II (Special Rehearsal Edition): The Official Script Book of the Original West End Production (at AmazonSmile*))

although I would have thought they would have really promoted that they could get that to people between midnight and  2:00 AM…so that hardback purchasers could have it as soon as Kindle purchasers.

However, the actual release date is Sunday…I don’t think they are going to be able to break the presumed embargo. There would have to be a special deal, and I just don’t think that’s the case.

I’m pleased that it will be getting more people to read plays…I’ve enjoyed many plays in book form.

While I definitely want to read it, at $14.99, I’ll give a family member the opportunity to give it to me as a gift.😉

On the other hand, it may be something much more innovative. It appears that Len Edgerly is perhaps interviewing Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos for Friday’s

The Kindle Chronicles podcast

That will be the 8th anniversary show, and Len said that it was off to Seattle for hopefully the same guest as was on the 4h anniversary show…and the July 26th, 2012 episode had Jeff Bezos as a guest…

http://www.thekindlechronicles.com/2012/07/

Interesting times indeed!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project! Do you have what it takes to be a Timeblazer?

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.


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