Who should be able to make a living as an author?

February 8, 2017

Who should be able to make a living as an author?

No question, the publishing game/industry/market has changed remarkably in the past ten years. The Kindle was first released November 19, 2007. That really shook up manufacturing and distribution, and that was giant.

Prior to e-books, manufacturing a book was a very expensive proposition. I’m a former brick-and-mortar bookstore manager…the demand for a book is very inconsistent and hard to predict. I might need twenty copies of a book one week, and then none for three months…and then ten again. For me to sell hardbacks in a store, you had to be able to produce them very quickly and get them to me.

That’s one of the main reasons we couldn’t take a book “on contingency” (paying nothing for it unless it sold). When the rare author would walk in with a self-published book and want me to put a couple in the window, I’d always ask: “If I need ten of these three days from now, could you get them for me?” The answer was always “no” back then…they had paid to have a certain number printed, and that’s pretty much all they had.

The other thing big publishers could do was buy back books if we overstocked…they would guarantee us we could sell copies we bought, or they’d give us a refund (or more often, future purchase credit). I remember l overestimated the demand for a local celebrity’s book when that celebrity was going to be on a talk show. We overbought by…oh, at least ten, and that’s a lot for a hardback. The publisher took them back and gave us credit.

The rise of e-books eliminates the need for book factories. It eliminates the stock issue.

Naturally, with that big a change, the value of authors is going to be judged differently. What it takes to sell a book changes, with a change in the sales cycle and even in merchandising costs.

It would be a great surprise if everybody who had been able to make a living as an author under the old system could make a living as an author under the new system.

That’s exactly the sort of anecdote told in this

The Guardian article by Danuta Kean

It talks about

Donal Ryan (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

a successful author who has gone back to the day job to make ends meet.

Now, that happens a lot, and for various reasons.

It’s the rare author who sells even a thousand copies of one book: to be able to continue to sell enough copies to make a living, and to do it on multiple titles, is a very remote possibility.

The article postulates that it is because of celebrities writing (or having ghostwitten) books, sucking up all the “advances”. An advance is money that a publisher pays the author prior to publication. The author then hypothetically pays back the advance through royalties…if an advance is $10,000, the first $10,000 of royalties generated from sales of the book goes to the publisher, not the author.

What happens if the book doesn’t sell enough to generate the $10,000 loan?

Well, one would think the author would have to pay it back…and while that’s rare, that has happened.

Now, I do understand why publishers might publish a higher percentage of books from non-author celebrities (movie stars, YouTubers, chefs, and so on). They are lower risk: there is an audience there already. As the market is becoming more competitive, tradpubs (traditional publishers) may become more risk adverse.

However, lest we think this is a problem for authors, I would bet that there are many more people making a living as authors than there were ten years ago…I would think hundreds more just in the USA.

How?

Independently publishing, often doing it themselves through Amazon’s publishing platforms.

Even though I have a full-time job, I have made enough money in a year as an author that if that was all the money I was making, I wouldn’t have been below the poverty level. ūüôā That was a few years back, though.

Back in 2011, I wrote about John Locke becoming the first independently-published Kindle Direct Publishing to sell a million “copies” (licenses) through Amazon:

John Locke becomes the first KDP author in the Kindle Million Club

While I don’t have the evidence, I’d be very surprised if many more people aren’t making their livings as authors than was the case before the release of the Kindle.

So, while it’s certainly possible that some people who were professional authors before e-books have to find other means of making money now, I think others will be able to quit their day jobs. ūüôā

This affects very few people, of course…there aren’t a lot of professional authors of books.

Still, it’s interesting. Some authors will supplement their royalties with other revenue streams…when a book gets licensed for movies or TV, for example, or making personal appearances, or blogging with advertising or subscription fees. Others will simply have to find other work…

What do you think? What other changes will come for authors in the future? Will the tradpublishing route will make sense for anyone? What’s different for a brand name author versus a mid-level or beginning author? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Valentine’s Day sale on Amazon devices: $20 off most EBRs, Fire tablets from $39.99

February 5, 2017

Valentine’s Day sale on Amazon devices: $20 off most EBRs, Fire tablets from $39.99

So nice to have a wide-ranging sale on both Kindle EBRs (E-Book Readers) and Fire tablets!

This sale will not last!

Valentine’s Day sale (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

The only current EBR not on sale right now (in the USA at Amazon.com) is the Oasis…even the least expensive model is $20 off, making it $59.99.

The sale also brings the Paperwhite, a model I particularly like, under $100. If your favorite model is the Voyage, it’s also $20 off.

The least expensive Fire tablet has a 4.2 out of 5 star rating with over 100,000 (!) customer reviews…and is (during the sale) $39.99.

At this time, the sale is not being extended to the Fire TV or Echo family.

If you want to get another EBR or tablet, this is a good opportunity. I wouldn’t expect to see another like this until at least Mothers’ Day…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Atlanta vs. Boston: the super books

February 5, 2017

Atlanta vs. Boston: the super books

For the second year, we are taking the cities of the two teams involved in the Superbowl, and looking at them from a literary point of view.

As happened with Carolina last year, we need to acknowledge that one of the teams isn’t tied to a single city…although they did used to be the “Boston Patriots” before they were “New England”. With apologies to the other cities (including Foxborough, where the team plays its home games), we are going to look at Boston as the Patriots’ city. That makes our two cities Boston, Massachusetts and Atlanta, Georgia.

There’s no question that Boston is a literary titan. We’ll be seeing several superstars take the field, and its also a popular setting for fiction. The latter may be true in part because it is so recognizable: all it takes is a character saying that something is “wicked good”, and we know that’s Boston talk.

However, Atlanta does have an MVP (Most Valuable Paperback) which became a movie which may still have the most attendances of all time (well, to date, anyway).

Let’s start out with Boston:

Entering the field first is a pioneer of short stories, mysteries, and more but best-known for tales of the macabre. Poetry, prose, and adaptations from Roger Corman and Vincent Price¬†to John Cusack, it’s Edgar Allan Poe (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*).

Joining Poe is another poet/prose double-threat with a posthumous Pulitzer Prize: The Bell Jar author Sylvia Plath.

Moving up to the modern day, author Dennis Lehane has been adapted into well-known movies directed by some of Hollywood’s best: Mystic River (Clint Eastwood), Gone, Baby, Gone (Ben Affleck), and Shutter Island (Martin Scorcese).

Not particularly known as a team player, the always self-reliant Ralph Waldo Emerson has taken the field for Boston.

The Fearsome Four will no doubt strike fear into the Atlanta team.

And here comes the first Atlanta author now!

No trace of that fear as the Prince of Pages confidently strides into position…what discipline! It’s the Great

Pat Conroy (at AmazonSmile*)

John Ciardi and Gelett Burgess have joined their Boston teammates…but something is happening at the Southern end of the field. There’s a buzz rising through the crowd. Smoke has come out of the tunnel, but in these weather conditions, it should clear quickly. The crowd is on their feet now! Clearly, this is a beloved author! People are holding up signs…”50x”, “100x”, representing the number of times they’ve read this author’s most famous work. The sun glints off a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. The Boston team straightens their shoulders and some shade their eyes…they are clearing preparing for a challenge.

It’s…

Margaret Mitchell!

Four little words of one syllable each are all that need to be said: “Gone with the Wind”.

This promises to be quite a contest! While there is no denying the Sherman tank which is GwtW, Poe/Emerson/Lehane/Plath inspire an incredible amount of passion for the North. Looking at Mitchell, though, that smirk¬†has one obvious message for the Bostonians…the South doesn’t give a…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Amazon’s Q4 financials: stock drops 3% on disappointment (but sales up 22%)

February 4, 2017

Amazon’s Q4 financials: stock drops 3% on disappointment (but sales up 22%)

Amazon just announced their fourth quarter financials. As usual, they did a public webcast:

They also did a

Press Release

which covers a lot of the numbers.

The reaction in the media, and by investors, was negative…the stock dropped about 3% in a day, as you can see in this

CNN Money graph

That’s not an atypical reaction to an Amazon financials announcement…negative stories, (temporary) stock drop.

I’m sometimes baffled by that. In this case, net sales went up 22%…something you might expect in a new and rising entry into a market, not the dominant force.

However, in this case, I can see the concern.

Let me say right off: that’s not a long term concern of mine. Amazon’s in no trouble, and I expect we’ll see continued sales growth this year.

It’s more that Amazon didn’t meet expectations…which weren’t, I would say, unreasonable.

I also thought this was a great point in this

recode post by Jason Del Rey

Del Rey confirmed with Amazon that there had been tens of millions of new

Amazon Prime (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

members, which is a good thing.

However, Del Rey also sagely notes…Amazon didn’t talk about the rate of Prime member growth.

That is a big deal.

These sorts of calls and releases are carefully crafted, and it’s reasonable to say that leaving out a citation of the growth (which they have made in the past) is deliberate…and therefore, it wasn’t something to tout.

While Amazon is only partially a retail company now (things like AWS, Amazon Web Service, are really significant segments), Prime is key.

As a Prime member myself, this actually encourages me…it means Amazon may work harder to make Prime attractive (and they already do a lot: for one thing, they added¬†Prime Reading (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) which is a rotating group of something like a thousand books Prime members can read at no additional cost).

I do, though, find Amazon’s expenditures, while they hurt the bottom line this time, reasonable. A starring character in the information was Alexa (Amazon’s digital assistant), and Amazon is definitely spending on that.

That’s very forward looking, and may make a giant difference going forward.

I’ve said before that Amazon wants to be the “infrastructure of the internet”, and this is part of that. If Alexa is the way you get to, well, everything, Amazon can charge the providers of those goods and services (not the customer) for access to you. That’s why I say that Amazon’s most important product is happy customers…that’s what they can “sell” to other businesses. That’s not by selling your information, it’s by selling that access, which you may specifically want. If you download an app for a company, you’ve chosen to give that access.

Complaining about Amazon spending on Alexa would be like investors saying, “Mr. Ford, we don’t like the amount of money you are spending on this assembly line thing.” ūüėČ The development of that clearly had an expense, but it would have been shortsighted, to say the least.

I expect Amazon to reveal a big Virtual/Augmented Reality initiative this year, and that’s going to cost. Amazon is spending on video content, both licensing it and developing their own. Those are being critically recognized: Amazon is the first streaming service with a Best Picture nominee (Manchester by the Sea), and the TV side does well also (I’ll be surprised if Christina Ricci isn’t nominated for Z: The Beginning of Everything, playing Zelda Fitzgerald…where author F. Scott Fitzgerald is also a major character). They are hiring something like 100,000 people, and opening brick-and-mortar stores.

I don’t think we’ll ever get to a point where Amazon is just coasting on previous successes…and we don’t want that. ūüôā Being an Amazon investor is never going to be a feel good experience; being an Amazon customer is. ūüėČ

Have a reaction to the news, or predictions for Amazon in the future? Want to give Jeff Bezos advice? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Monthly Kindle Deals for $3.99 or less each: February 2017

February 3, 2017

Monthly Kindle Deals for $3.99 or less each: February 2017

Amazon does the¬†Kindle Daily Deal¬†(at AmazonSmile‚Ķbenefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*), which used to discount four books a day (often general fiction, a romance, a science fiction/fantasy book, and a kids‚Äô book). Now, it seems like it is generally more books than that, and not categorized…although they have been doing themes this year as well.

They also¬†do¬†Monthly Kindle Book Deals for $3.99 or less each¬†(at AmazonSmile). There used to be about 100 of them, but there are many times that now: 591¬†at the time of writing…exactly 200 fewer than last month. That’s actually not an unreasonable adjustment…we are now out of the holiday/returns period.¬†Six of them are $4.99, so that would really make it 585 books that are $3.99 or less, but that’s okay. ūüôā To be clear, Amazon doesn’t say they are $3.99 or less…just that they are up to 80% off.

Those prices only apply to the USA, and one weird thing is that sometimes some of the books seem to sell out at that price (or become unavailable for some other reason).

Another thing is that 148 of them (a whopping 350 fewer than last month) are available through

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

Amazon lists that information prominently…and it’s now commonly a filter in search results. If they are, then you need to consider whether it is worth buying them…even at these low prices. While they are in KU, you can, if you are a subscriber (and there’s a free month available right now), read them at no additional cost. There are, of course, advantages to owning books, especially if you want to re-read them. A book could move out of KU at any time. Even if you think you want to own it, if you are a KU member, you could always read it first to make sure. ūüėČ I will mark them with KU.

By the way, in the new version of the

eReaderIQ advanced search

you can make KU a filter. So, you can search for books by an author, a keyword, an average customer review which you can read as part of your KU membership…nice! I’m not associated with eReaderIQ except as a user (we have had some correspondence), but I do think it is the most valuable website for Kindleers.

This is the third month for my measurement of  which ones are

Prime Reading (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

eligible, which is¬†Amazon’s new benefit for Prime members, a rotating list of books you can borrow each month.

This month there are only fifteen, 88 fewer than last month.

I’m going to list some of the books in this sale that caught my eye…I’m not necessarily recommending them, but I do think they are interesting.

The ones I link (if I actually link to specific books) also don’t block text-to-speech access**…but I think blocking it is becoming rarer.

Okay, books!

  • Jonathan Strange and Mr NorrellJun 5, 2010¬†|¬†Kindle eBook
    by Susanna Clarke
  • The Plot to Hack America: How Putin‚Äôs Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election by Malcolm Nance
  • A Fatal Grace: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel (A Chief Inspector Gamache Mystery Book 2) by Louise Penny
  • In Good Faith (Joe Dillard Series Book 2) by Scott Pratt (and books 3 and 4…but not #1, from what I saw) (also available through Kindle Unlimited…KU)
  • A Spell Of Trouble (Silver Hollow Paranormal Cozy Mystery Series Book 1) by Leighann Dobbs and Traci Douglass (KU)
  • Rebel Fleet (Rebel Fleet Series Book 1) by B. V. Larson (KU)
  • Kindred by Octavia Butler | 4.5 stars out of 5, 949 customer reviews
  • Good Behavior by Blake Crouch
  • The Lyra Novels: Shadow Magic, Daughter of Witches, The Harp of Imach Thyssel, Caught in Crystal, and The Raven Ring by Patricia C. Wrede | $3.99 for 5 books by a well-known author (in an omnibus)!
  • Turbulent Intentions (Billionaire Aviators Book 1) by Melody Anne (KU)
  • Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari
  • The Short Drop (The Gibson Vaughn Series) by Matthew FitzSimmons | 4.5 stars | 7,222 customer reviews
  • One Tuesday Morning / Beyond Tuesday Morning Compilation Limited Edition (9/11 Series) by Karen Kingsbury (Author)
  • Even Dogs in the Wild (Inspector Rebus Series Book 20) by Ian Rankin
  • Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain
  • Perfect Match by Fern Michaels
  • Run by Blake Crouch
  • Retrain Your Brain: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in 7 Weeks: A Workbook for Managing Depression and Anxietyby Seth J. Gillihan PhD (KU)
  • Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World’s Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin Mitnick and Steve Wozniak
  • Phantom Evil: Book 1 in Krewe of Hunters series by Heather Graham
  • A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism…by Joseph Loconte

Remember that you can buy them now as gifts and delay the delivery for the appropriate gift-giving occasion, or print them out and wrap them for whenever you want.

It makes a lot of sense to have so many series starters, but I should also mention that there may be other books in the series in the group…I didn’t list two book in the same series.

If there were others you’d like to mention for me and my readers, please comment on this post.

Prime members, don’t forget to pick up your

Kindle First books (at AmazonSmile*)

You can get one of the six (same as last month)¬†books to own (not borrow) for free‚Ķthese are books which will be actually released next month. This line was at the bottom of the listings this time (I changed the link): “Please note: Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)¬†subscribers can borrow these Kindle First books when they are officially released on February 1, 2017″. The choices this month are:

  • In Farleigh Field: A Novel of World War II by Rhys Bowen (Historical Fiction)
  • Extracted (Extracted Trilogy Book 1) by RR Haywood (Science Fiction)
  • Duck and Hippo in the Rainstorm (Duck and Hippo Series Book 1)
    by Jonathan London, Andrew Joyner
  • Signature Wounds by Kirk Russell (Thriller)
  • The Marvelous Misadventures of Ingrid Winter by JS Drangsholt, Tara F. Chace (Contemporary Fiction)
  • Only the Truth by Adam Croft (Suspense)

People like to know which one I pick…for some reason none of them really grabbed me, but I went with Extracted.

Enjoy!

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

*¬†I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you‚Äôll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)‚Ķand the good feeling you‚Äôll get.¬†:)¬†Shop ‚Äôtil you help!¬†:)¬†By the way, it‚Äôs been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to ‚Äústart at AmazonSmile‚ÄĚ if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

** A Kindle with text-to-speech can read any text downloaded to it…unless that access is blocked by the publisher inserting code into the file to prevent it. That’s why you can have the device read personal documents to you (I’ve done that). I believe that this sort of access blocking disproportionately disadvantages the disabled, although I also believe it is legal (provided that there is at least one accessible version of each e-book available, however, that one can require a certification of disability). For that reason, I don’t deliberately link to books which block TTS access here (although it may happen accidentally, particularly if the access is blocked after I’ve linked it). I do believe this is a personal decision, and there  are legitimate arguments for purchasing those books. 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Answers to the titles/band names which came from books quiz

February 2, 2017

Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz

I recently posted a quiz:

Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz

If you want to try it yourself, go there first; I’m about to post the answers!

Each of these are quotations where I knew the source before I knew the work which used it…

  1. Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
    1. Source: Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  2. Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger
    1. Source: The Tyger by William Blake (AKA Tiger, Tiger…”burning bright”)
  3. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    1. Source: The Tempest by William Shakespeare (I could probably have done an entire game based on “Billy the Bard” allusions) ūüėČ
  4. Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein
    1. Source: The Bible, specifically Exodus
  5. The Dogs of War by Frederick Forsyth
    1. Source: Julius Caesar, again by Shakespeare
  6. The Doors (the name of the band…and the origin of the name of the book on which the band name was based)
    1. Source: It’s a shortening of “The Doors of Perception” by Aldous Huxley…which is, in itself, quoting William Blake’s (Blake, again) The Marriage of Heaven and H*ll
  7. The band Steppenwolf
    1. Source: (Der) Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse
  8. The band Veruca Salt
    1. Source: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (Veruca is the spoiled one who wants it now)
  9. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
    1. Source: The Odyssey by Homer
  10. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
    1. Source:¬†Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Meditation XVII by John Donne. The poem also includes the line “No man is an island”

There you go! How many did you know? If I posted a comment where you guessed and you would like my e-book of quotations (and you are in a country which can get a gift from the USA Kindle store), just let me know. If you already have the book, you can let Amazon know and they’ll give you store credit instead…

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Snapshot: February 1, 2017

February 2, 2017

Snapshot: February 1, 2017

Note: thanks to reader feedback, especially from Edward Boyhan, I moved the older data (generally, more than two years old) to a page (Historical Snapshot) rather than a post.

Summary:

The USA Kindle store is now over 5 million titles, which is pretty amazing. Strangely, magazines jumped up by over 350…that’s unusual. The price of New York Times bestseller hardback fiction equivalents continues to climb…not only did it go up over last month, it’s now up well over a dollar in the past year (comparing February 1st 2016 to February 1st 2017). It was also odd: Amazon only listed 15 this time, when it has been 20 before. There were fewer free books to own, but more to borrow…except in Prime Reading, which went back to about 1000 after jumping up to about 1500 last month. Overall, my sense is prices may have gone up slightly.

I generally run this information through eReaderIQ.com (it‚Äôs just easier than Amazon), and there are some vagaries in the searches (both there and on Amazon). I do try to run it the same way every time, so unless Amazon changes something, it should give you a pretty good idea. NOTE: I’ve changed this explanation from saying “Jungle-Search.com” to “eReaderIQ.com”. It’s the same people and I assume the results are the same. eReaderIQ is just for the Kindle, Jungle-Search does Amazon generally. eReaderIQ has a slightly better interface for the searches. This has also changed back to it being run through Jungle-Search, although I get to it through eReaderIQ.

Titles in Kindle Store

Blue line graph showing fairly steady growth

February 1, 2017: 5,030,914
January 1, 2017: 4,972,110
December 1, 2016: 4,908,904
November 1, 2016: 4,861,264
October 1, 2016: 4,790,218
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed their search results): Update 4,742,587
August 1, 2016: 4,673,290
July 1, 2016: 4,606,532
June 1, 2016: 4,535,673
May 1, 2016: 4,466,976
April 1, 2016: 4,433,082
March 1, 2016: 4,356,852
February 1, 2016: 4,260,301
January 1, 2016: 4,168,071
December 1, 2015: 4,046,825 (note: as I projected, the USA Kindle store broke 4 million titles)
November 1, 2015: 3,961,896
October 1, 2015: 3,875,694
September 1, 2015: 3,799,009
August 1, 2015: 3,714,509
July 1, 2015: 3,636,269
June 1, 2015: 3,530,378
May 1, 2015: 3,457,009
April 1, 2015: 3,378,436
March 1, 2015: 3,288,124
February 1, 2015: 3,178,962
January 1, 2015: 3,104,677
December 1, 2014: 3,027,234
November 1, 2014: 2,958,430
October 1, 2014: 2,888,225
September 1, 2014: 2,801,221
August 1, 2014: 2,724,012
July 1, 2014: 2,655,727
June 1, 2014: 2,596,747 (2,597,112 for second run)
May 1, 2014: 2,576,453
May 16 2009: 284,491

Approximate average of titles added per day:

February 1, 2017: 1,897
January 1, 2017: 2,039
December 1, 2016: 1,537
November 1, 2016: 2,292
October 1, 2016: 1,536
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed their search results) Update: 2,235
August 1, 2016: 2,153
July 1, 2016: 2,286
June 1, 2016: 2,216
May 1, 2016: 1,130
April 1, 2016: 2,459
March 1, 2016: 3,329
February 1, 2016: 2,975
January 1, 2016: 3,911
December 1, 2015: 2,831
November 1, 2015: 2,873
October 1, 2015: 2,556
September 1, 2015: 2,726
August 1, 2015: 2,524
July 1, 2015: 3,530
June 1, 2015: 2,446
May 1, 2015: 2,619
April 1, 2015: 3,225
March 1, 2015: 3,899
February 1, 2015: 2,396
January 1, 2015: 2,581
December 1, 2014: 2,293
November 1, 2014: 2,265
October 1, 2014: 2,900
September 1, 2014: 2,491
August 1, 2014: 2,276
July 1, 2014: 1954
June 1, 2014: 655 (2nd run: 689)
May 1, 2014: 2,131

Magazines:

February 1, 2017: 1,732 (+354!)
January 1, 2017: 1,378 (+97)
December 1, 2016: 1,281 (+106)
November 1, 2016: 1,175
October 1, 2016: 1,172
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed their search results) Update: 975
August 1, 2016: 788
July 1, 2016: 758
June 1, 2016: 741
May 1, 2016: 714
April 1, 2016: 711
March 1, 2016: 699
February 1, 2016: 685
January 1, 2016: 684
December 1, 2015: 667
November 1, 2015: 646
October 1, 2015: 632
September 1, 2015: 638
August 1, 2015: 636
July 1, 2015: 632
June 1, 2015: 631
May 1, 2015: 630
April 1, 2015: 643
March 1, 2015: 647
February 1, 2015: 638
January 1, 2015: 638
December 1, 2014: 643
November 1, 2014: 646
October 1, 2014: 652
September 1, 2014: 652
August 1, 2014: 649
July 1, 2014: 650
June 1, 2014: 668
May 1, 2014: 671

Newspapers:

February 1, 2017: 158
January 1, 2017: 158
December 1, 2016: 157
November 1, 2016: 158
October 1, 2016: 158
September 1, 2016: 159
August 1, 2016: 160
July 1, 2016: 166
June 1, 2016: 167
May 1, 2016: 168
April 1, 2016: 168
March 1, 2016: 172
February 1, 2016: 172
January 1, 2016: 169
December 1, 2015: 168
November 1, 2015: 168
October 1, 2015: 168
September 1, 2015: 172
August 1, 2015: 173
July 1, 2015: 173
June 1, 2015: 173
May 1, 2015: 172
April 1, 2015: 173
March 1, 2015: 172
February 1, 2015: 170
January 1, 2015: 175
December 1, 2014: 174
November 1, 2014: 174
October 1, 2014: 174
September 1, 2014: 175
August 1, 2014: 174
July 1, 2014: 175
June 1, 2014: 177
May 1, 2014: 178

Blogs:

February 1, 2017: 15,993 (ILMK rank: #8)
January 1, 2017: 15,969 (ILMK rank: #11)
December 1, 2016: 15,942 (ILMK rank: #11)
November 1, 2016: 15,883 (ILMK rank: #10)
October 1, 2016: 15,864 (ILMK rank: #16)
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed their search results) (ILMK rank: #10) Update 15,850
August 1, 2016: 15,792 (ILMK rank: #9)
July 1, 2016: 15,746 (ILMK rank: #8)
June 1, 2016: 15,708 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2016: 15,669 (ILMK rank: #14)
April 1, 2016: 15,351 (ILMK rank: I could not find a ranking for bestselling blogs)
March 1, 2016: 15,144 (ILMK rank: #9)
February 1, 2016: 15,156 (ILMK rank: #10)
January 1, 2016: 15,122 (ILMK rank: #8)
December 1, 2015: 15,071 (ILMK rank: #8)
November 1, 2015: 15,030 (ILMK rank: #8)
October 1, 2015: 14,983 (ILMK rank: #8)
September 1, 2015: 14,923 (ILMK rank: #8)
August 1, 2015: 14,883 (ILMK rank: #8)
July 1, 2015: 14,837 (ILMK rank:#8)
June 1, 2015: 14,768 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2015: 14,679 (ILMK rank: #8)
April 1, 2015: 14,648 (ILMK rank: #9)
March 1, 2015: 14,588 (ILMK rank: #8)
February 1, 2015: 14,419 (ILMK rank: #8)
January 1, 2015: 14,392 (ILMK rank: #10)
December 1, 2014: 14,337 (ILMK rank: #14)
November 1, 2014: 14,267
October 1, 2014: 14,189 (ILMK rank: #11)
September 1, 2014: 14,151 (ILMK rank: #12)
August 1, 2014: 14,089 (ILMK rank: #13)
July 1, 2014: 13,985 (ILMK rank: #13)
June 1, 2014: 13,924 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2014: 13,811 (ILMK rank: #10)

Percentage of books priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars

January 2017 (taken February 1, 2017): 86.7% (4,099,841 of 4,731,096)
December 2016 (taken January 1, 2017): 86.9% (4,109,227 of 4,730,019)
November 2016 (taken December 1, 2016): 86.6% (4,603,953 of 3,989,241)
October 2016 (taken November 1, 2016): 86.3% (3,940,811 of 4,567,105)
September 2016,(taken October 1, 2016): 86.2% (3,881,084 of 4,499,991)
August 2016, (taken September 1, 2016): number unavailable Update: $0.01 to $50=4,470,630 | $0.01 to $9.99=3,853,639 | 86.2%
July 2016, (taken August 1, 2016): 85.6% (3,800,960 of 4,441,416)
June, 2016 (taken July 1, 2016): 86.1% (3,747,972 of 4,606,532)
May 2016, (taken June 1, 2016): 85.6% (4,26,357 of 3,678,86)
April, 2016 (taken May 1, 2016): 85.2% (3,598,659 of 4,225,884)
March, 2016 (taken April 1, 2016): 85.4% (3,587,825 of 4,203,311)
February, 2016 (taken March 1, 2016): 85.2% (3,522,742 of 4,133,304)
January, 2016 (taken February 1, 2016): 85.2% (3,440,910 of 4,038,776)
December, 2016 (taken January 1, 2016): 85.0% (3,350,232 of 3,490,070)
November, 2015 (taken December 1, 2015): 84.9% (3,242,119 of 3,818,499)
October, 2015 (taken November 1, 2015): 84.7% (3,166,691 of 3,736,839)
September, 2015 (taken October 1, 2015): 84.8% (3,096,037 of 3,652,166)
August, 2015: (taken September 1, 2015): 85.3% (3,048,620 of 3,575,587)
July, 2015 (taken August 1, 2015): 85.3% (2,969,714 of 3,482,960)
June, 2015 (taken July 1, 2015: 83.9% (2,893,481 of 3,408,090)
May, 2015 (taken June 1, 2015): 84.7% (2,800,318 of 3,306,054)
April, 2015 (taken May 1, 2015): 84.6% (2,736,106 of 3,232,290)
March, 2015 (taken April 1, 2015): 88.4% (2,802,470 of 3,171,379)
February, 2015 (taken March 1, 2015): 88.3% (2,721,649 of 3,083,344)
January, 2015 (taken February 1, 2015): 88.4% (2,630,162 of 2,976,291)
December, 2014 (taken January 1, 2015): 88.3% (2,567,412 of 2,907,638)
November, 2014 (taken December 1, 2014):88.3% (2,506,715 of 2,838,606)
October, 2014 (taken November 1, 2014): 88.4% (2,451,370 of 2,774,474)
September, 2014: (taken October 1, 2014): 88.2% (2,387,727 of 2,707,622)
August, 2014: (taken September 1, 2014): 87.9% (2,304,717 of 2,621,516)
July, 2014 (taken August 1, 2014): 87.7% (2,232,131 of 2,544,623)
June, 2014 (taken July 1, 2014): 87.7% (2,172,079 of 2,477,343)
May, 2014 (taken June 1, 2014): 74.6% (294,759 of 395,137) | Second run (to account for possible Amazon glitching): 87.6% (2,121,022 of 2,422,630)

Percentage of books with a publication date of the previous month priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars

Books for January, 2017: 92.3% (81,965 of 88,810)
Books for December, 2016: 90.4% (78,386 of 86,689)
Books for November, 2016: 92.3% (80,218 of 86,941)
Books for October, 2016: 87.1% (80,417 of 92,350)
Books for September, 2016: 84.8% (77,656 of 91,542)
Books for August, 2016: 85.6% (83,972 or 98,113)
Books for July, 2016: 88.6% (81,803 of 92,207)
Books for June, 2016: 93.2% (82,227 of 88,180)
Books for May, 2016: 93.1% (82,022 of 88,070)
Books for April, 2016: 92.2% (80,910 of 87,717)
Books for March, 2016: 94.% (95,732 of 101,747)
Books for February 2016: 95.4% (112,307 of 117,729)
Books for January, 2016: 94.2% (87,774 of 93,160)
Books for December, 2016: 94.9% (96,092 of 101,225)
Books for November, 2015: 92.6% (79,061 of 85,397)
Books for October, 2015: 92.2% (76,789 of 83,244)
Books for September, 2015: 92.7% (78,419 of 84,314)
Books for August, 2015: 94.2% (83,159 of 88,243)
Books for July, 2015: 94.3% (81,843 of 86,827)
Books for June, 2015: 94.0% (80,396 of 85,535)
Books for May, 2015: 93.5% (74,211 of 79,388)
Books for April, 2015: 93.3% (76,455 of 81,914)
Books for March, 2015: 93.6% (85,581 of 91,471)
Books for February, 2015: 94.7% (74,806 of 78,979)
Books for January, 2015: 94.6% (73,166 of 77,329)
Books for December, 2014: 95.1% (72,247 of 77,048)
Books for November, 2014: 93.2% (72,264 of 77,550)
Books for October, 2014: 94.0% (72,051 of 76,646)
Books for September, 2014: 95.0% (77,730 of 81,864)
Books for August, 2014: 95.8% (72,127 of 75,293)
Books for July, 2014: 95.8% (72,543 of 75,750)
Books for June, 2014: 94.4% (63,104 of 66,856)
Books for May, 2014: 81.4% (3,177 of 3,905) | 2nd run to account for Amazon possibly glitching: 94.7% (65,080 of 68,713)

Books in the Seventy Percent Royalty Range ($2.99 ‚Äď $9.99)

February 1, 2017: 61.1% (3,073,787 of 5,030,914)
January 1, 2017: 60.9% (3,030,096 of 4,972,110)
December 1, 2016: 60.8% (2,987,081 of 4,908,984)
November 1, 2016: 60.8% (2,956,217 of 4,861,264)
October 1, 2016: 60.6% (2,902,687 of 4,790,218)
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed their search results) | Update on 9/3: 61.1% (2,897,126 of 4,742,587)
August 1, 2016: 61.2% (2,860,965 of 4,673,290)
July 1, 2016: 61.3% (2,821,664 of 4,606,532)
June 1, 2016: 61.0% (2,767,757 of 4,535,673)
May 1, 2016: 60.5% (2,704,477 of 4,466,976)
April 1, 2016: 61.1% (2,707,775 of 4,433,082)
March 1, 2016: 60.8% (2,647,699 of 4,356,852)
February 1, 2016: 60.7% (2,587,810 of 4,20,301)
January 1, 2016: 60.2% (2,507,452 of 4,168,071)
December 1, 2015: 60.5% (2,447,446 of 4,046,825)
November 1, 2015: 60.5% (2,398,461 of 3,961,896)
October 1, 2015: 60.3% (2,338,287 of 3,75,694)
September 1, 2015: 60.7% (2,306,295 of 3,799,099)
August 1, 2015: 60.6% (2,251,364 of 3,714,509)
July 1, 2015: 60.4% (2,195,452 of 3,636,269)
June 1, 2015: 60.5% (2,134,639 of 3,530,378)
May 1, 2015: 60.4% (2,088,376 of 3,457,009)
April 1, 2015: 64.1% (2,164,454 of 3,378,436)
March 1, 2015: 64.2% (2,111,025 of 3,288,124)
February 1, 2015: 64.3% (2,043,564 of 3,178,962)
January 1, 2015: 64.2% (1,992,162 of 3,104,677)
December 1, 2014: 64.2% (1,943,782 of 3,027,234)
November 1, 2014: 64.6% (1,909,982 of 2,958,430)
October 1, 2014: 64.3% (1,857,411 of 2,888,225)
September 1, 2014: 63.9% (1,778,889 of 2,801,221)
August 1, 2014: 63.6% (1,731,841 of 2,724,012)
July 1, 2014: 63.4% (1,684,876 of 2,655,727)
June 1, 2014: 8.7% (225,848 of 2,597,747) | second run to account for Amazon possibly glitching 63.4% (1,647,127 of 2,597,112)
May 1, 2014: 63.8% (1,644,029 of 2,576,453)

Books from one penny to $2.98

February 1, 2017: 21.2% (1,067,995 of 5,030,914)
January 1, 2017: 21.3% (1,057,373 of 4,972,110)
December 1, 2016: 21.2% (1,042,980 of 4,908,984)
November 1, 2016: 21.1% (1,024,995 of 4,861,264)
October 1, 2016: 21.3% (1,018,083 of 4,790,218)
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed their search results) Update 9/3: 21.1% (999,067 of 4,742,587)
August 1, 2016: 20.9% (977,901 of 4,673,290)
July 1, 2016: 20.9% (963,039 of 4,606,532)
June 1, 2016: 20.9% (947,387 of 4,535,673)
May 1, 2016: 20.8% (929,532 of 4,466,976)
April 1, 2016: 20.6% (914,517 of 4,433,082)
March 1, 2016: 20.8% (907,912 of 4,356,852)
February 1, 2016: 20.8% (884,290 of 4,260,301)
January 1, 2016: 20.8% (868,268 of 4,168,071)
December 1, 2015: 20.3% (819,885 of 4,046,825)
November 1, 2015: 20.0% (791,777 of 3,961,896)
October 1, 2015: 20.1% (780,371 of 3,875,694)
September 1, 2015: 20.1% (764,280 of 3,799,009)
August 1, 2015: 19.9% (739,684 of 3,714,509)
July 1, 2015: 19.8% (718,584 of 3,636,269)
June 1, 2015: 20.5% (685,609 of 3,350,378)
May 1, 2015: 19.3% (6,671,179 of 3,457,009)
April 1, 2015: 19.5% (657,728 of 3,378,436)
March 1, 2015: 21.3% (699,221 of 3,288,124)
February 1, 2015: 19.0% (603,638 of 3,178,962)
January 1, 2015: 19.1% (591,610 of 3,104,677)
December 1, 2014: 19.1% (579,121 of 3,027,234)
November 1, 2014: 18.8% (556,881 of 2,958,430)
October 1, 2014: 18.9% (545,350 of 2,888,225)
September 1, 2014: 18.9% (529,976 of 2,801,221)
August 1, 2014: 18.9% (513,541 of 2,724,012)
July 1, 2014: 18.8% (499,756 of 2,655,727)
June 1, 2014: 2.7% (70,679 of 2,596,747) | second run to account for Amazon possibly glitching: 18.7% (485,799 of 2,597,112)
May 1, 2014: 18.4% (474,202 of 2,576,453)

Price Point Analysis of New York Times Hardback Fiction Equivalents

February 1, 2017:

14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99
14.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 14.99

Average: $14.72 (+0.28) 0 titles under $10 ($1.28 higher than one year ago)

January 1, 2017:

14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 13.99
14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 9.99

Average: $14.44 (+.05) 1 title under $10

December 1, 2016:

14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 10.99 14.99 14.99
12.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 12.99

Average: $14.39 (+0.50) 0 titles under $10

November 1, 2016

14.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 13.99
13.99 13.99 14.99 11.99 13.99 9.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 12.99

Average: $13.89 (-.04) 1 title under $10

October 1, 2016

13.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 14.99 13.99
12.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 9.99 12.99 14.99 16.86

Average: $13.93 (+0.29) 1 title under $10

September 1, 2016

13.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99
13.99 14.99 9.99 14.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 12.99

Average: $13.64 (-0.10) 1 title under $10

August 1, 2016

14.99 9.99 13.99 10.99 14.99 9.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 13.99
14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 11.99 13.99

Average: $13.54 (-0.30) 2 titles under $10

July 1, 2016

14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 14.99
14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 12.99 9.99

Average: $13.84 (+0.45) 1 title under $10

June 1, 2016

14.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 10.99
13.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 12.99 8.99

Average: $13.39 (-0.10) 2 titles under $10

May 1, 2016:

14.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 9.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 12.99
13.99 13.99 12.99 $12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 13.99

Average: $13.49 (+0.01) 1 title under $10

April 1, 2016

14.99 14.99 13.99 9.99 13.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 13.99 14.99
13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 13.99 10.99 12.99 14.74 11.99

Average: $13.48 (+0.04) 1 title under $10

March 1, 2016

12.99 13.99 12.99 9.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99
13.99 12.99 13.99 10.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 13.99

Average: $13.44 (+0.17) 1 title under $10

February 1, 2016

12.99 13.99 12.99 13.99 13.99 9.99 12.99 N/A 12.99 12.99
12.99 13.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 N/A 12.99 11.99 13.99

Average: $13.27 (-.52) 1 title under $10

January 1, 2016

12.99 13.99 12.99 14.99 14.99 11.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 14.99
9.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 12.99

Average: $13.79 (+.70) 1 title under $10

December 1, 2015

13.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 10.99 12.99
13.99 9.99 11.99 13.99 4.99 14.99 11.99 13.99 14.99 12.99

Average: $13.09 (-.50) 2 titles under $10

November 1, 2015

12.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 12.99 11.99 14.99
13.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 12.99 13.99 12.99

Average: $13.59 (+.03) 1 title under $10

October 1, 2015

14.99 13.99 13.99 14.99 13.99 7.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.99
12.99 9.45 12.99 14.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 13.99 14.99

Average: $13.56 (+$0.72) 2 titles under $10

September 1, 2015

13.99 7.99 13.99 12.99 14.99 14.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 8.99
11.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99

Average: $12.84 (+$1.33) 3 titles under $10

August 1, 2015

13.99 6.99 13.99 9.99 14.99 9.99 10.99 8.99 8.99 11.43
9.99 11.99 14.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 10.99 12.99 12.99

Average; $11.51 (-$0.62) 6 titles under $10

July 1, 2015

13.99 6.99 8.99 14.99 10.99 11.99 8.99 9.99 12.99 16.99
11.84 12.99 13.99 11.99 9.99 14.99 14.99 10.99 12.99 10.99

Average: $12.13 (+$0.16) 5 titles under $10

June 1, 2015

6.99 13.99 16.99 9.99 9.99 12.99 10.99 8.99 12.99 12.99
11.43 11.99 12.99 12.99 9.99 12.99 11.84 12.31 14.99 10.99

Average: $11.97 (+$1.69) 5 titles under $10

May 1, 2015

6.99 12.31 8.99 8.99 8.97 8.99 12.99 11.84 10.99 11.84
12.99 6.99 11.84 9.99 12.99 12.99 5.99 9.10 12.99 6.86

Average: $10.28 (-$1.40) 10 titles under $10

April 1, 2015

6.99 12.99 9.99 13.59 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 11.99 10.99
12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 9.99 9.19 11.99

Average: $11.68 (+$0.57) 4 titles under $10

March 1, 2015

8.99 11.99 10.49 10.99 12.99 14.99 9.99 9.99 9.99 11.99
12.99 11.99 9.79 11.99 11.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 5.99 12.99

Average: $11.11 (+$1.34) 7 titles under $10

February 1, 2015

8.99 11.99 9.79 12.99 9.79 9.99 11.99 7.99 9.99 3.99
12.99 11.99 8.99 5.99 3.99 10.99 6.99 10.99 12.99 11.99

Average: $9.77 (+$0.11) 11 titles under $10

January 1, 2015

9.99 7.69 9.99 7.19 10.99 11.99 10.99 3.99 11.99 7.49
10.99 11.89 6.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 10.99 5.99 10.99 10.99

Average: $9.66 (+$0.09) 9 titles under $10

December 1, 2014

10.99 12.74 3.25 9.78 4.99 10.99 12.99 6.99 11.84 10.99
10.99 5.00 9.99 9.78 9.09 10.99 10.99 10.99 6.99 10.99

Average: $9.57 (-$0.65) 9 titles under $10

November 1, 2014

10.99 9.99 11.99 6.50 10.99 10.99 6.99 10.99 10.99 10.99
10.99 6.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 10.99 7.99 9.99

Average: $10.22 (-$0.86) 6 titles under $10

October 1, 2014

10.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 12.99 10.99 11.99 12.74 11.99 9.99
10.99 10.99 8.99 6.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 12.99 7.99 12.99

Average: $11.08 (-$0.43) 4 titles under $10

September 1, 2014

9.99 10.99 13.99 10.99 6.99 13.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 11.99
10.99 14.99 11.84 11.99 9.99 11.84 8.99 11.99 12.74 10.99

Average: $11.51 (+$0.56) 4 titles under $10

August 1, 2014

8.99 8.99 10.99 11.99 11.84 6.99 11.99 10.99 10.99 10.99
10.99 8.52 12.99 14.99 10.99 N/A 12.74 10.99 10.99 9.99

Average: $10.95 (+$0.30) 5 titles under $10

July 1, 2014

11.84 8.99 11.99 11.99 10.99 6.99 11.99 11.84 12.99 10.49
10.99 7.99 11.99 10.99 7.99 11.99 5.99 11.84 12.99 9.99

Average: $10.64 (+$0.22) 6 titles under $10

June 1, 2014

8.99 7.50 8.99 8.99 12.99 10.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 14.44
10.99 10.99 9.99 11.84 10.99 8.99 11.84 10.99 5.99 10.99

Average: $10.42 (-$0.16) 8 titles under $10

May 1, 2014

10.99 11.04 10.99 7.50 8.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 12.99
11.04 5.99 10.99 9.10 12.99 8.55 10.99 13.99 9.99 9.45

Average: $10.58 (-$0.27) 7 titles under $10

Textbooks in the Kindle Store

February 1, 2017: 48,037
January 1, 2017: 47,568
December 1, 2016: 47,079
November 1, 2016: 59,790
October 1, 2016: 58,158
September 1, 2016: number unavailable (Amazon has changed its search results)| 9/3: 58,033
August 1, 2016: 64,027
July 1, 2016: 63,869
June 1, 2016: 63,301
May 1, 2016: 62,577
April 1, 2016: 61,867
March 1, 2016: 61,532
February 1, 2016: 60,985
January 1, 2016: 59,826
December 1, 2015: 59,953
November 1, 2015: 58,582
October 1, 2015: 58,203
September 1, 2015: 48,650
August 1, 2015: 48,063
July 1, 2015: 47,977
June 1, 2015: 47,388
May 1, 2015: 46,799
April 1, 2015: 46,482
March 1, 2015: 46,145
February 1, 2015: 46,265
January 1, 2015: 45,345
December 1, 2014: 44,787
November 1, 2014: 44,250
October 1, 2014: 43,910
September 1, 2014: 43,385
August 1, 2014: 42,643
July 1, 2014: 42,114
June 1, 2014: 40,810
May 1, 2014: 39,687

Free books (including public domain)

February 1, 2017: 89,546 (-1%)
January 1, 2017: 90,706 (+0%)
December 1, 2016: 90,637 (+1%)
November 1, 2016: 88,973 (-1%)
October 1, 2016: 90,005 (-0%)
September 1, 2016: number not available (Amazon has changed its search results) 9/3: 90,180 (+3%)
August 1, 2016: 87,789 (-2%)
July 1, 2016: 89,564 (+5%)
June 1, 2016: 85,502 (-0%)
May 1, 2016: 85,895 (+3%)
April 1, 2016: 83,725 (-1%)
March 1, 2016: 84,422 (+2%)
February 1, 2016: 82,583 (-0%)
January 1, 2016: 82,656 (+2%)
December 1, 2015: 81,264 (+1%)
November 1, 2015: 80,629 (+1%)
October 1, 2015: 79,676 (+2%)
September 1, 2015: 77,976 (-1%)
August 1, 2015: 78,922 (+1%)
July 1, 2015: 77,735 (+1%)
June 1, 2015: 76,688 (-1%)
May 1, 2015: 77,248 (+3%)
April 1, 2015: 74,974 (-0%)
March 1, 2015: 75,030 (+2%)
February 1, 2015: 73,489 (+0%)
January 1, 2015: 73,041 (+13%)
December 1, 2014: 64,805
November 1, 2014: 63,897
October 1, 2014: 61,828
September 1, 2014: 61,787
August 1, 2014: 61,381
July 1, 2014: 60,103
June 1, 2014: 59,848
May 1, 2014: 59,957

Free books (without public domain)

February 1, 2017: 45,278 (-2%)
January 1, 2017: 46,345 (-1%)
December 1, 2016: 46,627 (+4%)
November 1, 2016: 44,710 (-2%)
October 1, 2016: 45,792 (-0%)
September 1, 2016: number not available (Amazon has changed its search results) | 9/3: 45,975 (+5%)
August 1, 2016: 43,638 (-5%)
July 1, 2016: 45,814 (+11%)
June 1, 2016: 41,428
May 1, 2016: 41,755
April 1, 2016: 39,760
March 1, 2016: 41,277
February 1, 2016: 38,516 (-0%)
January 1, 2016: 38,550 (+4%)
December 1, 2015: 37,191 (+55%)
November 1, 2015: 23,872 (+2%)
October 1, 2015: 23,307 (+8%)
September 1, 2015: 21,575 (-3%)
August 1, 2015: 22,154 (+3%)
July 1, 2015: 21,572 (+4%)
June 1, 2015: 20,740 (-3%)
May 1, 2015: 21,362 (+9%)
April 1, 2015: 19,508 (+1%)
March 1, 2015: 19,232 (+4%)
February 1, 2015: 18,489 (+3%)
January 1, 2015: 17,983 (+5%)
December 1, 2014: 17,160
November 1, 2014: 16,735
October 1, 2014: 15,099
September 1, 2014: 15,190
August 1, 2014: 14,717
July 1, 2014: 13,300
June 1, 2014: 12,490
May 1, 2014: 13,191

Spanish edition books*

February 1, 2017: 212,667 (+2%)
January 1, 2017: 208,843 (+2%)
December 1, 2016: 204,709 (+2%)
November 1, 2016: 201,195
October 1, 2016: 197,286 (+1)
September 1, 2016: number not available (Amazon has changed its search results) | 9/3: 194,747 (+0%)
August 1, 2016: 193,784 (+2%)
July 1, 2016: 190,183 (+2%)
June 1, 2016: 186,750 (+2%)
May 1, 2016: 183,132 (+1)
April 1, 2016: 180,538 (+2%)
March 1, 2016: 176,351 (+3%)
February 1, 2016: 172,246 (+5%)
January 1, 2016: 168,253 (+3%)
December 1, 2015: 163,218 (+2%)
November 1, 2015: 160,225 (+3%)
October 1, 2015: 156,158 (+2%)
September 1, 2015: 152,538 (+3%)
August 1, 2015: 148,388 (+4%)
July 1, 2015: 143,665 (+3%)
June 1, 2015: 139,519 (+2%)
May 1, 2015: 137,022 (+3%)
April 1, 2015: 132,496 (+3%)
March 1, 2015: 128,918 (+3%)
February 1, 2015: 125,505 (+2%)
January 1, 2015: 123,171 (+3%)
December 1, 2014: 119,963
November 1, 2014: 116,680
October 1, 2014: 113,491
September 1, 2014: 109,395
August 1, 2014: 101,643
July 1, 2014: 98,048
June 1, 2014: 95,632
May 1, 2014: 92,954

Books in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL)

February 1, 2017: 1,462,182 (29.1%)
January 1, 2017: 1,444,685 (29.1%)
December 1, 2016: 1,429,581 (29.1%)
November 1, 2016: 1,396,901 (28.7%)
October 1, 2016: 1,377,307 (+0%)
September 1, 2016: number not available (Amazon has changed its search results) | 9/3: 1,371,701 (+2%)
August 1, 2016: 1,338,554 (29.6%)
July 1, 2016: 1,340,583 (29.1%)
June 1, 2016: 1,298,473 (28.1%)
May 1, 2016: 1,262,989 (28.3%)
April 1, 2016: 1,277,964 (28.8%)
March 1, 2016: 1,250,894
February 1, 2016: 1,199,281 (26%)
January 1, 2016: 1,168,736 (28.0%)
December 1, 2015: 1,132,942 (28.0%)
November 1, 2015: 1,109,339 (28.0%)
October 1, 2015: 1,084,779 (27.9%)
September 1, 2015: 1,057,291 (27.9%)
August 1, 2015: 1,022,270 (27.5%)
July 1, 2015: 995,047 (27.4%)
June 1, 2015: 957,481 (27.1%)
May 1, 2015: 920,564 (26.6%)
April 1, 2015: 890,629 (24.3%)
March 1, 2015: 853,036 (25.9%)
February 1, 2015: 823,258 (25.9%)
January 1, 2015: 794,093 (25.6%)
December 1, 2014: 764,249 (25.2%)
November 1, 2014: 724,218 (25.1%)
October 1, 2014: 710,979 (24.6%)
September 1, 2014: 673,206 (24.0%)
August 1, 2014: 638,545 (23.4%)
July 1, 2014: 604,950 (22.8%)
June 1, 2014: 586,812 (22.6%)
May 1, 2014: 566,893 (22.0%)

Books in Kindle Unlimited

February 1, 2017: 1,499,100 (29.8% of total)
January 1, 2017: 1,476,314 (29.7% of total)
December 1, 2016: 1,460,545 (29.8% of the total)
November 1, 2016: 1,423,511
October 1, 2016: 1,404,125 (29.3% of the total)
September 1, 2016: 1,387,593
August 1, 2016: 1,361,620
July 1, 2016: 1,340,737 (29.1% of total)
June 1, 2016: 1,311,185
May 1, 2016: 1,282,695 (28.7% of total)
April 1, 2016: 1,295,483 (29.2% of total)
March 1, 2016: 1,268,842 (29.1% of total)
February 1, 2016: 1,217,059 (28.5% of total)
January 1, 2016: 1,189,911 (28.5% of total)
December 1, 2015: 1,156,686 (28.6% of total)
November 1, 2015: 1,133,293 (28.6% of total)
October 1, 2015: 1,108,762 +2%) (28.6% of total)
September 1, 2015: 1,084,510 (+3%) (28.5% of total)
August 1, 2015: 1,050,688 (+3%) (28.3% of total)
July 1, 2015: 1,023,395 (+4%) (28.1% of total)
June 1, 2015: 984,701 (+4%) (27.9% of total)
May 1, 2015: 948,638 (+3%) (27.4% of total)
April 1, 2015: 918,839 (+4%) (27.2% of total)
March 1, 2015: 880,916 (+4%)
February 1, 2015: 850,027 (+4%)
January 1, 2015: 820,865 (+4%)
December 1, 2014: 791,011 (+3%)
November 1, 2014: 765,236 (+4%)
October 1, 2014: 733,167 (+5%)
September 1, 2014: 696,171 (+5%)
August 1, 2014: 661,111 (new measurement)

Books in Prime Reading

February 1, 2017: 980 (-552)
January 1, 2017: 1,532 (+504)
December 1, 2016: 1,028
November 1, 2016: 1,013 (new measurement)

Books in the Kindle Matchbook program

February 1, 2017: 74,252
January 1, 2017: 74,441
December 1, 2016: 74,452
November 1, 2016: 74,747
October 1, 2016: 75,067
September 1, 2016: number not available (Amazon has changed its search results) | 9/3: 75,242
August 1, 2016: 75,478
July 1, 2016: 75,794 (-0%)
June 1, 2016: 75,937
May 1, 2016: 76,194 (-0%)
April 1, 2016: 76,497 (-1%)
March 1, 2016: 77,175 (-1%)
February 1, 2016: 77,613 (-0%)
January 1, 2016: 77,877 (-0%)
December 1, 2015: 78,148 (-0%)
November 1, 2015: 78,422 (-0%)
October 1, 2015: 78,677 (-0%)
September 1, 2015: 78,940 (-0%)
August 1, 2015: 79,174 (-1%)
July 1, 2015: 79,656 (-0%)
June 1, 2015: 79,917 (-0%)
May 1, 2015: 80,311 (-0%)
April 1, 2015: 80,594 (-1%)
March 1, 2015: 81,045 (-0%)
February 1, 2015: 81,515 (-0%)
January 1, 2015: 82,228 (-1%)
December 1, 2014: 82,643 (+1%)
November 1, 2014: 81,969 (+81%)
October 1, 2014: 45,267 (-39%)
September 1, 2014: 73,820 (+8%)
August 1, 2014: 68,453 (+1%)
July 1, 2014: 67,466 (-1%)
June 1, 2014: 67,787 (-1%)
May 1, 2014: 68,240 (-16%)

Price Point Analysis

April 1, 2010 was “Agency Day”, when the pricing system for some of the largest trade publishers in the US changed. I’ve started tracking price points, to see how that is affecting things. These are not ranges: it’s how many books are at a specific price point.

2/1/2017
Total 5,030,914
Prime 4,731,096
Under $10 4,099,841
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 610,715 12.14% -0.19%
$1.99 244,770 4.87% 0.15%
$2.99 933,874 18.56% 0.14%
$3.99 372,344 7.40% 0.06%
$4.99 277,330 5.51% -0.09%
$5.99 146,309 2.91% 0.01%
$6.99 97,252 1.93% 0.00%
$7.99 131,445 2.61% -0.01%
$8.99 73,745 1.47% 0.01%
$9.99 374,666 7.45% 0.07%
$10.99 36,565 0.73% 0.03%
$11.99 45,970 0.91% 0.00%
$12.99 35,339 0.70% -0.01%
$13.99 23,191 0.46% -0.01%
$14.99 43,217 0.86% 0.00%
$15.99 15,411 0.31% -0.02%
$16.99 14,441 0.29% 0.00%
$17.99 8,561 0.17% 0.01%
$18.99 7,952 0.16% 0.00%
$19.99 18,595 0.37% 0.01%
$20.99 2,757 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 3,335 0.07% 0.01%
$22.99 4,439 0.09% 0.00%
$23.99 5,540 0.11% 0.00%
$24.99 5,655 0.11% 0.00%

1/1/2017
Total 4,972,110
Prime 4,730,019
Under $10 4,109,227
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 613,271 12.33% 0.12%
$1.99 234,236 4.71% -0.11%
$2.99 916,038 18.42% 0.04%
$3.99 365,034 7.34% -0.01%
$4.99 278,443 5.60% 0.01%
$5.99 143,880 2.89% 0.00%
$6.99 95,969 1.93% 0.02%
$7.99 130,308 2.62% 0.03%
$8.99 72,331 1.45% -0.02%
$9.99 366,584 7.37% -0.01%
$10.99 34,861 0.70% 0.00%
$11.99 45,242 0.91% -0.01%
$12.99 35,454 0.71% 0.00%
$13.99 23,493 0.47% -0.01%
$14.99 42,874 0.86% 0.02%
$15.99 16,195 0.33% 0.01%
$16.99 14,327 0.29% -0.02%
$17.99 7,821 0.16% 0.00%
$18.99 7,838 0.16% -0.01%
$19.99 17,748 0.36% 0.00%
$20.99 2,714 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 3,034 0.06% 0.00%
$22.99 4,382 0.09% 0.00%
$23.99 5,445 0.11% 0.00%
$24.99 5,764 0.12% 0.00%

12/1/2016
Total 4,908,984
Prime 4,603,953
Under $10 3,989,241
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 599,433 12.21% 0.06%
$1.99 236,600 4.82% 0.08%
$2.99 902,330 18.38% 0.03%
$3.99 361,037 7.35% -0.09%
$4.99 274,351 5.59% 0.04%
$5.99 142,254 2.90% 0.02%
$6.99 93,552 1.91% 0.04%
$7.99 126,945 2.59% 0.00%
$8.99 72,556 1.48% 0.00%
$9.99 362,520 7.38% 0.05%
$10.99 34,569 0.70% 0.03%
$11.99 44,997 0.92% 0.02%
$12.99 34,970 0.71% 0.02%
$13.99 23,786 0.48% 0.01%
$14.99 41,442 0.84% 0.02%
$15.99 15,552 0.32% 0.01%
$16.99 15,113 0.31% 0.00%
$17.99 7,573 0.15% 0.00%
$18.99 8,235 0.17% 0.00%
$19.99 17,422 0.35% 0.00%
$20.99 2,742 0.06% 0.00%
$21.99 3,044 0.06% 0.00%
$22.99 4,368 0.09% 0.00%
$23.99 5,291 0.11% 0.00%
$24.99 5,563 0.11% -0.11%

11/2/2016
Total 4,863,729
Prime 4,569,483
Under $10 3,942,697
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 590,896 12.15% -0.14%
$1.99 230,668 4.74% 0.05%
$2.99 892,564 18.35% 0.08%
$3.99 362,196 7.45% 0.06%
$4.99 270,058 5.55% 0.00%
$5.99 139,806 2.87% 0.04%
$6.99 90,844 1.87% 0.00%
$7.99 126,013 2.59% 0.00%
$8.99 71,962 1.48% 0.01%
$9.99 356,843 7.34% -0.02%
$10.99 33,001 0.68% 0.02%
$11.99 43,725 0.90% 0.00%
$12.99 33,898 0.70% 0.00%
$13.99 23,073 0.47% 0.01%
$14.99 40,183 0.83% 0.00%
$15.99 15,048 0.31% 0.00%
$16.99 15,156 0.31% 0.00%
$17.99 7,379 0.15% 0.01%
$18.99 8,059 0.17% 0.00%
$19.99 17,232 0.35% 0.00%
$20.99 2,665 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 2,927 0.06% 0.00%
$22.99 4,260 0.09% 0.00%
$23.99 5,211 0.11% 0.00%
$24.99 11,000 0.23% 0.00%

10/1/2016
Total 4,790,218
Prime 4,499,991
Under $10 3,881,084
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 588,648 12.29% -0.18%
$1.99 224,653 4.69% 0.33%
$2.99 875,028 18.27% -0.32%
$3.99 354,048 7.39% -0.13%
$4.99 266,028 5.55% -0.01%
$5.99 135,815 2.84% -0.09%
$6.99 89,542 1.87% 0.01%
$7.99 123,897 2.59% 0.00%
$8.99 70,532 1.47% 0.01%
$9.99 352,365 7.36% 0.00%
$10.99 31,758 0.66% 0.00%
$11.99 42,922 0.90% -0.01%
$12.99 33,394 0.70% 0.03%
$13.99 22,477 0.47% 0.01%
$14.99 39,529 0.83% 0.02%
$15.99 14,933 0.31% 0.01%
$16.99 14,867 0.31% 0.00%
$17.99 7,003 0.15% 0.00%
$18.99 7,829 0.16% 0.01%
$19.99 16,983 0.35% 0.01%
$20.99 2,639 0.06% 0.00%
$21.99 2,752 0.06% 0.00%
$22.99 4,276 0.09% 0.00%
$23.99 5,206 0.11% 0.01%
$24.99 10,825 0.23% 0.00%

8/1/2016
Total 4,673,290
Prime 4,441,416
Under $10 3,800,960

Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 564,512 12.08% 0.03%
$1.99 215,983 4.62% 0.03%
$2.99 865,582 18.52% 0.02%
$3.99 357,735 7.65% 0.02%
$4.99 258,868 5.54% 0.02%
$5.99 143,549 3.07% 0.02%
$6.99 86,956 1.86% 0.01%
$7.99 120,791 2.58% -0.03%
$8.99 67,036 1.43% 0.11%
$9.99 340,609 7.29% -0.01%
$10.99 31,839 0.68% -0.01%
$11.99 43,170 0.92% 0.10%
$12.99 28,881 0.62% 0.01%
$13.99 20,411 0.44% 0.03%
$14.99 38,284 0.82% -0.10%
$15.99 13,228 0.28% 0.02%
$16.99 14,674 0.31% -0.01%
$17.99 6,244 0.13% 0.01%
$18.99 7,055 0.15% 0.00%
$19.99 16,322 0.35% 0.02%
$20.99 2,484 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 2,610 0.06% 0.01%
$22.99 4,466 0.10% 0.02%
$23.99 4,107 0.09% 0.00%
$24.99 10,627 0.23% 0.01%


9/1/2016
Total 4,742,587
Prime 4,470,630
Under $10 3,853,639

Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 591,306 12.47% 0.39%
$1.99 206,770 4.36% -0.26%
$2.99 881,283 18.58% 0.06%
$3.99 356,645 7.52% -0.13%
$4.99 263,638 5.56% 0.02%
$5.99 138,830 2.93% -0.14%
$6.99 88,366 1.86% 0.00%
$7.99 122,765 2.59% 0.00%
$8.99 69,196 1.46% 0.02%
$9.99 349,005 7.36% 0.07%
$10.99 31,536 0.66% -0.02%
$11.99 43,107 0.91% -0.01%
$12.99 31,596 0.67% 0.05%
$13.99 21,668 0.46% 0.02%
$14.99 38,116 0.80% -0.02%
$15.99 14,109 0.30% 0.01%
$16.99 14,584 0.31% -0.01%
$17.99 6,818 0.14% 0.01%
$18.99 7,355 0.16% 0.00%
$19.99 16,289 0.34% -0.01%
$20.99 2,559 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 2,710 0.06% 0.00%
$22.99 4,298 0.09% 0.00%
$23.99 4,791 0.10% 0.01%
$24.99 10,719 0.23% 0.00%

8/1/2016      
Total 4,606,532    
Prime 4,361,423    
Under $10 3,747,972    
       
       
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$0.99 555,258 12.05% 0.04%
$1.99 211,667 4.59% 0.02%
$2.99 852,080 18.50% -0.02%
$3.99 351,616 7.63% 0.04%
$4.99 254,338 5.52% -0.02%
$5.99 140,421 3.05% 0.01%
$6.99 85,088 1.85% -0.06%
$7.99 120,451 2.61% 0.10%
$8.99 61,016 1.32% 0.02%
$9.99 336,093 7.30% -0.05%
$10.99 31,772 0.69% -0.04%
$11.99 37,888 0.82% 0.00%
$12.99 28,219 0.61% 0.01%
$13.99 18,732 0.41% 0.00%
$14.99 42,554 0.92% 0.15%
$15.99 12,223 0.27% 0.00%
$16.99 15,085 0.33% 0.02%
$17.99 5,735 0.12% 0.00%
$18.99 6,838 0.15% 0.02%
$19.99 15,340 0.33% -0.03%
$20.99 2,270 0.05% 0.00%
$21.99 2,272 0.05% -0.01%
$22.99 3,487 0.08% 0.00%
$23.99 3,984 0.09% 0.00%
$24.99 9,788 0.21% -0.01%

6/1/2016
Total 4,535,673
Prime 4,296,347
Under $10 3,678,896
Price Point Count Percentage
$0.99 544,905 12.01%
$1.99 207,658 4.58%
$2.99 839,809 18.52%
$3.99 344,572 7.60%
$4.99 251,410 5.54%
$5.99 137,958 3.04%
$6.99 86,573 1.91%
$7.99 114,012 2.51%
$8.99 59,121 1.30%
$9.99 333,073 7.34%
$10.99 32,897 0.73%
$11.99 37,424 0.83%
$12.99 27,483 0.61%
$13.99 18,472 0.41%
$14.99 35,286 0.78%
$15.99 12,056 0.27%
$16.99 13,744 0.30%
$17.99 5,738 0.13%
$18.99 5,941 0.13%
$19.99 16,299 0.36%
$20.99 2,239 0.05%
$21.99 2,661 0.06%
$22.99 3,561 0.08%
$23.99 4,103 0.09%
$24.99 9,940 0.22%

Older data were drawn using http://www.jungle-search.com, newer data with http://www.ereaderiq.com (from the same people). There are a number of possible sources of errors (eRi, Amazon, me), but these are probably pretty good.

  • The free books referenced here are from the Kindle store: there are many other sources for free books
  • My search for textbooks definitely has false positives (books that aren‚Äôt really textbooks). I search for -domain (to eliminate public domain titles, which would be older books, generally) textbook. That would find a book about textbooks, for example
  • I searched for “Spanish edition” to find Spanish language books. That has some false positives as well
  • I look at price percentages of books in the range of one penny to fifty dollars, to eliminate freebies and limit textbooks
  • The price point analysis is for books at that specific price: it does not represent a range of prices
  • I compared the percentage of price points in the Price Point Analysis when I showed the difference…not the number of books
  • This information is based on what a United States customer sees

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :)

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

“When will the book be available in paper?”

January 31, 2017

“When will the book be available in paper?”

Customer: “I’d like ten copies of ‘Bregalad’s Story’ in hardback.”

Bookseller: “Sure. Plant this pinecone and come back in ten years.”

ūüėČ

I recently wrote about how

George Orwell’s

1984 (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

is sold out as a physical book at Amazon:

1984 is sold out in hardback & paperback at Amazon…but Kindleers can read it for free

(one of my readers, alanchurch, pointed out that it can also be purchased as a Kindle e-book, besides reading it for free).

That got me thinking…

One of the biggest complaints when the Kindle was first released in late 2007 (so we are coming up on a decade of Kindling later this year) was that many of the books people wanted weren’t available as e-books, although they could get them in paper. At the time, many people were thinking of replacing the books they had in paper (or having them in both formats), or getting the latest releases.

When the USA Kindle store opened, there were fewer than 100,000 titles. It took quite a while before we could routinely get the latest releases, and well-known backlist (older) titles were scarce.

Now, ten years later, 1984 is an example of the opposite: a well-known backlist title only available as an e-book from Amazon. To be clear, 1984 isn’t out of print: it’s just out of stock. However, that’s something that’s to be expected. Paper doesn’t grow on– scratch that. ūüėČ Paper comes from a natural resource, and those are almost by definition limited.

It’s possible that some acceptable synthetic paper for books will be developed, but that hasn’t happened at a commercial level yet.

I think it’s likely that we will increasingly see shortages in physical books. Another reason is that published books can be gotten much more quickly and in many markets, more than they used to be. That puts more demand on the supply, and while I’m not sure, I’d be surprised if they are able to produce books (after they are written, edited, designed, and formatted) a whole lot faster and in greater quantities.

I did a bit of an analysis of this in 2009:

Ghosts of p-books past

As an update, I took a quick look at the Xanth series by Piers Anthony, which I had analyzed before.

Looking at the

Xanth series page (at AmazonSmile*)

they list 35 titles (that’s not how I would do the series, by the way).

Of those, 18 say they are available in Kindle (about 51%).

16 of the 35¬†had “get it by” dates for physical books, indicating that they are in stock, or at least can be ordered for quick delivery (about 46%).

The other p-books may be available to purchase used or from third-parties, of course, but I’m really looking at books you can order new directly from Amazon.

Two of the books with “get it by” dates are not available in Kindle format…about 6%.

Three of the books available in Kindle format do not have “get it by” printed books…so while it isn’t by much, more books are available in e-book and not in p-book than the other way around.

Another major change over time has been the number of books available only in e-b0ok form…books which have, in many cases, never been published in paper.

Those are commonly “indies”: independently published titles, often by the authors themselves. They may, by the way, be available in “print-on-demand” form, which may counter the trend which I am discussing to some extent.

Many of those books now sell quite well.

I’m not suggesting that more books are available in e-book than p-book right now.

There are now¬†5,029,411 titles in the USA Kindle store. There are now¬†21,907,515 paperbacks (not paperbooks…paperback format) listed as available new from Amazon.com.

Over time, though, I think it’s likely that we will see a higher percentage of cases where a popular book is unavailable in printed form and available in a Kindle format.

What do you think? If popular books are increasingly unavailable in printed format and available in e-book, will that speed e-book adoption? What impact will print-on-demand have? How impactful is it when someone reads their first book in e-book form…did that convert you to at least a “sometimes” e-book reader? Is synthetic paper a viable option? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz

January 29, 2017

Titles/band names which came from books: a quiz

I recently wrote about the sudden popularity of George Orwell’s¬†1984 (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*):

1984 is sold out in hardback & paperback at Amazon…but Kindleers can read it for free

There were some great comments in response (reading and responding to respectful comments is one of my favorite things about doing this blog).

One of them questioningly connected the CBS reality show Big Brother with 1984.

That interested me, and shouldn’t have surprised me.

It’s one of the reasons I place no statute of limitations on spoilers. ūüôā I am as careful about spoiling The Wizard of Oz or Citizen Kane as I am about a movie in theatres now. People enter pop culture awareness all the time: children growing up, people coming from different cultures, people who have just gotten into reading (as one example).

It’s quite possible that the majority of people in America today first encountered the phrase “Big Brother” meaning a…surveilling authority through the TV show, not through the book. I used to do Shakespeare on stage, and I remember seeing something that suggested more people watch a single episode of the most popular sitcom of the day than have seen all of Shakespeare’s plays live on stage…combined through history.

If a creator chooses to use a phrase from a book as a title, I don’t think they generally intend to usurp the popular association. I think they tend to use it ironically, or to have their readers and potential readers be informed by the allusion.

I named my own book of quotations

The Mind Boggles: A Unique Book of Quotations (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

after a quotation from a movie (The Thing). I didn’t think most people would make the connection right away, but that some people would.

Given that this is the case, that much of an audience may encounter the quotation before the source, I thought it would be fun to do a little quiz. ūüôā

In each of these cases, I knew the original source before it was used as a title for another work. For that reason, I think I assumed that other readers did, too…but that was certainly presumptuous on my part.

I’ll give you ten titles (and I’ve decided to include band names) taken from books (that could include things like fairy tales, possibly…written word works might be the best description. They won’t have originated in visual media, like TV and movies). See how many of the original sources you know! Feel free to make your guesses in comments to this post if you’d like others to see it. No fair looking it up before you do so, though: let others try to guess using just their own minds. ūüėČ

Tell you what I’ll do: if you make a comment guessing at at least one of these, and we’ll have to use the honor system that you didn’t research them, I’ll put you in a pool to get a free e-book gift of The Mind Boggles (if you tell me you might want one in the post…be aware that I’ll need to send it to the e-mail address listed privately when you post. My readers don’t see your e-mail address, but I do). I’m going to figure right now on gifting up to five copies, but might flex that depending on how many “players” there are. Note also that you’d have to be in a place where you can get a gift from the USA through Amazon.com.

I’m not going to base it on how many you get right, because again, it would be easy to look them up. If I get more than five qualifying requests, I’ll randomize (unless I decide to give more).

Your comment must be made before I publish the answers…probably in a few days.

Okay, here we go!

  1. Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
  2. Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger
  3. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  4. Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein
  5. The Dogs of War by Frederick Forsyth
  6. The Doors (the name of the band…and the origin of the name of the book on which the band name was based)
  7. The band Steppenwolf
  8. The band Veruca Salt
  9. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
  10. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

How many of these do you know? Ready, set, and then let’s go! ūüėČ

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

1984 is sold out in hardback & paperback at Amazon…but Kindleers can read it for free

January 27, 2017

1984 is sold out in hardback & paperback at Amazon…but Kindleers can read it for free

George Orwell’s

1984 (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

is currently “Temporarily out of stock” in hardback and paperback at Amazon, and that’s getting some media coverage.

It’s widely believed that the dystopian novel (written in 1948…which reportedly is why 1984 was chosen as the year of the future) sales’ spiked massively after people saw a parallel between a term used by a member of the President’s administration and the Orwellian term of “Newspeak”. I think it’s reasonable that there was a connection: there hasn’t been a new movie or TV adaptation, a big sale, a sequel, or a death related to it, all of which can cause an uptick in sales for a book.

So, given that there is also likely to be a waiting list at a public library for the p-book (paperbook), does that mean people can’t read it right now to get the perspective?

Thanks to e-books, the answer is no.

1984 is available as part of

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

which is Amazon’s subser (subscription service) for e-books. If someone is already a member (we’ve been happy members since it launched), they can read it as part of their $9.99 a month price (it has also been discounted from time to time) at no additional cost. If someone isn’t a member…they can get a trial membership, and could hypothetically cancel after reading 1984 and before the money came out the first time.

Do you have to own a Kindle?

Again, no.

There are free

Kindle reading apps (at AmazonSmile*)

for a multitude of devices.

This is important, and not just from a retail point of view.

I have talked about the legal market so far, but imagine that what we are talking about is a document in opposition to a totalitarian government (I say totalitarian because they tend to suppress the free exchange of information…most small “d” democratic countries allow the populace to buy books critical of the current government).

It is much easier to control the exchange of physical books than of e-books, as I wrote about roughly six and a half years ago in

Fahrenheit 111000011

There was a lot of concern expressed when Amazon removed copies of (ironically) 1984 from owners’ Kindles back in 2009, and which was the subject of one of my first posts in this blog (and one which got a mention from Stephen Windwalker (@Windwalkerhere) back then, perhaps helping spur interest in ILMK):

All’s Well That Orwells

People were afraid that e-books could mean that control of literature might be concentrated in very few (or even one) organization.

In that case, my understanding is that what happened was that a company that published the book for Australia, where it is in the public domain (no longer under copyright protection), did not intend it for the USA market (where it is still under copyright protection). Amazon accidentally made it available in the USA, and the e-tailer removed the copies which people had purchased.

Amazon CEO (Chief Executive Officer) called it “stupid” and customers were more than compensated for Amazon’s error.

Still, if Amazon decided not to sell that book or some other one, would that control the literature, affecting opposition thinking?

E-books can be illegally distributed pretty easily…I am not advocating that, of course, but it can be done. Those could be e-books of what was published in paper: someone could take a picture of each page, for example, and then “publish” that as a pdf.

What if a government shutdown all access to the internet, and outlawed every kind of electronic device?

Well, yes, that would hypothetically be possible, but would really impact their economic viability…even China doesn’t do that. Internet access in some countries is very limited, but people often still have electronic devices so hand-passed media would still be a distribution channel.

Would it be easier to make and distribute digital copies…or paper copies? I think that seems obvious…electronics could be done in a much simpler way.

This example of 1984 being easily available legally in e-book form right now and not available easily as a physical book is one example of the difference in distribution…and how it would be harder to suppress.

Two hundred years from now, it’s possible that p-books will have survived and e-books won’t have…but if your concern is the ability to spread information to affect a modern government right here and right now, e-books are going to be more effective.

Bonus deal: for a limited time, Amazon is giving a 10% discount when you buy two Fire tablets, and a 15% discount on two Fire cases:

Fire Tablet (at AmazonSmile*)

Some restrictions apply (although it appears to apply to all current models), and it may not apply in your country or still be in effect when you check…so do check that it is available (there should be a banner at the top of the page) before you check-out.

The deal currently is that you use a promo code of FIRE2PACK for the devices and CASE2PACK for the cases.

What do you think? How did people make the connection between what they heard in the news and an almost 60 year old science fiction novel? Are e-books harder to suppress than p-books? Is a bigger fear that a government would subtly alter a book, rather than censor it altogether? Has a current event ever prompted you to read an older book for perspective? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join thousands of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

All aboard our new The Measured Circle’s Geek Time Trip at The History Project!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.


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