Snapshot: August 1 2014

August 1, 2014

Snapshot: August 1 2014

I generally run this information through eReaderIQ.com (it’s just easier than Amazon), and there are some vagaries in the searches (both there and on Amazon). I do try to run it the same way every time, so unless Amazon changes something, it should give you a pretty good idea.  NOTE: I’ve changed this explanation from saying “Jungle-Search.com” to “eReaderIQ.com”. It’s the same people and I assume the results are the same. eReaderIQ is just for the Kindle, Jungle-Search does Amazon generally. eReaderIQ has a slightly better interface for the searches.

Titles in Kindle Store

20140801 TitlesinStore

August 1, 2014: 2,724,012
July 1, 2014: 2,655,727
June 1, 2014: 2,596,747 (2,597,112 for second run)
May 1, 2014: 2,576,453
April 1, 2014: 2,512,520
March 1, 2014: 2,462,832
February 1, 2014: 2,411,705
January 1, 2014: 2,351,290
December 1, 2013: 2,287,866
November 1, 2013: 2,229,223
October 1, 2013: 2,175,847
September 1, 2013: 2,081,800
August 1, 2013:  2,060,431
July 1, 2013: 1,998,705
June 1, 2013: 1,972,277
May 1, 2013: 1,940,274
April 1, 2013: 1,924,138
March 1, 2013: 1,913,164
February 1, 2013: 1,849,479
January 1, 2013: 1,805,001
December 1, 2012: 1,742,991
November 1, 2012: 1,641,362
October 1, 2012: 1,579,329
September 1, 2012: 1,531,069
August 1, 2012: 1,486,649
July 1, 2012: 1,451,504
June 1, 2012: 1,407,210
May 1, 2012: 1,358,922
April 1, 2012: 1,315,927
March 1, 2012: 1,265,632
February 1, 2012: 1,207,522
January 1, 2012: 1,165,654
December 1, 2011: 1,112,876
November 1, 2011: 1,058,635
October 1, 2011: 1,033,611
September 1, 2011: 995,265 (roughly 40,000 removed one day: PLR?)
August 1, 2011: 1,015,056
July 1, 2011: 980,434
June 1, 2011: 974,841
May 1, 2011: 937,831
April 1, 2011: 897,663
March 1, 2011: 868,351
February 1, 2011: 828,708
January 1, 2011: 796,131
December 1, 2010: 768,865
November 1, 2010: 743,692
October 1, 2010: 714, 663
September 1, 2010: 687,246
August 1, 2010: 659,479
July 1 2010: 627,343
June 1 2010: 596,300
May 1 2010: 509,229
April 1 2010: 476,653
March 1 2010: 450,625
February 1 2010: 415,100
January 1 2010: 401,773
December 1 2009: 385,484
November 1 2009: 368,813
October 1 2009: 342,865
September 21 2009: 355,805
July 28 2009: 332,813
May 16 2009: 284,491

Approximate average of titles added per day:

August 1, 2014: 2,276
July 1, 2014: 1954
June 1, 2014: 655 (2nd run: 689)
May 1, 2014: 2,131
April 1, 2014: 1,603
March 1, 2014: 1,826
February 1, 2014: 1,949
January 1, 2014: 2,046
December 1, 2013: 1,995
November 1, 2013: 1,779
October 1, 2013: 3,135
September 1, 2013: 689
August 1, 2013: 1,991
July 1, 2013: 881
June 1, 2013: 1,032
May 1, 2013: 538
April 1, 2013: 354
March 1, 2013: 2,274
February 1, 2013: 1,435
January 1, 2013: 2,000
December 1, 2012: 3,388
November 1, 2012: 2,001
October 1, 2012: 1,609
September 1, 2012: 1,433
August 1, 2012: 1,134
July 1, 2012: 1,476
June 1, 2012: 1,558
May 1, 2012: 1,433
April 1, 2012: 1,622
March 1, 2012: 2,004
February 1, 2012: 1,351
January 1, 2012: 1,703
December 1, 2011: 1,808
November 1, 2011: 807
October 1, 2011: 1,278
September 1, 2011: -638
August 1, 2011: 1,117
July 1, 2011: 186
June 1, 2011: 1,194
May 1, 2011: 1,339
April 1, 2011: 946
March 1, 2011: 1,416 (corrected from last post)
February 1, 2011: 1,051
Taken January 1, 2011: 880 (average for December 2010)
December: 839
November:  968
October: 914
September: 896
August: 1,037
July: 1,035
May: 2,809 (may be affected by Penguin return)
April: 1,086
March: 840
February: 1,146
January: 430 (may be impacted by Macmillan removal)
December 2009: 525
November: 556
October: 837

Magazines:

August 1, 2014: 649
July 1, 2014: 650
June 1, 2014: 668
May 1, 2014: 671
April 1, 2014: 684
March 1, 2014: 671
February 1, 2014: 675
January 1, 2014: 670
December 1, 2013: 669
November 1, 2013: 653
October 1, 2013: 652
September 1, 2013: 630
August 1, 2013: 628
July 1, 2013: 628
June 1, 2013: 626
May 1, 2013: 620
April 1, 2013: 609
March 1, 2013: 605
February 1, 2013: 601
January 1, 2013: 586
December 1, 2012: 573
November 1, 2012: 567
October 1, 2012: 558
September 1, 2012: 547
August 1, 2012: 510
July 1, 2012: 497
June 1, 2012: 476
May 1, 2012: 469
April 1, 2012: 453
March 1, 2012: 430
February 1, 2012: 409
January 1, 2012: 370
December 1, 2011: 340
November 1, 2011: 132
October 1, 2011: 129
September 1, 2011: 127
August 1, 2011: 119
July 1, 2011: 115
June 1, 2011: 110
May 1, 2011: 93
April 1, 2011: 86
March 1, 2011: 81
February 1, 2011:  80
January 1, 2011: 74
December 1, 2010:  83
November 1, 2010: 84
October 1, 2010: 80
September 1. 2010: 70
August 1, 2010: 64
July 1, 2010: 61
June 1, 2010: 60
May 1, 2010: 58
April 1, 2010: 53
March 1, 2010: 50
February 1, 2010: 46
January 1, 2010: 43
December 1, 2009: 40
November 1, 2009: 38

Newspapers:

August 1, 2014: 174
July 1, 2014: 175
June 1, 2014: 177
May 1, 2014: 178
April 1, 2014: 175
March 1, 2014: 175
February 1, 2014: 176
January 1, 2014: 176
December 1, 2013: 179
November 1, 2013: 179
October 1, 2013: 181
September 1, 2013: 181
August 1, 2013: 181
July 1, 2013: 179
June 1, 2013: 180
May 1, 2013: 185
April 1, 2013: 181
March 1, 2013: 198
February 1, 2013: 201
January 1, 2013: 200
December 1, 2012: 198
November 1, 2012: 202
October 1, 2012: 200
September 1, 2012: 201
August 1, 2012: 204
July 1, 2012: 201
June 1, 2012: 199
May 1, 2012: 195
April 1, 2012: 194
March 1, 2012: 193
February 1, 2012: 190
January 1, 2012: 188
December 1, 2011: 211
November 1, 2011: 191
October 1, 2011: 184
September 1, 2011: 177
August 1, 2011: 176
July 1, 2011: 176
June 1, 2011: 169
May 1, 2011: 167
April 1, 2011: 164
March 1, 2011: 161
February 1, 2011:  156
January 1, 2011: 153
December 1, 2010: 148
November 1, 2010: 145
October 1, 2010: 144
September 1, 2010: 138
August 1, 2010: 135
July 1, 2010: 136
June 1, 2010: 133
May 1, 2010: 128
April 1, 2010: 118
March 1, 2010: 107
February 1, 2010: 93
January 1, 2010: 89
December 1, 2009: 76
November 1, 2009: 58

Blogs:

August 1, 2014: 14,089 (ILMK rank: #13)
July 1, 2014: 13,985 (ILMK rank: #13)
June 1, 2014: 13,924 (ILMK rank: #8)
May 1, 2014: 13,811 (ILMK rank: #10)
April 1, 2014: 14,525 (ILMK rank: #8)
March 1, 2014: 14,382
February 1, 2014: 14,221
January 1, 2014: 14,030
December 1, 2013: 13,867
November 1, 2013: 13,742
October 1, 2013: 13,521
September 1, 2013: 14,792
August 1, 2013: 14,555
July 1, 2013: 14,432
June 1, 2013: 14,157
May 1, 2013: 14,552
April 1, 2013: 14,234
March 1, 2013: 13,870
February 1, 2013: 13,461
January 1, 2013: 13,110
December 1, 2012: 13,559
November 1, 2012: 13,178
October 1, 2012: 12,908
September 1, 2012: 12,417
August 1, 2012: 12,087
July 1, 2012: 12,759
June 1, 2012: 12,680
May 1, 2012: 12,914
April 1, 2012: 13,295
March 1, 2012: 13,038
February 1, 2012: 13,984
January 1, 2012: 13,571
December 1, 2011: 13,178
November 1, 2011: 14,286
October 1, 2011: 15,116
September 1, 2011: 14,801
August 1, 2011: 14,477
July 1, 2011: 14,053
June 1, 2011: 13,616
May 1, 2011: 12,901
April 1, 2011: 12,502
March 1, 2011: 12,080
February 1, 2011: 11,355
January 1, 2011: 11,087
December 1, 2010: 10,585
November 1, 2010: 10,255
October 1, 2010: 10,056
September 1, 2010: 10,036
August 1, 2010: 9,716
July 1, 2010: 9,429
June 1, 2010: 9,228
May 1, 2010: 9,094
April 1, 2010: 8,944
March 1, 2010: 8,754
February 1, 2010: 8,651
January 1, 2010: 7,992
December 1, 2009: 7,589
November 1, 2009: 7,365

Percentage of books priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars

July 1, 2014 (taken August 1, 2014): 87.7% (2,232,131 of 2,544,623)
June, 2014 (taken July 1, 2014): 87.7% (2,172,079 of 2,477,343)
May, 2014 (taken June 1, 2014): 74.6% (294,759 of 395,137) | Second run (to account for possible Amazon glitching): 87.6% (2,121,022 of 2,422,630)
April, 2014 (taken May 1, 2014): 87.6% (2,106,603 of 2,404,221)
March, 2014 (taken April 1, 2014): 87.6% (2,054,771 of 2,346,730)
February, 2014 (taken March 1, 2014): 87.5% (2,012,504 of 2,300,490)
January, 2014 (taken February 1, 2014): 87.7% (1,976,453 of 2,254,215)
December, 2013 (taken January 1, 2014): 88.1% (1,932,395 of 2,193,346)
November (taken December 1, 2013): 88.0% (1,875,538 of 2,130,446)
October (taken November 1, 2013): 88.0% (1,823,817 of 2,073,157)
September (taken October 1, 2013):  87.7% (1,777,735 of 2,024,990)
August (taken September 1, 2013): 88.5% (1,706,130 of 1,928,837)
July (taken August 1, 2013): 87.9% (1,681,162 of 1,913,454)
June (taken July 1, 2013): 87.7% (1,627,666 of 1,855,614)
May (taken June 1, 2013): 87.8% (1,605,912 of 1,828,577)
April (taken May 1, 2013): 87.8% (1,582,685 of 1,801,844)
March (taken April 1, 2013): 88.1% (1,573,845 of 1,785,986)
February (taken March 1, 2013): 88.4% (1,564,429 of 1,770,452)
January (taken February 1, 2013): 89.6% (1,534,604 of 1,713,256)
December (taken January 1, 2013): 89.9% (1,502,267 of 1,671,220)
November (taken December 1): 89.8% (1,451,437 of 1,615,716)
October (taken November 1): 90.0% (1,371,227 of 1,522,810)
September (taken October 1): 90.1% (1,322,272 of 1,466,890)
August (taken September 1): 90.0% (1,278,733 of 1,421,168)
July (taken August 1): 89.9% (1,240,642 of 1,379,399)
June (taken (July 1): 89.7% (1,204,888 of 1,343,776)
May (taken June 1): 89.8% (1,1174,668 of 1,308,331)
April (taken May 1): 89.9% (1,113,793 of 1,261,606)
March (taken April 1): 89.6% (1,089,619 of 1,215,625)
February (taken March 1): 89.7% (1,044,889 of 1,165,368)
January (taken February 1): 89.4% (994,448 of 1,112,467)
December (taken January 1): 89.0% (955,187 of 1,073,539)
November (taken December 1): 88.8% (907,647 of 1,021,647)
October (taken November 1): 88.7% (859,492 of 968,948)
September (taken October 1): 88.6% (835,590 of 943,545)
August (taken September 1): 88.4% (803,271 of 908,602)
July (taken August 1): 89.1% (829,823 of 931,713)
June (taken July 1): 89.2% (801,631 of 898,735)
May (taken June 1): 89.4% (799,845 of 895,091)
April (taken May 1): 89.2% (769,798 of 862,970)
March (taken April 1): 88.9% (739,192 of 831,867)
February (taken March 1): 92.4% (752,043 of 814,009)
January (taken February 1): 88.9% (692,840 of 779,683)
December (taken January 1): 88.8% (663,315 of 746,963)
November (taken December 1): 88.8% (639,676 of 720,179)
October: (taken November 1): 88.8% (617,133 of 695,278)
September (taken October 1): 93.0% (589,877 of 634,375)
August: 88.2% (565,260 of 640,936)
July: 87.7% (522,046 of 595,370)
June: 87.1% (479,793 of 563,436)
May: 86.8% (462,359 of 532,646)
April: 84.8% (377,624 of 445,421)
March: 83.9% (413,302 of 346,665)
February: 84.2% (328,597 of 390,178)
January: 83.4% (295,634 of 354,499)
December: 83.1% (283,497 of 341,112)
November: 82.8% (268,366 of 324,230)
October: 82.2% (252,511 of 307,241)
September: 82.0% (239,666 of 292318)
August: 83.2% (245,524 of 295,210)

Percentage of books with a publication date of the previous month priced from one penny to $50 that are under ten dollars

Books for July, 2014: 95.8% (72,543 of 75,750)
Books for June, 2014: 94.4% (63,104 of 66,856)
Books for May, 2014: 81.4% (3,177 of 3,905)  | 2nd run to account for Amazon possibly glitching: 94.7% (65,080 of 68,713)
Books for April, 2014: 93.9% (64,320 of 68,534)
Books for March, 2014: 95.1% (64,614 of 67,969)
Books for February, 2014: 94.9% (60,313 of 63,555)
Books for January, 2014: 95.9% (95,399 of 99,439)
Books for December, 2013: 96.4% (105,488 of 109,437)
Books for November: 95.6% (95,064 of 99,468)
Books for October: 91.8% (58,291 of 63,498)
Books for September: 92.6% (55,613 of 60,082)
Books for August: 94.5% (55,159 of 58,358)
Books for July: 93.7% (55,648 of 59,365)
Books for June: 93.6% (52,745 of 56,323)
Books for May: 92.3% (51,237 of 55,482)
Books for April: 93.3% (53,929 of 57,818)
Books for March: 94.5% (53,632 of 56,758)
Books for February: 94.0% (48,876 of 52,015)
Books for January: 93.8% (50,100 of 53,418)
Books for December: 95.7% (49,147 of 51,337)
Books for November:  93.3% (47,702 of 51,103)
Books for October: 93.5% (48,869 of 52,243)
Books for September: 95.0% (52,571 of 49,491)
Books for August: 94.9% (45,180 of 47,593)
Books for July: 95.2% (46,712 of 49,072)
Books for June: 90.8% (50,056 of 55,143)
Books for May: 93.8% (44,463 of 47,396)
Books for April: 96.6% (45,211 of 46,800)
Books for March: 95.6% (48,578 of 50,788)
Books for February: 97.1% (51,180 of 52,734)
Books for January 2012: 96.9% (49,134 of 50,703)
Books for December: 96.8% (46,619 or 48,151)
Books for November: 96.0% (41,067 of 42,678)
Books for October: 96.2% (37,305 of 38,792)
Books for September 96.1% (33,889 of 35,254)
Books for August: 95.8% (37,440 of 39,100)
Books for July: 96.7% (42,922 of 44,400)
Books for June: 96.4% (45,332 of 47,018)
Books for May: 96.9% (51,840 of 53,484)
Books for April: 96.2% (42,795 of 44,464)
Books for March: 96.1% (38,961 of 40,558)
Books for February: 94.7% (32,379 of 34,206)
Books for January: 95.9% (29,010 of 30,260)
Books for December, 2010: 95.2% (23,419 of 24,593)
Books for November: 96.4% (28,189 of 29.251)
Books for October: 94.6% (22,005 of 23,268)
Books for September: 94.7% (22,338 of 23,592)
Books for August: 95.6% (24,514 of 25,638)
Books for July: 95.3% (24,375 of 25,579)
Books for June: 94.9% (21,774 of 22,945)
Books for May: 94.9% (24,436 of 25,737)
Books for April: 95.9% (23,695 of 24,714)
Books for March: 96.0% (23,703 of 24,699)
Books for February: 96.5% (26,850 of 27,815)
Books for January: 93.3% (11,857 of 12,704)
Books for December: 90.6% (8,948 of 9,879)
Books for November: 94.1% (11,520 of 12,239)
Books for October: 91.2% (6,789 of 7,445)
Books for September: 91.0% (5,104 of 5,608)
Books for August: 96.4% (20,239 of 21,079)

Books in the Seventy Percent Royalty Range ($2.99 – $9.99)

August 1, 2014: 63.6% (1,731,841 of 2,724,012)
July 1, 2014: 63.4% (1,684,876 of 2,655,727)
June 1, 2014: 8.7% (225,848 of 2,597,747) | second run to account for Amazon possibly glitching 63.4% (1,647,127 of 2,597,112)
May 1, 2014: 63.8% (1,644,029 of 2,576,453)
April 1, 2014: 63.9% (1,605,139 of 2,512,520)
March 1, 2014: 64.1% (1,577,451 of 2,462,832)
February 1, 2014: 64.2% (1,548,131 of 2,411,705)
January 1, 2014: 64.5% (1,516,854 of 2,351,290)
December 1, 2013: 64.5% (1,474,801 of 2,287,866)
November 1, 2013: 64.5% (1,438,413 of 2,229,223)
October 1, 2013: 64.6% (1,405,220 of 2,175,847)
September 1, 2013: 64.5% (1,342,522 of 2,081,800)
August 1, 2013: 64.4% (1,327,280 of 2,060,431)
July 1, 2013: 64.5% (1,288,838 of 1,998,705)
June 1, 2013: 65.0% (1,282,211 of  1,972,277)
May 1, 2013: 65.0% (1,261,991 of 1,940,274)
April 1, 2013: 65.7% (1,264,685 of 1,924,138)
March 1, 2013: 66.2% (1,265,680 of 1,913,164)
February 1, 2013: 67.4% (1,247,401 of 1,849,479)
January 1, 2013: 67.8% (1,224,368 of 1,805,001)
December 1, 2012: 67.9% (1,183,346 of 1,742,991)
November 1, 2012: 64.7% (1,061,871 of 1,641,362)
October 1, 2012: 61.4% (969,791 of 1,579,329)
September 1, 2012: 60.4% (924,771 of 1,531,069)
August 1, 2012: 59.4% (883,612 of 1,486,649)
July 1: 61.3% (890,148 of 1,451,504)
June 1:  62.1% (874,145 of 1,407,210)
May 1: 62.6% (850,030 of  1,358,922)
April 1: 66.8% (812,423 of 1,215,625)
March 1: 61.1% (773,783 of 1,265,632)
February 1: 60.5% (731,051 of 1,207,522)
January 1, 2012: 61.6% (718,191 of 1,165,654)
December 1: 62.5% (694,766 of 1,112,876)
November 1: 61.8% (653,971 of 1,058,635)
October 1: 64.6% (667,521 of 1,033,611)
September 1: 65.8% (654,521 of 995,265)
August 1: 66.8% (677,646 of 1,015,056)
July 1: 63.5% (622,648 of 980,434)
June 1: 65.8% (641,867 of 974,841)
May 1: 67.4% (631,871 of 937,831)
April 1: 67.5% (606,223 of 897,663)
March 1: 68.2% (592,077 of 868,351)
February 1: 67.7% (561,035 of 828,708)
January 1: 66.8% (532,092 of 796,131)
December 1, 2010: 66.9% (514,086 of 768,865)
November 1: 66.7% (493,644 of 743,692)
October 1: 68.2% (487,833 of 714,863)
September 1:  66% (453,408 of 687,246)
August 1: 58% (382,691 of 659,479)
July 1: 57.3% (359,361 of 627,343)
June 1: 57.1% (340,379 of 596,300)
May 1: 51.4% (261,869 of 509,229)
April 1: 51.1% (243,718 of 476,653)
March 1: 52.5% (236,418 of 450,625)
February 1: 50.8% (210,978 of 415,100)

Books from one penny to $2.98

August 1, 2014: 18.9% (513,541 of 2,724,012)
July 1, 2014: 18.8% (499,756 of 2,655,727)
June 1, 2014: 2.7% (70,679 of 2,596,747) | second run to account for Amazon possibly glitching: 18.7% (485,799 of 2,597,112)
May 1, 2014: 18.4% (474,202 of 2,576,453
April 1, 2014: 18.4% (461,344 of 2,512,520)
March 1, 2014: 18.1% (446,248 of 2,462,382)
February 1, 2014: 18.2% (439,217 of 2,411,705)
January 1, 2014: 18.1% (426,107 of 2,351,290)
December 1, 2013: 18.0% (410,936 of 2,287,866)
November 1, 2013: 17.8% (395,739 of 2,229,223)
October 1, 2013: 17.6% (381,972 of 2,175,847)
September 1, 2013: 17.9% (372,207 of 2,081,800)
August 1, 2013: 17.5% (361,079 of 2,060,431)
July 1, 2013: 17.3% (346,301 of 1,998,705)
June 1, 2013: 16.8% (330,723 of 1,972,277)
May 1, 2013: 16.9% (326,947 of 1,940,274)
April 1, 2013: 16.4% (315,280 of 1,924,138)
March 1, 2013: 15.9% (304,800 of 1,913,164)
February 1, 2013: 15.8% (293,041 of 1,849,479)
January 1, 2013: 15.7% (283,545 of 1,805,001)
December 1, 2012: 15.5% (270,520 of 1,742,991)
November 1, 2012: 19.2% (315,137 of 1,641,362)
October 1, 2012: 22.7% (358,015 of 1,579,329)
September 1, 2012: 23.5% (359,257 of 1,531,069)
August 1, 2012: 24.3% (361,675 of 1,486,649)
July 1: 22.0% (319,951 of 1,451,504)
June 1:  21.7% (305,794 of 1,407,210)
May 1: 21.3% (288,796 of  1,368,922)
April 1: 23.2% (282,254 of 1,215,625)
March 1: 21.8% (275,556 of 1,265,632)
February 1: 22.2% (268,203 of 1,207,522)
January 1, 2012: 20.7% (241,553 of 1,165,654)
December 1: 19.5% (217,026 of 1,112,876)
November 1: 19.8% (209,435 of 1,058,635)
October 1: 16.7% (172,745 of 1,033,611)
September 1: 15.5% (153,891 of 995,265)
August 1: 15.6% (158,010 of 1,015,056)
July 1: 18.9% (185,041 of 980,434)
June 1: 17.0% (165,687 of 974,841)
May 1: 15.6% (146,540 of 937,831)
April 1: 16.2% (145,638 of 897,863)
March 1: 16.9% (147,076 of 868,351)
February 1: 18.1% (149,809 of 828,708)
January 1: 18.7% (148,681 of 796,131)
December 1, 2010: 18.5%  (142,549 of 768,865)
November 1: 18.4% (136,964 of 743,692)
October 1: 17.9% (127,830 of 714,863)
September 1: 18.5% (127,165 of 687,246)
August 1: 21.1% (139,277 of 659,479)
July 1: 21% (131,432 of 627,343)
June 1: 20.5% (121,981 of 596,300)
May 1: 22.7% (115,756 of 509,229)
April 1: 21.6% (102,948 of 476,653)
March 1: 20.5% (92,180 of 450,625)
February 1: 20.4% (84,721 of 415,100)

Price Point Analysis of New York Times Hardback Fiction Equivalents

August 1, 2014

8.99 8.99 10.99 11.99 11.84 6.99 11.99 10.99 10.99 10.99
10.99 8.52 12.99 14.99 10.99 N/A 12.74 10.99 10.99 9.99

Average: $10.95 (+$0.30) 5 titles under $10

July 1, 2014

11.84 8.99 11.99 11.99 10.99 6.99 11.99 11.84 12.99 10.49
10.99 7.99 11.99 10.99 7.99 11.99 5.99 11.84 12.99 9.99

Average: $10.64 (+$0.22) 6 titles under $10

June 1, 2014

8.99 7.50 8.99 8.99 12.99 10.99 10.99 9.99 10.99 14.44
10.99 10.99 9.99 11.84 10.99 8.99 11.84 10.99 5.99 10.99

Average: $10.42 (-$0.16) 8 titles under $10

May 1, 2014

10.99 11.04 10.99 7.50 8.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 12.99
11.04 5.99 10.99 9.10 12.99 8.55 10.99 13.99 9.99 9.45

Average: $10.58 (-$0.27) 7 titles under $10

April 1, 2014

11.84 10.99 12.74 10.99 10.99 7.50 10.99 11.99 11.99 11.47
10.99 10.65 6.49 10.99 10.99 11.99 12.99 5.99 15.49 8.99

Average: $10.85 (+$0.59) 3 titles under $10

March 1, 2014

11.99 11.99 7.50 10.91 12.74 10.65 10.65 11.48 6.49 11.47
9.99 8.99 11.99 8.49 12.99 N/A 5.99 10.99 8.99 10.66

Average: $10.26 (+$1.33) 7 titles under $10

February 1, 2014

10.91 7.50 10.65 10.65 6.59 10.65 11.19 8.49 10.91 10.65
5.99 8.99 7.50 11.39 7.50 8.99 10.65 6.49 6.49 6.49

Average: $8.93 (+$0.99) 11 titles under $10

January 1, 2014

6.49 8.49 7.50 6.06 7.99 7.50 6.49 6.49 6.49 8.99
11.39 6.49 6.49 N/A 8.59 8.99 11.39 6.49 11.49 6.99

Average: $7.94 (-$1.06) 16 titles under $10

December 1, 2013:

8.49 3.29 10.99 10.65 7.99 7.49 11.99 3.99 10.99 10.99

N/A 10.99 8.99 7.99 8.59 10.91 10.65 10.99 3.99 11.99

Average: $9.00 ($-1.48) 9 titles under $10

November 1, 2013:

10.99 10.91 10.91 11.99 10.91 10.99 10.99 11.99 10.99 6.50

10.91 10.91 10.91 10.65 9.99 10.99 10.99 9.01 9.99 7.99

Average: $10.48

October 1, 2013:

10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 9.99 9.45 5.99 10.99

10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 10.99 5.99 9.99 12.8010.99 10.99

Average: $10.40

September 4, 2013:

6.50 10.99 11.99 10.99 11.04 10.99 4.99 10.99 10.99 6.50
9.00 8.00 11.99 10.99 7.48 10.67 11.99 11.99 10.99 12.60

Average: $10.08

August 1, 2013:

11.99 12.99 9.99 12.99 11.99 10.99 9.99 12.99 9.99 9.99

12.99 12.99 11.04 12.99 8.52 12.99 14.99 10.91 11.04 11.84

Average: $11.71

July 1, 2013:

7.99 12.99 11.04 12.99 12.99 11.04 11.04 7.99 11.04 11.04

12.99 12.99 7.99 7.49 11.04 14.99 7.49 12.99 10.99 12.74

Average: $11.09

June 1, 2013:

12.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 8.99 12.99 13.99 12.99 12.99 9.00

14.99 12.99 9.99 9.99 10.99 14.99 10.99 12.80 9.68 12.99

Average: $12.12

May 1, 2013:

12.99 10.99 12.74 12.99 7.99 12.99 10.99 12.99 12.99 12.99
12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 10.99 10.99 12.99 7.49 14.99 12.59

Average: $12.23

April 1, 2013:

12.74 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 9.45
11.99 14.99 14.99 9.68 12.99 12.99 12.99 9.78 11.04 10.67

Average: $12.36

March 1, 2013:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 N/A 10.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99
12.74 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99

Average: $12.92

February 1, 2013:

N/A 12.99 12.74 12.99 9.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 11.04 12.99

9.99 8.00 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 13.59

Average: $12.38

January 1, 2013:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 11.04 11.04 12.74 11.43 12.74 12.99

11.99 9.99 12.99 7.50 12.99 8.00 19.99 13.49 13.99 14.99

Average: 12.49

December 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 11.99

12.99 12.99 19.99 9.50 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

Average: $13.22

November 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 19.99 12.99 9.50 12.99

11.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99 13.99 14.99 12.80 11.99 12.99

Average: $13.26

October 1, 2012:

19.99 12.99 12.99 9.50 12.99 12.99 9.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 11.99 9.45 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99

Average: $12.84

September 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

12.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 9.99 14.99 12.99 14.99 1.99

Average: $12.49

August 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99

12.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

Average: $13.04

July 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 14.99 12.99 12.99

Average: 13.29

June 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 11.99

12.99 9.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 11.99 12.99 14.99

Average: $12.94

May 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 11.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

Average: $13.04

April 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

14.99* 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 11.9912.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

Average: $13.14

March 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99* 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

9.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

$13.04

February 1, 2012:

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99* 12.99 9.99 12.99 12.99

12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 12.99 14.99 12.99 12.99 12.99

Average: $13.04

* There was also an enhanced audio/visual version of this book for $16.99. I chose to enter it here only in the standard version, since that most closely represents the comparison between paper and e-book versions. It isn’t necessary to pay $16.99: it’s an additional payment for more features

January 1, 2012

Average: $13.14

December 1, 2011

Average: $12.40

November 1, 2011:

Average: $12.45

October 1, 2011:

Avg: $13.09

September 1, 2011:

Avg: 12.99

August 1, 2011:

Avg $13.29

July 1, 2011

Avg $13.09

June 1, 2011

Avg: $12.81

May 1, 2011

Average: $12.84

April 1, 2011

Average: $12.69

March 1, 2011

Average: $12.83

February 1, 2011

Average: $12.25
Agency Model average: $12.86
Non-Agency Model average: $9.99

January 1, 2011

Average: $12.52

Agency Model: $12.99

Non-Agency: $9.99

December 1, 2010:

Average: $12.78
Agency Model average: $13.52
Non-Agency Model average: $9.99

November 1, 2010:

Average: $12.83
Agency Model average: $13.59
Non-Agency Model average: $9.99

October 1, 2010:

Average: $12.38
Agency Model average: $12.79
Non-Agency Model average: $10.87

September 1, 2010:

Average: $12.52
Agency Model average $12.99
Non-Agency Model average $9.99

Textbooks in the Kindle Store

August 1, 2014: 42,643
July 1, 2014: 42,114
June 1, 2014: 40,810
May 1, 2014: 39,687
April 1, 2014: 38,577
March 1, 2014: 37,212
February 1, 2014: 36,397
January 1, 2014: 35,793
December 1, 2013: 35,213
November 1, 2013: 35,273
October 1, 2013: 34,585
September 1, 2013:  30,925
August 1, 2013: 29,956
July 1, 2013: 29,070
June 1, 2013: 28,194
May 1, 2013: 27,110
April 1, 2013: 26,35
March 1, 2013: 26,100
February 1, 2013: 25,000
January 1, 2013: 23,256
December 1, 2012: 21,507
November 1, 2012: 19,796
October 1, 2012: 19,095
September 1, 2012: 18,369
August 1, 2012: 17,756
July 1, 2012: 24,629
June 1, 2012: 15,581
May 1, 2012: 14,868
April 1, 2012: 16,509
March 1, 2012: 15,434
February 1, 2012: 14,827
January 1, 2012: 13,828
December 1, 2011: 13,396
November 1, 2011: 13,131
October 1, 2011: 12,788
September 1, 2011: 11,966
August 1, 2011: 10,316
July 1, 2011: 9,852
June 1, 2011: 9,442
May 1, 2011: 9,193
April 1, 2011:  8,952
March 1, 2011: 8,633
February 1, 2011: 8,342
January 1, 2011: 7,926
December 1, 2010: 7,637
November 1, 2010: 7,355
October 1, 2010: 7, 162
September 1, 2010: 6,831
August 1, 2010: 6,661
July 1, 2010: 6,481
June 1, 2010: 6,249
May 1, 2010: 6,117
April 1, 2010: 5,973
March 1, 2010: 5,728
February 1, 2010: 5,673
January 1, 2010: 5,549
December 1, 2009: 4,892
November 1, 2009: 4,768
October 1, 2009: 4,633
September 24, 2009: 4,678
August 11, 2009: 4,381

Free books (including public domain)

August 1, 2014: 61,381
July 1, 2014: 60,103
June 1, 2014: 59,848
May 1, 2014: 59,957
April 1, 2014: 57,945
March 1, 2014: 58,588
February 1, 2014: 57,648
January 1, 2014: 56,793
December 1, 2013: 57,311
November 1, 2013: 58,238
October 1, 2013: 56,199
September 1, 2013: 57,547
August 1, 2013: 56,113
July 1, 2013: 55,068
June 1, 2013: 55,811
May 1, 2013: 54,033
April 1, 2013: 55,670
March 1, 2013: 54,946
February 1, 2013: 54,567
January 1, 2013: 54,538
December 1, 2012: 50,869
November 1, 2012: 50,938
October 1, 2012: 50,982
September 1, 2012: 52,601
August 1, 2012: 51,680
July 1: 53,728
June 1: 50,470
May 1: 48,904
April 1: 49,826
March 1: 51,860
February 1: 48,207
January 1, 2012: 46,201
December 1: 43,757
November 1: 42,657
October 1, 2011: 42,710
September 1, 2011: 39,540
August 1, 2011: 38,936
July 1, 2011: 38,627
June 1, 2011: 37,415
May 1, 2011: 36,481
April 1, 2011: 33,469
March 1, 2011: 15,931
February 1, 2011: 15,947
January 1, 2011: 16,758
December 1, 2010: 16,708
November 1, 2010: 16,703
October 1, 2010: 16,702
September 1, 2010: 16,726
August 1, 2010: 20,634
July 1, 2010: 20,628
June 1, 2010: 20,590
May 1, 2010: 20,601
April 1, 2010: 20,619
March 1, 2010: 20,143
February 1, 2010: 19788
January 1, 2010: 19,802
December 1, 2009: 19,895
November 1, 2009: 18,547
October 1, 2009: 7,428
February 28, 2009: 7,401

Free books (without public domain)

August 1, 2014: 14,717
July 1, 2014: 13,300
June 1, 2014: 12,490
May 1, 2014: 13,191
April 1, 2014: 11,864
March 1, 2014: 12,500
February 1, 2014: 11,568
January 1, 2014: 11,091
December 1, 2013: 11,455
November 1, 2013: 11,262
October 1, 2013: 9,726
September 1, 2013: 10,794
August 1, 2013: 9,816
July 1, 2013: 8,921
June 1, 2013: 9,582
May 1, 2013: 7,807
April 1, 2013: 7,761
March 1, 2013: 7,710
February 1, 2013: 7,404
January 1, 2013: 7,261
December 1, 2012: 7,089
November 1, 2012: 7,186
October 1, 2012: 7,259
September 1, 2012: 8,701
August 1, 2012: 7,829
July 1, 2012: 9,660
June 1, 2012: 6,715
May 1, 2012: 5,195
April 1, 2012: 5,622
March 1, 2012: 8,356
February 1, 2012: 6,109
January 1, 2012: 4,102
December 1, 2011: 2,007
November 1, 2011: 1,681
October 1, 2011: 1,449
September 1, 2011: 1,283
August 1, 2011: 1,046
July 1, 2011: 883
June 1, 2011: 707
May 1, 2011: 20,984
April 1, 2011: 17,832
March 1, 2011: 241
February 1, 2011: 240
January 1, 2011: 230
December 1, 2010: 183
November 1, 2010: 171
October 1, 2010: 161
September 1, 2010: 143
August 1, 2010: 621 (125 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
July 1, 2010: 599 (102 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
June 1, 2010: 559 (63 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
May 1, 2010: 556 (57 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
April 1, 2010: 560 (59 without Amazon Breakthrough nominees)
March 1, 2010: 67
February 1, 2010: 52
January 1, 2010: 53
December 1, 2009: 84
November 1, 2009: 64
October 1, 2009: 67

Spanish edition books*

August 1, 2014: 101,643
July 1, 2014: 98,048
June 1, 2014: 95,632
May 1, 2014: 92,954
April 1, 2014: 90,187
March 1, 2014: 87,752
February 1, 2014: 86,182
January 1, 2014: 83,041
December 1, 2013: 80,061
November 1, 2013: 77,688
October 1, 2013: 76,079
September 1, 2013: 73,649
August 1, 2013: 71,335
July 1, 2013: 68,643
June 1, 2013: 66,070
May 1, 2013: 63,842
April 1, 2013: 61,264
March 1, 2013: 54,839
February 1, 2013: 52,638
January 1, 2013: 51,302
December 1, 2012: 48,905
November 1, 2012: 46,790
October 1, 2012: 44,232
September 1, 2012: 41,659
August 1, 2012: 40,214
July 1, 2012: 38,684
June 1, 2012: 36,891
May 1, 2012: 34,308
April 1, 2012: 32,157
March 1, 2012: 29,480
February 1, 2012: 22,834
January 1, 2012: 22,492
December 1, 2011: 19,928
November 1, 2011: 15,758
October 1, 2011: 16,874
September 1, 2011: 14,805
August 1, 2011: 11,383
July 1, 2011: 10,552
June 1, 2011: 9,917
May 1, 2011: 9,251
April 1, 2011: 8,362
March 1, 2011: 9,244
February 1, 2011: 8,608
January 1, 2011: 8.045
December 1, 2010: 5,839
November 1, 2010: 5,286
October 1, 2010: 4,982
September 1, 2010: 4,723
August 1, 2010: 4,623
July 1, 2010: 4,398
June 1, 2010: 4,078
May 1, 2010: 3,735
April 1, 2010: 3,383
March 1, 2010: 2,841
February 1, 2010: 2,548
January 1, 2010: 2,363
December 1, 2009: 3,483

Books in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL)

August 1, 2014: 638,545 (23.4%)
July 1, 2014: 604,950 (22.8%)
June 1, 2014: 586,812 (22.6%)
May 1, 2014: 566,893 (22.0%)
April 1, 2014: 547,360 (21.8%)
March 1, 2014: 529,466 (21.5%)
February 1, 2014: 512,403 (21.2%)
January 1, 2014: 491,875 (20.91%)
December 1, 2013: 469,593 (20.53%)
November 1, 2013: 447,147 (20.06%)
October 1, 2013: 428,318 (19.7%)
September 1, 2013: 408,514 (19.8%)
August 1, 2013: 389,380 (18.9%)
July 1, 2013: 369,622 (18.5%)
June 1, 2013: 352,649 (17.1%)
May 1, 2013: 336,351 (17.3%)
April 1, 2013: 319,676 (16.6%)
March 1, 2013: 302,080 (15.8%)
February 1, 2013: 283,641 (15.3%)
January 1, 2013: 264,444
December 1, 2012: 242,716
November 1, 2012: 235,957
October 1, 2012: 216,873
September 1, 2012: 198,009
August 1, 2012: 180,133
July 1, 2012: 168,440
June 1, 2012: 159,937
May 1, 2012: 146,182
April 1, 2012: 131,110
March 1, 2012: 117,652
February 1, 2012: 95,020
January 1, 2012: 69,850 (new measurement)

Books in Kindle Unlimited

August 1, 2014: 661,111 (new measurement)

Books in the Kindle Matchbook program

August 1, 2014: 68,453 (+1%)
July 1, 2014: 67,466 (-1%)
June 1, 2014: 67,787 (-1%)
May 1, 2014: 68,240 (-16%)
April 1, 2014: 81,560 (-27%)
March 1, 2014: 112,354 (+2%)
February 1, 2014: 109,992 (+8%)
January 1, 2014: 101,699 (+14%)
December 1, 2013: 88,869 (+18%)
November 1, 2013: 75,173 (new measurement)

Price Point Analysis

April 1, 2010 was “Agency Day”, when the pricing system for some of the largest trade publishers in the US changed. I’ve started tracking price points, to see how that is affecting things. These are not ranges: it’s how many books are at a specific price point.

4/1/2010
Total 476653
Prime 413032
Under $10 346665
83.9%
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$ 0.99 43,993 9.17% 0.01%
$ 1.99 7,704 1.61% 0.00%
$ 2.99 14,560 3.03% 0.00%
$ 3.99 17,390 3.62% -0.02%
$ 4.99 9,758 2.03% -0.01%
$ 5.99 2,691 0.56% 0.00%
$ 6.99 1,800 0.38% 0.00%
$ 7.99 10,927 2.28% -0.25%
$ 8.99 1,312 0.27% 0.00%
$ 9.99 51,857 10.80% -0.26%
$ 10.99 191 0.04% 0.00%
$ 11.99 196 0.04% 0.00%
$ 12.99 308 0.06% 0.00%
$ 13.99 93 0.02% 0.00%
$ 14.99 806 0.17% 0.00%
$ 15.99 114 0.02% 0.00%
$ 16.99 67 0.01% 0.00%
$ 17.99 43 0.01% 0.00%
$ 18.99 21 0.00% 0.00%
$ 19.99 201 0.04% 0.00%
$ 20.99 11 0.00% 0.00%
$ 21.99 11 0.00% 0.00%
$ 22.99 21 0.00% 0.00%
$ 23.99 5 0.00% 0.00%
$ 24.99 50 0.01% 0.00%

4/1/2011
Total 897,663
Prime 831,867
Under $10 739192
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$    0.99     71,036 7.91% -0.84%
$    1.99     15,994 1.78% 0.06%
$    2.99     50,033 5.57% 0.30%
$    3.99     23,986 2.67% 0.24%
$    4.99     20,374 2.27% 0.48%
$    5.99     10,560 1.18% 0.16%
$    6.99      7,422 0.83% 0.07%
$    7.99     18,354 2.04% 0.20%
$    8.99      4,436 0.49% -0.04%
$    9.99     96,211 10.72% 0.88%
$   10.99         766 0.09% 0.02%
$   11.99      1,383 0.15% -0.01%
$   12.99      2,122 0.24% 0.01%
$   13.99         506 0.06% 0.00%
$   14.99      1,519 0.17% -0.01%
$   15.99         172 0.02% 0.01%
$   16.99         225 0.03% 0.00%
$   17.99         403 0.04% 0.02%
$   18.99         199 0.02% 0.01%
$   19.99         568 0.06% -0.01%
$   20.99           45 0.01% 0.00%
$   21.99         152 0.02% 0.00%
$   22.99           21 0.00% 0.00%
$   23.99           22 0.00% 0.00%
$   24.99         104 0.01% -0.04%

5/1/2011
Total 937,831
Prime 862,970
Under $10 769,798
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99     74,929 7.99% 0.08%
$        1.99     16,497 1.76% -0.02%
$        2.99     56,878 6.06% 0.49%
$        3.99     22,937 2.45% -0.23%
$        4.99     24,880 2.65% 0.38%
$        5.99     13,387 1.43% 0.25%
$        6.99      5,215 0.56% -0.27%
$        7.99     18,992 2.03% -0.02%
$        8.99      5,053 0.54% 0.04%
$        9.99   103,463 11.03% 0.31%
$      10.99         865 0.09% 0.01%
$      11.99      1,412 0.15% 0.00%
$      12.99      2,271 0.24% 0.01%
$      13.99         490 0.05% 0.00%
$      14.99      1,577 0.17% 0.00%
$      15.99         134 0.01% 0.00%
$      16.99         235 0.03% 0.00%
$      17.99         471 0.05% 0.01%
$      18.99         207 0.02% 0.00%
$      19.99         465 0.05% -0.01%
$      20.99           29 0.00% 0.00%
$      21.99         172 0.02% 0.00%
$      22.99           34 0.00% 0.00%
$      23.99           79 0.01% 0.01%
$      24.99         110 0.01% 0.00%

6/1/2011
Total 974,841
Prime 895,091
Under $10 799,845
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99    81,095 8.32% 0.33%
$        1.99    16,628 1.71% -0.05%
$        2.99    54,630 5.60% -0.46%
$        3.99    22,026 2.26% -0.19%
$        4.99    18,976 1.95% -0.71%
$        5.99    10,685 1.10% -0.33%
$        6.99      7,039 0.72% 0.17%
$        7.99    15,841 1.62% -0.40%
$        8.99      4,226 0.43% -0.11%
$        9.99    90,005 9.23% -1.80%
$      10.99        619 0.06% -0.03%
$      11.99      1,481 0.15% 0.00%
$      12.99      2,112 0.22% -0.03%
$      13.99        571 0.06% 0.01%
$      14.99      1,720 0.18% 0.01%
$      15.99        176 0.02% 0.00%
$      16.99        230 0.02% 0.00%
$      17.99        251 0.03% -0.02%
$      18.99        178 0.02% 0.00%
$      19.99        468 0.05% 0.00%
$      20.99          25 0.00% 0.00%
$      21.99        200 0.02% 0.00%
$      22.99          29 0.00% 0.00%
$      23.99          59 0.01% 0.00%
$      24.99        121 0.01% 0.00%

July 1, 2011

7/1/2011
Total 980,434
Prime 898,735
Under $10 801,631
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 73,957 7.54% -0.78%
$        1.99 18,207 1.86% 0.15%
$        2.99 34,414 3.51% -2.09%
$        3.99 26,942 2.75% 0.49%
$        4.99    8,926 0.91% -1.04%
$        5.99    5,117 0.52% -0.57%
$        6.99    3,725 0.38% -0.34%
$        7.99 14,537 1.48% -0.14%
$        8.99    2,009 0.20% -0.23%
$        9.99 79,377 8.10% -1.14%
$      10.99       491 0.05% -0.01%
$      11.99    1,574 0.16% 0.01%
$      12.99    1,863 0.19% -0.03%
$      13.99       509 0.05% -0.01%
$      14.99    1,555 0.16% -0.02%
$      15.99       453 0.05% 0.03%
$      16.99       201 0.02% 0.00%
$      17.99       138 0.01% -0.01%
$      18.99       118 0.01% -0.01%
$      19.99       271 0.03% -0.02%
$      20.99        18 0.00% 0.00%
$      21.99       186 0.02% 0.00%
$      22.99        32 0.00% 0.00%
$      23.99       111 0.01% 0.01%
$      24.99       125 0.01% 0.00%

August 1, 2011

8/1/2011
Total 1,015,056
Prime 931,713
Under $10 829,823
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$    0.99     76,233 7.51% -0.03%
$    1.99     17,083 1.68% -0.17%
$    2.99     66,967 6.60% 3.09%
$    3.99     12,921 1.27% -1.48%
$    4.99     27,893 2.75% 1.84%
$    5.99     12,894 1.27% 0.75%
$    6.99      2,715 0.27% -0.11%
$    7.99     18,431 1.82% 0.33%
$    8.99      5,638 0.56% 0.35%
$    9.99   111,705 11.00% 2.91%
$   10.99         473 0.05% 0.00%
$   11.99      1,691 0.17% 0.01%
$   12.99      2,129 0.21% 0.02%
$   13.99         576 0.06% 0.00%
$   14.99      1,768 0.17% 0.02%
$   15.99         252 0.02% -0.02%
$   16.99         230 0.02% 0.00%
$   17.99         128 0.01% 0.00%
$   18.99         249 0.02% 0.01%
$   19.99         468 0.05% 0.02%
$   20.99           46 0.00% 0.00%
$   21.99         166 0.02% 0.00%
$   22.99           64 0.01% 0.00%
$   23.99           90 0.01% 0.00%
$   24.99           59 0.01% -0.01%

September 1, 2011

9/1/2011
Total 995,265
Prime 908,602
Under $10 803,271
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$    0.99     77,793 7.82% 0.31%
$    1.99     16,614 1.67% -0.01%
$    2.99 56,503 5.68% -0.92%
$    3.99     21,995 2.21% 0.94%
$    4.99     21,595 2.17% -0.58%
$    5.99     11,312 1.14% -0.13%
$    6.99      7,477 0.75% 0.48%
$    7.99     16,948 1.70% -0.11%
$    8.99     14,883 1.50% 0.94%
$    9.99   102,626 10.31% -0.69%
$   10.99         485 0.05% 0.00%
$   11.99         983 0.10% -0.07%
$   12.99      1,374 0.14% -0.07%
$   13.99         316 0.03% -0.02%
$   14.99      1,501 0.15% -0.02%
$   15.99         160 0.02% -0.01%
$   16.99         159 0.02% -0.01%
$   17.99         285 0.03% 0.02%
$   18.99         165 0.02% -0.01%
$   19.99         446 0.04% 0.00%
$   20.99           50 0.01% 0.00%
$   21.99         171 0.02% 0.00%
$   22.99           41 0.00% 0.00%
$   23.99           33 0.00% -0.01%
$   24.99         109 0.01% 0.01%

10/1/2011
Total  1,033,611
Prime 943,545
Under $10 835,590
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99       81,946 7.93% 0.11%
 $        1.99       16,172 1.56% -0.10%
 $        2.99 48,287 4.67% -1.01%
 $        3.99       16,808 1.63% -0.58%
 $        4.99       17,389 1.68% -0.49%
 $        5.99        8,259 0.80% -0.34%
 $        6.99        5,300 0.51% -0.24%
 $        7.99       10,833 1.05% -0.65%
 $        8.99       12,478 1.21% -0.29%
 $        9.99       89,175 8.63% -1.68%
 $      10.99           395 0.04% -0.01%
 $      11.99           804 0.08% -0.02%
 $      12.99        1,285 0.12% -0.01%
 $      13.99           302 0.03% 0.00%
 $      14.99        1,386 0.13% -0.02%
 $      15.99           146 0.01% 0.00%
 $      16.99           151 0.01% 0.00%
 $      17.99           144 0.01% -0.01%
 $      18.99             75 0.01% -0.01%
 $      19.99           368 0.04% -0.01%
 $      20.99             22 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99           150 0.01% 0.00%
 $      22.99             26 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99             35 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99             66 0.01% 0.00%

11/1/2011
Total  1,058,635
Prime 968,948
Under $10 859,492
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99       84,612 7.99% 0.06%
 $    1.99        7,659 0.72% -0.84%
 $    2.99 19,157 1.81% -2.86%
 $    3.99       10,245 0.97% -0.66%
 $    4.99        7,451 0.70% -0.98%
 $    5.99        3,026 0.29% -0.51%
 $    6.99        2,533 0.24% -0.27%
 $    7.99        8,414 0.79% -0.25%
 $    8.99       11,882 1.12% -0.08%
 $    9.99       70,312 6.64% -1.99%
 $   10.99           348 0.03% -0.01%
 $   11.99        1,144 0.11% 0.03%
 $   12.99        1,068 0.10% -0.02%
 $   13.99           280 0.03% 0.00%
 $   14.99        1,171 0.11% -0.02%
 $   15.99 69 0.01% -0.01%
 $   16.99           118 0.01% 0.00%
 $   17.99           116 0.01% 0.00%
 $   18.99             59 0.01% 0.00%
 $   19.99           234 0.02% -0.01%
 $   20.99             33 0.00% 0.00%
 $   21.99           153 0.01% 0.00%
 $   22.99             29 0.00% 0.00%
 $   23.99             28 0.00% 0.00%
 $   24.99             89 0.01% 0.00%

12/1/2011
Total 1,112,876
Prime 1021677
Under $10 907,647
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99       90,203 8.11% 0.11%
 $    1.99       17,711 1.59% 0.87%
 $    2.99 29,634 2.66% 0.85%
 $    3.99       23,617 2.12% 1.15%
 $    4.99       23,320 2.10% 1.39%
 $    5.99        4,606 0.41% 0.13%
 $    6.99        4,887 0.44% 0.20%
 $    7.99       13,241 1.19% 0.40%
 $    8.99       10,646 0.96% -0.17%
 $    9.99       71,709 6.44% -0.20%
 $   10.99           466 0.04% 0.01%
 $   11.99           598 0.05% -0.05%
 $   12.99        1,038 0.09% -0.01%
 $   13.99           317 0.03% 0.00%
 $   14.99        1,234 0.11% 0.00%
 $   15.99 78 0.01% 0.00%
 $   16.99           109 0.01% 0.00%
 $   17.99           132 0.01% 0.00%
 $   18.99             50 0.00% 0.00%
 $   19.99           278 0.02% 0.00%
 $   20.99             25 0.00% 0.00%
 $   21.99           168 0.02% 0.00%
 $   22.99             31 0.00% 0.00%
 $   23.99             25 0.00% 0.00%
 $   24.99           104 0.01% 0.00%

1/1/2012
Total 1,165,654
Prime 1073539
Under $10 955,187
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99     99,225 8.51% 0.41%
 $        1.99     16,088 1.38% -0.21%
 $        2.99 38,295 3.29% 0.62%
 $        3.99     24,602 2.11% -0.01%
 $        4.99     18,289 1.57% -0.53%
 $        5.99      4,438 0.38% -0.03%
 $        6.99      5,002 0.43% -0.01%
 $        7.99     11,495 0.99% -0.20%
 $        8.99     12,412 1.06% 0.11%
 $        9.99     68,467 5.87% -0.57%
 $      10.99         421 0.04% -0.01%
 $      11.99         549 0.05% -0.01%
 $      12.99      1,010 0.09% -0.01%
 $      13.99         270 0.02% -0.01%
 $      14.99      1,272 0.11% 0.00%
 $      15.99 142 0.01% 0.01%
 $      16.99         102 0.01% 0.00%
 $      17.99         192 0.02% 0.00%
 $      18.99           44 0.00% 0.00%
 $      19.99         279 0.02% 0.00%
 $      20.99           19 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         134 0.01% 0.00%
 $      22.99           30 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           36 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99         108 0.01% 0.00%

2/1/2012
Total 1,207,522
Prime 1,112,467
Under $10 994,448
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   107,238 8.88% 0.37%
 $        1.99      8,528 0.71% -0.67%
 $        2.99 28,515 2.36% -0.92%
 $        3.99      7,463 0.62% -1.49%
 $        4.99      6,509 0.54% -1.03%
 $        5.99      2,761 0.23% -0.15%
 $        6.99      2,740 0.23% -0.20%
 $        7.99      7,571 0.63% -0.36%
 $        8.99     13,377 1.11% 0.04%
 $        9.99     58,244 4.82% -1.05%
 $      10.99         331 0.03% -0.01%
 $      11.99         476 0.04% -0.01%
 $      12.99         914 0.08% -0.01%
 $      13.99         186 0.02% -0.01%
 $      14.99         988 0.08% -0.03%
 $      15.99 82 0.01% -0.01%
 $      16.99           98 0.01% 0.00%
 $      17.99         194 0.02% 0.00%
 $      18.99           59 0.00% 0.00%
 $      19.99         167 0.01% -0.01%
 $      20.99           15 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         163 0.01% 0.00%
 $      22.99           20 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           19 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99           58 0.00% 0.00%

3/1/2012
Total 1,265,632
Prime 1,165,368
Under $10 1,044,889
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   113,150 8.94% 0.06%
 $        1.99     10,638 0.84% 0.13%
 $        2.99 43,320 3.42% 1.06%
 $        3.99     18,776 1.48% 0.87%
 $        4.99      8,565 0.68% 0.14%
 $        5.99      3,879 0.31% 0.08%
 $        6.99      3,591 0.28% 0.06%
 $        7.99      8,164 0.65% 0.02%
 $        8.99     14,825 1.17% 0.06%
 $        9.99     62,009 4.90% 0.08%
 $      10.99         375 0.03% 0.00%
 $      11.99         673 0.05% 0.01%
 $      12.99         936 0.07% 0.00%
 $      13.99         249 0.02% 0.00%
 $      14.99      1,005 0.08% 0.00%
 $      15.99 117 0.01% 0.00%
 $      16.99         102 0.01% 0.00%
 $      17.99         210 0.02% 0.00%
 $      18.99           55 0.00% 0.00%
 $      19.99         213 0.02% 0.00%
 $      20.99           12 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         170 0.01% 0.00%
 $      22.99           26 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           20 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99           73 0.01% 0.00%

4/1/2012
Total 1,315,927
Prime 1,215,625
Under $10 1,089,619
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   118,411 9.00% 0.06%
 $        1.99     12,440 0.95% 0.10%
 $        2.99 53,686 4.08% 0.66%
 $        3.99     30,997 2.36% 0.87%
 $        4.99     10,786 0.82% 0.14%
 $        5.99      5,026 0.38% 0.08%
 $        6.99      4,705 0.36% 0.07%
 $        7.99      8,988 0.68% 0.04%
 $        8.99      5,461 0.41% -0.76%
 $        9.99     71,568 5.44% 0.54%
 $      10.99         654 0.05% 0.02%
 $      11.99      1,281 0.10% 0.04%
 $      12.99      1,835 0.14% 0.07%
 $      13.99         438 0.03% 0.01%
 $      14.99      1,739 0.13% 0.05%
 $      15.99 323 0.02% 0.02%
 $      16.99         236 0.02% 0.01%
 $      17.99           86 0.01% -0.01%
 $      18.99         118 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         395 0.03% 0.01%
 $      20.99           25 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         272 0.02% 0.01%
 $      22.99           34 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           17 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99           96 0.01% 0.00%

5/1/2012
Total 1,358,922
Prime 1,261,606
Under $10 1,133,793
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   122,040 9.27% 0.28%
 $        1.99     13,124 1.00% 0.05%
 $        2.99 64,106 4.87% 0.79%
 $        3.99     37,072 2.82% 0.46%
 $        4.99     12,631 0.96% 0.14%
 $        5.99      6,288 0.48% 0.10%
 $        6.99      4,897 0.37% 0.01%
 $        7.99     10,145 0.77% 0.09%
 $        8.99      3,156 0.24% -0.18%
 $        9.99     76,063 5.78% 0.34%
 $      10.99         809 0.06% 0.01%
 $      11.99      1,816 0.14% 0.04%
 $      12.99      2,159 0.16% 0.02%
 $      13.99         565 0.04% 0.01%
 $      14.99      2,010 0.15% 0.02%
 $      15.99 140 0.01% -0.01%
 $      16.99         306 0.02% 0.01%
 $      17.99           78 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99           91 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         471 0.04% 0.01%
 $      20.99           24 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         283 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99           34 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           27 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99         150 0.01% 0.00%

5/1/2012
Total 1,407,210
Prime 1,308,331
Under $10 1,174,668
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   125,811 9.56% 0.29%
 $        1.99     13,076 0.99% 0.00%
 $        2.99 66,685 5.07% 0.20%
 $        3.99     36,204 2.75% -0.07%
 $        4.99     11,225 0.85% -0.11%
 $        5.99      5,903 0.45% -0.03%
 $        6.99      4,569 0.35% -0.02%
 $        7.99     10,524 0.80% 0.03%
 $        8.99      2,717 0.21% -0.03%
 $        9.99     71,733 5.45% -0.33%
 $      10.99         885 0.07% 0.01%
 $      11.99      1,818 0.14% 0.00%
 $      12.99      2,140 0.16% 0.00%
 $      13.99         684 0.05% 0.01%
 $      14.99      2,042 0.16% 0.00%
 $      15.99 182 0.01% 0.00%
 $      16.99         302 0.02% 0.00%
 $      17.99           73 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99         108 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         513 0.04% 0.00%
 $      20.99           29 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         251 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99           35 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           29 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99           97 0.01% 0.00%

7/1/2012
Total 1,451,504
Prime 1,343,776
Under $10 1,204,888
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   129,323 8.91% -0.65%
 $        1.99     12,780 0.88% -0.11%
 $        2.99 64,315 4.43% -0.64%
 $        3.99     27,128 1.87% -0.88%
 $        4.99     12,335 0.85% 0.00%
 $        5.99      6,307 0.43% -0.01%
 $        6.99      5,118 0.35% 0.01%
 $        7.99     10,689 0.74% -0.06%
 $        8.99      2,871 0.20% -0.01%
 $        9.99     78,303 5.39% -0.06%
 $      10.99         875 0.06% -0.01%
 $      11.99      1,804 0.12% -0.01%
 $      12.99      2,291 0.16% 0.00%
 $      13.99         688 0.05% 0.00%
 $      14.99      2,225 0.15% 0.00%
 $      15.99 218 0.02% 0.00%
 $      16.99         332 0.02% 0.00%
 $      17.99           79 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99         104 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         443 0.03% -0.01%
 $      20.99           26 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         319 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99           44 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           30 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99         109 0.01% 0.00%

8/1/2012
Total 1,486,649
Prime 1,379,399
Under $10 1,240,062
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   137,876 9.27% 0.36%
 $        1.99      9,880 0.66% -0.22%
 $        2.99 46,971 3.16% -1.27%
 $        3.99     12,096 0.81% -1.06%
 $        4.99      8,445 0.57% -0.28%
 $        5.99      4,956 0.33% -0.10%
 $        6.99      3,180 0.21% -0.14%
 $        7.99     10,781 0.73% -0.01%
 $        8.99      2,877 0.19% 0.00%
 $        9.99     70,140 4.72% -0.68%
 $      10.99         962 0.06% 0.00%
 $      11.99      1,910 0.13% 0.00%
 $      12.99      2,371 0.16% 0.00%
 $      13.99         636 0.04% 0.00%
 $      14.99      2,056 0.14% -0.01%
 $      15.99 192 0.01% 0.00%
 $      16.99         357 0.02% 0.00%
 $      17.99         121 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99           82 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         337 0.02% -0.01%
 $      20.99           35 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         364 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99           38 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           24 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99           86 0.01% 0.00%

9/1/2012
Total 1,531,069
Prime 1,421,168
Under $10 1,278,733
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   144,288 9.42% 0.15%
 $        1.99     13,399 0.88% 0.21%
 $        2.99 68,395 4.47% 1.31%
 $        3.99     14,760 0.96% 0.15%
 $        4.99     11,627 0.76% 0.19%
 $        5.99      6,456 0.42% 0.09%
 $        6.99      5,407 0.35% 0.14%
 $        7.99     11,697 0.76% 0.04%
 $        8.99      3,050 0.20% 0.01%
 $        9.99     74,605 4.87% 0.15%
 $      10.99         955 0.06% 0.00%
 $      11.99      1,973 0.13% 0.00%
 $      12.99      2,119 0.14% -0.02%
 $      13.99         582 0.04% 0.00%
 $      14.99      2,039 0.13% -0.01%
 $      15.99 212 0.01% 0.00%
 $      16.99         347 0.02% 0.00%
 $      17.99         127 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99           81 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         385 0.03% 0.00%
 $      20.99           19 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         313 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99           38 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           26 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99           99 0.01% 0.00%

10/1/2012
Total 1,579,329
Prime 1,466,890
Under $10 1,322,272
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   147,931 9.37% -0.06%
 $        1.99     16,053 1.02% 0.14%
 $        2.99 87,788 5.56% 1.09%
 $        3.99     20,853 1.32% 0.36%
 $        4.99     14,656 0.93% 0.17%
 $        5.99      7,558 0.48% 0.06%
 $        6.99      6,642 0.42% 0.07%
 $        7.99     13,807 0.87% 0.11%
 $        8.99      3,256 0.21% 0.01%
 $        9.99     84,003 5.32% 0.45%
 $      10.99         972 0.06% 0.00%
 $      11.99      2,052 0.13% 0.00%
 $      12.99      2,189 0.14% 0.00%
 $      13.99         587 0.04% 0.00%
 $      14.99      2,123 0.13% 0.00%
 $      15.99 216 0.01% 0.00%
 $      16.99         339 0.02% 0.00%
 $      17.99         109 0.01% 0.00%
 $      18.99         117 0.01% 0.00%
 $      19.99         509 0.03% 0.01%
 $      20.99           32 0.00% 0.00%
 $      21.99         371 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99           38 0.00% 0.00%
 $      23.99           32 0.00% 0.00%
 $      24.99         109 0.01% 0.00%

Total 1,641,362
Prime 1,522,810
Under $10 1,371,227
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99   155,732 9.49% 0.12%
 $    1.99     24,777 1.51% 0.49%
 $    2.99 134,461 8.19% 2.63%
 $    3.99     49,221 3.00% 1.68%
 $    4.99     29,671 1.81% 0.88%
 $    5.99     15,629 0.95% 0.47%
 $    6.99     12,969 0.79% 0.37%
 $    7.99     22,527 1.37% 0.50%
 $    8.99      6,642 0.40% 0.20%
 $    9.99   134,811 8.21% 2.89%
 $   10.99      1,576 0.10% 0.03%
 $   11.99      2,986 0.18% 0.05%
 $   12.99      3,292 0.20% 0.06%
 $   13.99         894 0.05% 0.02%
 $   14.99      2,717 0.17% 0.03%
 $   15.99 319 0.02% 0.01%
 $   16.99         481 0.03% 0.01%
 $   17.99         235 0.01% 0.01%
 $   18.99         237 0.01% 0.01%
 $   19.99         902 0.05% 0.02%
 $   20.99           68 0.00% 0.00%
 $   21.99         431 0.03% 0.00%
 $   22.99           87 0.01% 0.00%
 $   23.99           86 0.01% 0.00%
 $   24.99         218 0.01% 0.01%

12/1/2012
Total 1,742,991
Prime 1,615,716
Under $10 1,451,437
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   163,634 9.97% 0.48%
 $        1.99     40,111 2.44% 0.93%
 $        2.99 192,449 11.72% 3.53%
 $        3.99   122,419 7.46% 4.46%
 $        4.99     50,073 3.05% 1.24%
 $        5.99     27,780 1.69% 0.74%
 $        6.99     20,681 1.26% 0.47%
 $        7.99     40,348 2.46% 1.09%
 $        8.99     10,692 0.65% 0.25%
 $        9.99   236,101 14.38% 6.17%
 $      10.99      2,423 0.15% 0.05%
 $      11.99      4,346 0.26% 0.08%
 $      12.99      4,614 0.28% 0.08%
 $      13.99      1,299 0.08% 0.02%
 $      14.99      3,439 0.21% 0.04%
 $      15.99 840 0.05% 0.03%
 $      16.99         595 0.04% 0.01%
 $      17.99         354 0.02% 0.01%
 $      18.99         495 0.03% 0.02%
 $      19.99      1,498 0.09% 0.04%
 $      20.99         120 0.01% 0.00%
 $      21.99         383 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99         153 0.01% 0.00%
 $      23.99         136 0.01% 0.00%
 $      24.99         370 0.02% 0.01%

1/1/2013
Total 1,805,001
Prime 1,671,220
Under $10 1,502,267
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99   172,149 10.49% 0.52%
 $    1.99     42,262 2.57% 0.13%
 $    2.99 206,531 12.58% 0.86%
 $    3.99   126,369 7.70% 0.24%
 $    4.99     52,158 3.18% 0.13%
 $    5.99     29,128 1.77% 0.08%
 $    6.99     20,656 1.26% 0.00%
 $    7.99     41,417 2.52% 0.07%
 $    8.99     10,775 0.66% 0.01%
 $    9.99   235,662 14.36% -0.03%
 $   10.99      2,195 0.13% -0.01%
 $   11.99      4,123 0.25% -0.01%
 $   12.99      4,319 0.26% -0.02%
 $   13.99      1,207 0.07% -0.01%
 $   14.99      3,600 0.22% 0.01%
 $   15.99 966 0.06% 0.01%
 $   16.99         581 0.04% 0.00%
 $   17.99         377 0.02% 0.00%
 $   18.99         547 0.03% 0.00%
 $   19.99      3,087 0.19% 0.10%
 $   20.99         105 0.01% 0.00%
 $   21.99         418 0.03% 0.00%
 $   22.99         144 0.01% 0.00%
 $   23.99         136 0.01% 0.00%
 $   24.99         359 0.02% 0.00%

Percentages for February 1, 2013 were corrected on March 1, 2013

2/1/2013
Total 1,849,479
Prime 1,713,256
Under $10 1,534,604
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99   178,913 9.67% -0.81%
 $    1.99     45,121 2.44% -0.14%
 $    2.99 214,748 11.61% -0.97%
 $    3.99   130,320 7.05% -0.65%
 $    4.99     54,653 2.96% -0.22%
 $    5.99     31,434 1.70% -0.08%
 $    6.99     21,941 1.19% -0.07%
 $    7.99     42,620 2.30% -0.22%
 $    8.99     10,835 0.59% -0.07%
 $    9.99   230,800 12.48% -1.88%
 $   10.99      2,463 0.13% 0.00%
 $   11.99      4,593 0.25% 0.00%
 $   12.99      4,563 0.25% -0.02%
 $   13.99      1,304 0.07% 0.00%
 $   14.99      3,703 0.20% -0.02%
 $   15.99 1,004 0.05% 0.00%
 $   16.99         659 0.04% 0.00%
 $   17.99         435 0.02% 0.00%
 $   18.99         598 0.03% 0.00%
 $   19.99      5,276 0.29% 0.10%
 $   20.99         116 0.01% 0.00%
 $   21.99         458 0.02% 0.00%
 $   22.99         178 0.01% 0.00%
 $   23.99         154 0.01% 0.00%
 $   24.99         395 0.02% 0.00%

3/1/2013
Total 1,913,164
Prime 1,770,452
Under $10 1,564,429
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   187,353 9.79% 0.12%
 $        1.99     49,309 2.58% 0.14%
 $        2.99 227,956 11.92% 0.30%
 $        3.99   133,323 6.97% -0.08%
 $        4.99     58,386 3.05% 0.10%
 $        5.99     35,339 1.85% 0.15%
 $        6.99     25,102 1.31% 0.13%
 $        7.99     45,755 2.39% 0.09%
 $        8.99     12,282 0.64% 0.06%
 $        9.99   224,082 11.71% -0.77%
 $      10.99      3,590 0.19% 0.05%
 $      11.99      7,838 0.41% 0.16%
 $      12.99      6,533 0.34% 0.09%
 $      13.99      2,318 0.12% 0.05%
 $      14.99      4,760 0.25% 0.05%
 $      15.99 1,341 0.07% 0.02%
 $      16.99      1,129 0.06% 0.02%
 $      17.99         719 0.04% 0.01%
 $      18.99         920 0.05% 0.02%
 $      19.99      5,711 0.30% 0.01%
 $      20.99         303 0.02% 0.01%
 $      21.99         280 0.01% -0.01%
 $      22.99         359 0.02% 0.01%
 $      23.99         250 0.01% 0.00%
 $      24.99         482 0.03% 0.00%

4/1/2013
Total 1,924,138
Prime 1,785,986
Under $10 1,573,845
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   193,771 10.07% 0.28%
 $        1.99     50,993 2.65% 0.07%
 $        2.99 240,734 12.51% 0.60%
 $        3.99   138,910 7.22% 0.25%
 $        4.99     60,568 3.15% 0.10%
 $        5.99     37,409 1.94% 0.10%
 $        6.99     25,863 1.34% 0.03%
 $        7.99     47,298 2.46% 0.07%
 $        8.99     12,791 0.66% 0.02%
 $        9.99   235,041 12.22% 0.50%
 $      10.99      3,781 0.20% 0.01%
 $      11.99      9,716 0.50% 0.10%
 $      12.99      6,538 0.34% 0.00%
 $      13.99      2,325 0.12% 0.00%
 $      14.99      4,848 0.25% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,403 0.07% 0.00%
 $      16.99      1,182 0.06% 0.00%
 $      17.99         759 0.04% 0.00%
 $      18.99         922 0.05% 0.00%
 $      19.99      5,772 0.30% 0.00%
 $      20.99         249 0.01% 0.00%
 $      21.99         277 0.01% 0.00%
 $      22.99      3,212 0.17% 0.15%
 $      23.99         281 0.01% 0.00%
 $      24.99         519 0.03% 0.00%

5/1/2013
Total 1,940,274
Prime 1,801,844
Under $10 1,582,685
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99   201,240 10.37% 0.30%
 $    1.99     52,243 2.69% 0.04%
 $    2.99 251,311 12.95% 0.44%
 $    3.99   141,835 7.31% 0.09%
 $    4.99     62,839 3.24% 0.09%
 $    5.99     37,835 1.95% 0.01%
 $    6.99     25,567 1.32% -0.03%
 $    7.99     42,663 2.20% -0.26%
 $    8.99     13,147 0.68% 0.01%
 $    9.99   237,096 12.22% 0.00%
 $   10.99      3,738 0.19% 0.00%
 $   11.99      9,891 0.51% 0.00%
 $   12.99      7,097 0.37% 0.03%
 $   13.99      2,922 0.15% 0.03%
 $   14.99      5,166 0.27% 0.01%
 $   15.99 1,523 0.08% 0.01%
 $   16.99      1,263 0.07% 0.00%
 $   17.99         795 0.04% 0.00%
 $   18.99         992 0.05% 0.00%
 $   19.99      5,704 0.29% -0.01%
 $   20.99         403 0.02% 0.01%
 $   21.99         282 0.01% 0.00%
 $   22.99         325 0.02% -0.15%
 $   23.99         278 0.01% 0.00%
 $   24.99         513 0.03% 0.00%

6/1/2013
Total 1,972,277
Prime 1,828,577
Under $10 1,605,912
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99   203,653 10.33% -0.05%
 $    1.99     59,583 3.02% 0.33%
 $    2.99 269,149 13.65% 0.69%
 $    3.99   177,673 9.01% 1.70%
 $    4.99     64,192 3.25% 0.02%
 $    5.99     39,122 1.98% 0.03%
 $    6.99     26,506 1.34% 0.03%
 $    7.99     44,572 2.26% 0.06%
 $    8.99     13,388 0.68% 0.00%
 $    9.99   246,384 12.49% 0.27%
 $   10.99      3,809 0.19% 0.00%
 $   11.99     10,090 0.51% 0.00%
 $   12.99      7,409 0.38% 0.01%
 $   13.99      3,008 0.15% 0.00%
 $   14.99      5,322 0.27% 0.00%
 $   15.99 1,560 0.08% 0.00%
 $   16.99      1,298 0.07% 0.00%
 $   17.99         772 0.04% 0.00%
 $   18.99         970 0.05% 0.00%
 $   19.99      5,749 0.29% 0.00%
 $   20.99         239 0.01% -0.01%
 $   21.99         287 0.01% 0.00%
 $   22.99         307 0.02% 0.00%
 $   23.99         238 0.01% 0.00%
 $   24.99         513 0.03% 0.00%

7/1/2013
Total 1,998,705
Prime 1,855,614
Under $10 1,627,666
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   213,310 10.67% 0.35%
 $        1.99     62,342 3.12% 0.10%
 $        2.99 278,848 13.95% 0.30%
 $        3.99   193,610 9.69% 0.68%
 $        4.99     66,074 3.31% 0.05%
 $        5.99     40,374 2.02% 0.04%
 $        6.99     27,288 1.37% 0.02%
 $        7.99     45,103 2.26% 0.00%
 $        8.99     13,847 0.69% 0.01%
 $        9.99   284,366 14.23% 1.74%
 $      10.99      4,009 0.20% 0.01%
 $      11.99     10,950 0.55% 0.04%
 $      12.99      7,321 0.37% -0.01%
 $      13.99      3,474 0.17% 0.02%
 $      14.99      5,331 0.27% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,596 0.08% 0.00%
 $      16.99      1,391 0.07% 0.00%
 $      17.99         791 0.04% 0.00%
 $      18.99         997 0.05% 0.00%
 $      19.99      5,888 0.29% 0.00%
 $      20.99         427 0.02% 0.01%
 $      21.99         316 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99         315 0.02% 0.00%
 $      23.99         303 0.02% 0.00%
 $      24.99         536 0.03% 0.00%

8/1/2013
Total 2,060,431
Prime 1,913,454
Under $10 1,681,162
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $    0.99   222,737 10.81% 0.14%
 $    1.99     64,606 3.14% 0.02%
 $    2.99 291,135 14.13% 0.18%
 $    3.99   198,365 9.63% -0.06%
 $    4.99     68,727 3.34% 0.03%
 $    5.99     41,493 2.01% -0.01%
 $    6.99     26,838 1.30% -0.06%
 $    7.99     43,276 2.10% -0.16%
 $    8.99     14,083 0.68% -0.01%
 $    9.99   250,215 12.14% -2.08%
 $   10.99      4,366 0.21% 0.01%
 $   11.99     10,785 0.52% -0.02%
 $   12.99      5,311 0.26% -0.11%
 $   13.99      5,063 0.25% 0.07%
 $   14.99      5,243 0.25% -0.01%
 $   15.99 1,700 0.08% 0.00%
 $   16.99      1,496 0.07% 0.00%
 $   17.99         884 0.04% 0.00%
 $   18.99      1,112 0.05% 0.00%
 $   19.99      6,138 0.30% 0.00%
 $   20.99         525 0.03% 0.00%
 $   21.99         452 0.02% 0.01%
 $   22.99      1,217 0.06% 0.04%
 $   23.99         492 0.02% 0.01%
 $   24.99         603 0.03% 0.00%

9/5/2013
Total 2,125,648
Prime 1,975,738
Under $10 1,740,605
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99   231,849 10.91% 0.10%
 $        1.99     66,882 3.15% 0.01%
 $        2.99 306,025 14.40% 0.27%
 $        3.99   205,151 9.65% 0.02%
 $        4.99     70,590 3.32% -0.01%
 $        5.99     50,259 2.36% 0.35%
 $        6.99     26,971 1.27% -0.03%
 $        7.99     46,685 2.20% 0.10%
 $        8.99     14,005 0.66% -0.02%
 $        9.99   259,151 12.19% 0.05%
 $      10.99      7,970 0.37% 0.16%
 $      11.99      7,437 0.35% -0.17%
 $      12.99      4,779 0.22% -0.03%
 $      13.99      4,446 0.21% -0.04%
 $      14.99      4,586 0.22% -0.04%
 $      15.99 1,481 0.07% -0.01%
 $      16.99      1,635 0.08% 0.00%
 $      17.99      1,117 0.05% 0.01%
 $      18.99         902 0.04% -0.01%
 $      19.99      6,213 0.29% -0.01%
 $      20.99         529 0.02% 0.00%
 $      21.99         596 0.03% 0.01%
 $      22.99      1,651 0.08% 0.02%
 $      23.99         557 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99         651 0.03% 0.00%

10/1/2013
Total 2,175,847
Prime 2,024,990
Under $10 1,777,735
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
 $        0.99    238,423 10.96% 0.05%
  $        1.99      68,359 3.14% -0.01%
  $        2.99    317,934 14.61% 0.21%
  $        3.99    312,151 14.35% 4.70%
  $        4.99      73,574 3.38% 0.06%
  $        5.99      51,850 2.38% 0.02%
  $        6.99      28,129 1.29% 0.02%
  $        7.99      48,784 2.24% 0.04%
  $        8.99      14,346 0.66% 0.00%
  $        9.99    259,306 11.92% -0.27%
  $      10.99        8,826 0.41% 0.04%
  $      11.99        7,401 0.34% -0.01%
  $      12.99        4,852 0.22% 0.00%
  $      13.99        4,469 0.21% 0.00%
  $      14.99        4,961 0.23% 0.01%
  $      15.99        1,490 0.07% 0.00%
  $      16.99        1,727 0.08% 0.00%
  $      17.99        1,525 0.07% 0.02%
  $      18.99           970 0.04% 0.00%
  $      19.99        6,421 0.30% 0.01%
  $      20.99           553 0.03% 0.01%
  $      21.99           595 0.03% 0.00%
  $      22.99        1,625 0.07% -0.01%
  $      23.99           577 0.03% 0.00%
  $      24.99           613 0.03% 0.00%

11/1/2013
Total 2,229,223
Prime 2,073,157
Under $10 1,823,817
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 245,549 11.02% 0.06%
 $        1.99 70,824 3.18% 0.04%
 $        2.99 325,129 14.58% -0.03%
 $        3.99 213,135 9.56% -4.79%
 $        4.99 74,995 3.36% -0.02%
 $        5.99 53,013 2.38% 0.00%
 $        6.99 28,248 1.27% -0.03%
 $        7.99 47,988 2.15% -0.09%
 $        8.99 14,539 0.65% -0.01%
 $        9.99 266,628 11.96% 0.04%
 $      10.99 8,790 0.39% -0.01%
 $      11.99 7,682 0.34% 0.00%
 $      12.99 5,598 0.25% 0.03%
 $      13.99 4,992 0.22% 0.02%
 $      14.99 5,054 0.23% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,275 0.06% -0.01%
 $      16.99 1,834 0.08% 0.00%
 $      17.99 1,240 0.06% -0.01%
 $      18.99 895 0.04% 0.00%
 $      19.99 6,502 0.29% 0.00%
 $      20.99 602 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 691 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 1,839 0.08% 0.01%
 $      23.99 645 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 729 0.03% 0.00%

12/1/2013
Total 2,287,866
Prime 2,130,446
Under $10 1,875,538
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 255,501 11.17% 0.15%
 $        1.99 74,368 3.25% 0.07%
 $        2.99 337,864 14.77% 0.18%
 $        3.99 218,896 9.57% 0.01%
 $        4.99 77,232 3.38% 0.01%
 $        5.99 55,270 2.42% 0.04%
 $        6.99 30,860 1.35% 0.08%
 $        7.99 49,240 2.15% 0.00%
 $        8.99 15,487 0.68% 0.02%
 $        9.99 272,875 11.93% -0.03%
 $      10.99 9,398 0.41% 0.02%
 $      11.99 7,774 0.34% 0.00%
 $      12.99 6,022 0.26% 0.01%
 $      13.99 5,961 0.26% 0.04%
 $      14.99 5,213 0.23% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,364 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 2,014 0.09% 0.01%
 $      17.99 1,388 0.06% 0.01%
 $      18.99 964 0.04% 0.00%
 $      19.99 6,732 0.29% 0.00%
 $      20.99 617 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 601 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,212 0.10% 0.01%
 $      23.99 720 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 713 0.03% 0.00%

1/1/2014
Total 2,351,290
Prime 2,193,346
Under $10 1,932,395
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 264,312 11.24% 0.07%
 $        1.99 76,862 3.27% 0.02%
 $        2.99 351,577 14.95% 0.18%
 $        3.99 225,039 9.57% 0.00%
 $        4.99 80,375 3.42% 0.04%
 $        5.99 56,485 2.40% -0.01%
 $        6.99 31,851 1.35% 0.01%
 $        7.99 49,583 2.11% -0.04%
 $        8.99 15,829 0.67% 0.00%
 $        9.99 275,314 11.71% -0.22%
 $      10.99 9,434 0.40% -0.01%
 $      11.99 7,279 0.31% -0.03%
 $      12.99 6,069 0.26% -0.01%
 $      13.99 6,200 0.26% 0.00%
 $      14.99 5,247 0.22% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,405 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 1,986 0.08% 0.00%
 $      17.99 1,417 0.06% 0.00%
 $      18.99 1,068 0.05% 0.00%
 $      19.99 6,682 0.28% -0.01%
 $      20.99 638 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 627 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,177 0.09% 0.00%
 $      23.99 696 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 737 0.03% 0.00%

2/1/2014
Total 2,411,705
Prime 2,254,215
Under $10 1,976,453
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 273,966 11.36% 0.12%
 $        1.99 79,239 3.29% 0.02%
 $        2.99 365,052 15.14% 0.18%
 $        3.99 231,231 9.59% 0.02%
 $        4.99 83,304 3.45% 0.04%
 $        5.99 58,024 2.41% 0.00%
 $        6.99 32,588 1.35% 0.00%
 $        7.99 51,152 2.12% 0.01%
 $        8.99 16,244 0.67% 0.00%
 $        9.99 271,056 11.24% -0.47%
 $      10.99 9,818 0.41% 0.01%
 $      11.99 7,157 0.30% -0.01%
 $      12.99 6,374 0.26% 0.01%
 $      13.99 6,351 0.26% 0.00%
 $      14.99 5,133 0.21% -0.01%
 $      15.99 1,452 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 2,055 0.09% 0.00%
 $      17.99 1,391 0.06% 0.00%
 $      18.99 1,079 0.04% 0.00%
 $      19.99 6,754 0.28% 0.00%
 $      20.99 663 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 718 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,279 0.09% 0.00%
 $      23.99 656 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 853 0.04% 0.00%

3/1/2014
Total 2,462,832
Prime 2,300,490
Under $10 2,012,504
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 276,416 11.22% -0.14%
 $        1.99 81,172 3.30% 0.01%
 $        2.99 374,242 15.20% 0.06%
 $        3.99 236,420 9.60% 0.01%
 $        4.99 85,557 3.47% 0.02%
 $        5.99 59,557 2.42% 0.01%
 $        6.99 33,228 1.35% 0.00%
 $        7.99 52,582 2.14% 0.01%
 $        8.99 16,399 0.67% -0.01%
 $        9.99 271,867 11.04% -0.20%
 $      10.99 9,903 0.40% 0.00%
 $      11.99 6,796 0.28% -0.02%
 $      12.99 6,580 0.27% 0.00%
 $      13.99 6,378 0.26% 0.00%
 $      14.99 5,281 0.21% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,573 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 2,122 0.09% 0.00%
 $      17.99 1,494 0.06% 0.00%
 $      18.99 1,112 0.05% 0.00%
 $      19.99 6,907 0.28% 0.00%
 $      20.99 666 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 656 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,359 0.10% 0.00%
 $      23.99 727 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 774 0.03% 0.00%

4/1/2014 N/A

May comparisons are to March.

5/1/2014
Total 2,576,453
Prime 2,404,221
Under $10 2,106,603
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 293,126 11.38% 0.15%
 $        1.99 86,947 3.37% 0.08%
 $        2.99 401,044 15.57% 0.37%
 $        3.99 233,515 9.06% -0.54%
 $        4.99 91,936 3.57% 0.09%
 $        5.99 61,776 2.40% -0.02%
 $        6.99 34,697 1.35% 0.00%
 $        7.99 54,851 2.13% -0.01%
 $        8.99 17,514 0.68% 0.01%
 $        9.99 278,815 10.82% -0.22%
 $      10.99 9,961 0.39% -0.02%
 $      11.99 6,970 0.27% -0.01%
 $      12.99 7,058 0.27% 0.01%
 $      13.99 6,988 0.27% 0.01%
 $      14.99 5,450 0.21% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,662 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 2,160 0.08% 0.00%
 $      17.99 1,405 0.05% -0.01%
 $      18.99 1,181 0.05% 0.00%
 $      19.99 7,098 0.28% 0.00%
 $      20.99 726 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 698 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,634 0.10% 0.01%
 $      23.99 901 0.03% 0.01%
 $      24.99 828 0.03% 0.00%

Note: these numbers appear to be more accurate than numbers run earlier in the day, when it seems that searching Amazon was producing lower counts than would be expected.

6/1/2014
Total 2,597,112
Prime 2,422,630
Under $10 2,121,022
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 301,021 11.59% 0.21%
 $        1.99 88,333 3.40% 0.03%
 $        2.99 415,189 15.99% 0.42%
 $        3.99 209,623 8.07% -0.99%
 $        4.99 94,762 3.65% 0.08%
 $        5.99 62,434 2.40% 0.01%
 $        6.99 35,976 1.39% 0.04%
 $        7.99 56,787 2.19% 0.06%
 $        8.99 18,236 0.70% 0.02%
 $        9.99 281,246 10.83% 0.01%
 $      10.99 9,351 0.36% -0.03%
 $      11.99 7,042 0.27% 0.00%
 $      12.99 7,059 0.27% 0.00%
 $      13.99 6,890 0.27% -0.01%
 $      14.99 5,576 0.21% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,584 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 2,123 0.08% 0.00%
 $      17.99 1,406 0.05% 0.00%
 $      18.99 1,116 0.04% 0.00%
 $      19.99 7,015 0.27% -0.01%
 $      20.99 703 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 665 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,578 0.10% 0.00%
 $      23.99 854 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 822 0.03% 0.00%

7/1/2014
Total 2,655,727
Prime 2,477,343
Under $10 2,172,079
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 311,255 11.72% 0.13%
 $        1.99 89,893 3.38% -0.02%
 $        2.99 427,848 16.11% 0.12%
 $        3.99 212,706 8.01% -0.06%
 $        4.99 97,481 3.67% 0.02%
 $        5.99 63,729 2.40% 0.00%
 $        6.99 37,002 1.39% 0.01%
 $        7.99 58,427 2.20% 0.01%
 $        8.99 18,326 0.69% -0.01%
 $        9.99 288,137 10.85% 0.02%
 $      10.99 9,602 0.36% 0.00%
 $      11.99 7,017 0.26% -0.01%
 $      12.99 7,169 0.27% 0.00%
 $      13.99 7,033 0.26% 0.00%
 $      14.99 5,601 0.21% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,527 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 1,991 0.07% -0.01%
 $      17.99 1,253 0.05% -0.01%
 $      18.99 1,051 0.04% 0.00%
 $      19.99 6,999 0.26% -0.01%
 $      20.99 684 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 645 0.02% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,650 0.10% 0.00%
 $      23.99 875 0.03% 0.00%
 $      24.99 853 0.03% 0.00%

8/1/2014
Total 2,725,829
Prime 2,546,640
Under $10 2,234,045
Price Point Count Percentage Diff
$        0.99 319,829 11.73% 0.01%
 $        1.99 93,589 3.43% 0.05%
 $        2.99 446,323 16.37% 0.26%
 $        3.99 217,796 7.99% -0.02%
 $        4.99 103,009 3.78% 0.11%
 $        5.99 65,203 2.39% -0.01%
 $        6.99 38,298 1.41% 0.01%
 $        7.99 60,420 2.22% 0.02%
 $        8.99 21,181 0.78% 0.09%
 $        9.99 293,641 10.77% -0.08%
 $      10.99 10,525 0.39% 0.02%
 $      11.99 7,556 0.28% 0.01%
 $      12.99 7,698 0.28% 0.01%
 $      13.99 6,724 0.25% -0.02%
 $      14.99 5,871 0.22% 0.00%
 $      15.99 1,656 0.06% 0.00%
 $      16.99 2,292 0.08% 0.01%
 $      17.99 1,830 0.07% 0.02%
 $      18.99 1,183 0.04% 0.00%
 $      19.99 7,239 0.27% 0.00%
 $      20.99 717 0.03% 0.00%
 $      21.99 744 0.03% 0.00%
 $      22.99 2,679 0.10% 0.00%
 $      23.99 960 0.04% 0.00%
 $      24.99 915 0.03% 0.00%

Note: the titles in store, $0.01 to $50, and under$10 numbers reflect the updated results when I ran these later in the same day.

Summary

Generally, this was a good month! More content (the average books per day was notably up), and prices were good, with the exception of New York Times  hardback fiction equivalents, which were up thirty cents on average. This is also the first month we are recording the number of books in Kindle Unlimited…and it’s a lot higher than the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (which continued to grow).

Data were drawn using http://www.ereaderiq.com. There are a number of possible sources of errors (eRi, Amazon, me), but these are probably pretty good.  The same people now do eReaderIQ.com, and I may switch to that eventually.  However, I’m reluctant to change my methods in order to maintain consistency.

  • The free books referenced here are from the Kindle store: there are many other sources for free books
  • My search for textbooks definitely has false positives (books that aren’t really textbooks). I search for -domain (to eliminate public domain titles, which would be older books, generally) textbook. That would find a book about textbooks, for example
  • I searched for “Spanish edition” to find Spanish language books. That has some false positives as well
  • I look at price percentages of books in the range of one penny to fifty dollars, to eliminate freebies and limit textbooks
  • The price point analysis is for books at that specific price: it does not represent a range of prices
  • I compared the percentage of price points in the Price Point Analysis when I showed the difference…not the number of books
  • This information is based on what a United States customer sees

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

August 2014 Kindle book releases

August 1, 2014

August 2014 Kindle book releases

While I don’t generally pre-order Kindle store books myself, I know many of you do.

I understand the fun of just having the book show up, but I figure I’ll order when I want it…since I could have it within a minute, usually.…

These aren’t necessarily the most popular of the pre-orders…I’m just going to list ones that catch my eye. Since we might not agree on that, here’s a link to the 3,683 (at time of writing) August releases in the USA Kindle store:

August 2014 USA Kindle store releases (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

As usual, I won’t be deliberately linking to books which block text-to-speech access blocked**.

One interesting thing before I get into some individual titles: the first four (sorted by new and popular) are the

Kindle First (at AmazonSmile)

picks for this month!

Since Prime members can already be reading one of these (even though they aren’t officially released until August) at no additional cost, you can see how that would drive up their popularity as compared to actual pre-orders. Still, I think that’s the first time.

The other thing is that there are some Kindle Worlds titles way up on the list, and those are part of Kindle Unlimited. I’m concerned (and I’ve alerted Amazon about it) that people are confused: they think they are pre-ordering a KU borrow, when they are actually pre-ordering a purchase. In other words, they may be thinking they’ll get the book at no additional cost, and actually be charged for it. Amazon has confirmed for me: you can not pre-order a borrow from KU.

Okay…books!

Night Moves (at AmazonSmile)
by Nora Roberts
pre-order for August 4 (first Kindle issue of 1985 title)
romance – historical
$5.38

One of the most popular authors…period.

The Evolution and Equilibrium of Copyright in the Digital Age (Cambridge Intellectual Property and Information Law) (at AmazonSmile)
edited by Susy Frankel and Daniel Gervais
pre-order for August 31
law – intellectual property
$76.80

Okay, this isn’t for everybody…but I don’t like to just list super popular books. :) There are quite a few books from Cambridge being released on August 31st in the USA Kindle store.

Doing It (at AmazonSmile)
by Melvin Burgess
pre-order for August 31
fiction – young adult
$7.99

This is a Carnegie medal winning young adult novel (think the Newbery in the USA), but it sounds like it would get challenged as inappropriate a lot in school libraries…if those who would challenge can figure out the British slang. ;)

Election Administration in the United States: The State of Reform after Bush v. Gore (at AmazonSmile)
edited by R. Michael Alvarez and Bernard M. Grofman
pre-order for August 31
politics
$9.99 ($85 in print)

Avian (The Dragonrider Chronicles) (at AmazonSmile)
by Nicole Conway
young adult – fantasy
$3.49

I thought it might be related to Pern…it’s not.

Captain Underpants and the Tyrannical Retaliation of the Turbo Toilet 2000 ( at AmazonSmile
by Dav Pilkey
pre-order for August 26
children’s
$7.39

Often a challenged books in libraries. There is a Captain Underpants movie scheduled for release in 2017…

Sidewinders: Bleeding Texas (at AmazonSmile)
by William W. Johnstone with J.A. Johnstone
pre-order for August 5
fiction – Western
$5.49

J.A. is Bill’s nephew (Bill died about ten years ago, I think).

The Serpent and the Rope (at AmazonSmile)
by Raja Rao (translated by John Murray
pre-order for April 15
contemporary fiction
$9.99

Enjoy!

One more thing: in preparing this small selection, I was struck by how few of the Big Five publishers books I was seeing. That seemed quite unusual, and it actually worried me that negotiations might be keeping a high number of them out of the store. That could still be the case, but I did search by HarperCollins, and by Schuster (to find Simon &), and found books from both publishers scheduled to be released in August. While there still could be some being withheld, there are some scheduled.

That could just mean that they are dropping in relative popularity, so I’m not running across them as easily…hard to say, exactly. I’ll try to keep an eye on it.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) By the way, it’s been interesting lately to see Amazon remind me to “start at AmazonSmile” if I check a link on the original Amazon site. I do buy from AmazonSmile, but I have a lot of stored links I use to check for things.

** A Kindle with text-to-speech can read any text downloaded to it…unless that access is blocked by the publisher inserting code into the file to prevent it. That’s why you can have the device read personal documents to you (I’ve done that). I believe that this sort of access blocking disproportionately disadvantages the disabled, although I also believe it is legal (provided that there is at least one accessible version of each e-book available, however, that one can require a certification of disability). For that reason, I don’t deliberately link to books which block TTS access here (although it may happen accidentally, particularly if the access is blocked after I’ve linked it). I do believe this is a personal decision, and there  are legitimate arguments for purchasing those books. 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Amazon gives numbers: it’s about prices, not share

July 30, 2014

Amazon gives numbers: it’s about prices, not share

Amazon has added a fascinating

Kindle forum post (at AmazonSmile: support a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

which does something Amazon rarely does: it gives specific numbers.

I know when I do my analysis posts, some people just skip them. :) Not everybody likes seeing the mathematical interiors of something they enjoy:  for some, it’s like seeing an x-ray of the person they are dating. ;)

However, these are statistics as a weapon…a weapon in what I call the Hachazon war. That’s the ongoing disagreement between Amazon and Hachette, one of the Big Five publishers (presumably, Amazon is also in or going to be in similar negotiations with the other four).

It’s a carefully crafted post, with again, Amazon taking the populist/consumer point of view…and tacking on support for authors.

I’m not saying that isn’t how they sincerely feel: it certainly could be. It’s just apparent to me that the statement has a very large position framing component…and it’s reasonable that it does, of course.

I recommend that you read it, and I do want to point out some key points.

The biggest argument made is that Amazon isn’t fighting with Hachette over revenue share, as has been reported. It’s not (according to the e-tailer) about trying to get, say, 50% of the sale rather than 30%.

It’s about keeping the prices low.

Amazon argues that e-book prices should be lower than p-book (paperbook) prices. Since the rise in popularity of e-books with the release of the Kindle in 2007, that’s been many consumers’ intuitive sense. We would see posts about that all the time in the forums: “There is no paper cost, it’s just a file.”

For many of those posts, it was clear that they didn’t understand the economics (which Amazon presumably does). They were only talking about manufacture, and that is a small part of the cost of producing a book. I remember an analysis, way back when, that an e-book was about 12.5% less expensive to produce than a p-book.

How can that be?

What costs the most money isn’t the paper, it’s the people. Even for an e-book, you still need to pay the author (although not necessarily the same amount), the editor, the cover designer, the proofreader, the layout artist, and so on.

You still have the same legal costs.

Marketing costs could be different, but are still significant.

Amazon adds in other costs including, interestingly, used sales. Since e-books can’t be sold used, they argue, the initial price can be lower.

If a p-book is sold for $20, and then sold used for $10 and used again for $5, the publisher only gets money out of that initial $20. If the people who paid $10 and $5 for it would have paid $20 otherwise, those second and third sales are a loss of revenue…which the publisher has to make up on the first sale.

Of course, many people who buy a used book at a reduced cost wouldn’t have bought the new book at the full price…but it’s a reasonable argument. Amazon has worked on creating a used e-book market, but that would presumably be a case were the publisher would get a cut of subsequent sales.

Here’s the big stat in this short excerpt from the post:

“We’ve quantified the price elasticity of e-books from repeated measurements across many titles. For every copy an e-book would sell at $14.99, it would sell 1.74 copies if priced at $9.99. So, for example, if customers would buy 100,000 copies of a particular e-book at $14.99, then customers would buy 174,000 copies of that same e-book at $9.99. Total revenue at $14.99 would be $1,499,000. Total revenue at $9.99 is $1,738,000.”

Amazon is saying, “Lower the price and make more money.”

They explain how that benefits everybody: publishers; readers; authors; and Amazon.

You know what it doesn’t benefit?

P-books.

That’s always been one of the publishers’ concerns with Amazon pricing many new and popular e-books at $9.99 (which sometimes meant Amazon was selling them to consumers for less than what the e-tailer paid the publisher). It’s “price perception devaluation.” If a Stephen King novel is worth $9.99 as an e-book, why is it worth $25 as a p-book?

If e-book prices set the market perception of what a book should cost, it hurts p-books.

You might think that would hurt Amazon as much as it does the tradpubs (traditional  publishers), but tradpubs have a massive percentage of p-book sales in brick-and-mortar stores (and those do still matter), and a likely significantly decreasing percentage of e-book sales.

I was a brick-and-mortar bookstore manager…and almost all of our stock came from the biggest publishers (the few that didn’t came from smaller traditional publishers, represented by a distributor such as Publishers Group West).

We simply needed the size and services of the big tradpubs. You need to be able to replenish stock quickly when a book is hot, and get credit for copies when a book is cold.

The smaller independent publishers didn’t have the resources to do that.

All of that goes away with digital reproduction and distribution.

The Big Five’s power is disproportionately in p-books…and POD (Print On Demand) hasn’t changed that (yet).

The other thing Amazon says in the post is that the publisher should get 35%, Amazon should get 30%…and the author should get 35%.

To me, that’s a little…manipulative, I guess. Amazon (as they say later in the post) can’t control how much the author gets from the publisher…that’s a matter of their contracts.

It would be like…looking over at another table at a restaurant, and saying to the six-year old, “You know, if your parents really loved you, they’d give you the whole pizza.” ;)

Authors, of course, are not like six-year olds…I expect we’ll see some pointed comments from some of the Hachette-side authors about this part of the post.

Brand new or aspiring indie-authors may have the relative “life experience” of a six-year old, in terms of publishing, but they’ll have different abilities to judge.

Speaking of those indie (independent) authors, you may think that what Amazon is saying isn’t unreasonable: after all, Amazon pays KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing) authors either 35% or 70% (the latter if they meet certain guidelines).

Yes, but that’s a different case from Amazon’s traditional publishing efforts.

With KDP, the author/publisher (they are often one and the same in that situation) takes on the costs and risks of development of the book. Amazon takes on some of the marketing costs, although the publisher will many times continue to have those as well. Amazon will also have Customer Service costs, and accounting costs, but for the bulk of the costs, it falls on the indie.

KDP is a platform: the author delivers the book and updates it as needed, and Amazon sells it.

Amazon’s traditional publishing, and the Big Five’s, involves a lot more investment.

The other thing about pricing is that consumers (and Amazon is positioning itself as seeing things from that viewpoint) look at an individual sale, while publishers (and stores) look at populations of sales.

Popular books support unpopular books.

As readers, we do want publishers interested in something besides profits on each title.

We want them to take risks on new authors, and we want them to publish “meaningful” books which won’t be popular.

If a researcher spends ten years documenting working conditions in 19th Century America (I’m just making that up as a topic), it’s not going to top the bestseller lists…but it’s important that the information be out there and preserved.

That book will probably never make back its developments costs…so popular books have to be priced somewhat higher to enable the publisher to take a loss on the “public good” book.

That’s not inherently different on e-books and p-books…except that the risks are quite a bit lower on e-books.

Right now, it’s likely that e-books are, to some extent, supporting the publishing of p-books. They are providing, if not a higher margin, a better cushion for taking risks on the development of p-books.

All of that said, this is an extraordinarily revealing post, as far as Amazon goes.

What do you think? Will it persuade the public to be more on Amazon’s side? How will authors react? Would consistently lower e-book prices hurt p-book sales? Would that cause publishers to take fewer risks with p-books, resulting in less innovation? Would indies pick up that slack? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

KDD: The Hunger Games for $1.99

July 29, 2014

KDD: The Hunger Games for $1.99

One of today’s

Kindle Daily Deals (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

is Suzanne Collins’

The Hunger Games (at AmazonSmile)

for $1.99.

As always, check the price before you click or tap that Buy button…the price may not apply in your country (I have readers all over the world), or you may be seeing this after the sale has ended (it is a Kindle Daily Deal, after all).

This is a book beloved by many. In the more than five (!) years since its initial release (someone who was thirteen and read it when it first came out could be voting by now), it has remained popular. The third movie based on the series (there are two more books in The Hunger Games trilogy) will likely be one of the biggest movies this year, and was a buzzy property at the just ended San Diego Comic Con.

I wrote my own review of it in this blog more than two and a half years ago:

Review: The Hunger Games

Outside the value of the book as a book, it’s an important example of something else.

Its publisher, Scholastic, is not one of the Big Five…but it is a large publisher with major bestsellers.

They don’t fall in line with the Big Five, often giving customers benefits that the Big Five tend not to do.

They weren’t part of the Department of Justice legal action against publishers and Apple for price-fixing: they didn’t do the Agency Model.

Programs in which they participate in the Kindle Store (and specifically on The Hunger Games):

  • Text-to-speech access is not blocked…you can listen to being read to you by software
  • X-ray is enabled, meaning you can get information about the characters and other elements
  • It has “real page numbers”
  • Lending is enabled: you can loan the book (once, for fourteen days) to someone not on your account
  • Eligible Prime members can borrow the book as part of the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library
  • You can read the book at no additional cost as part of Kindle Unlimited
  • It has Whispersync for Voice (which also means you can listen to an audiobook version at no additional cost as part of KU)

Scholastic (in business since 1920) doing all of this (and participating in community programs), while keeping customers and (as far as I know) authors happy puts the big challenge to the Big Five…why can’t they do it, too?

However you’d like to get the book, be it purchasing it or borrowing it, enjoy!

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Fire Phone: first impressions and tips

July 29, 2014

Fire Phone: first impressions and tips

I’ve had my

Amazon Fire Phone (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

since Thursday, which has given me an opportunity to use it over the weekend and at work.

I can say that the best is yet to come. ;)

This is a new and radically different device. Think of the people who bought the first automobiles, before there were purpose built roads. They had to bounce and rattle along over streets intended for entirely different vehicles. It wasn’t until people responded to the invention that it became completely indispensable.

At this point, the Fire Phone’s two breakthrough features (Firefly and Dynamic Perspective, which I call “dyper”) are like that.

I’m coming to the Fire Phone from a Galaxy S4…and I have an iPhone 5S that I use for work. The iPhone is new for me (the way Apple handled e-books left a bad taste in my mouth for their products), but I do have some experience with it.

I wouldn’t say I’m a power user of SmartPhones: not like I am with Kindles. However, I do know what I’m doing and I use them quite a bit.

At first, I found the Fire Phone’s interface less easy to use than my S4. After doing more research, playing around with it, and making a couple of calls to Mayday (the almost instant live online screen tech help…which is a huge plus for the FP over anything else), it’s growing on me.

It does all of the basics fine: e-mail, calendar, text.

The navigation is new. Without learning that, the phone can seem frustrating, like it takes a lot of steps to get anywhere.

Let’s talk this through.

The way I have the phone set, I turn it on by pushing a power button once…reasonable.

The lock screens look amazing! They have dyper…just by moving my head, I can see more of the image. For example, I have a neon sign up right now, like a tourist trap in the desert (it includes the date and time). By moving my head (even from probably half a meter away from the phone), I can see the streetlamps which are otherwise off the screen. I can see how many new e-mails I have, the signal strength and battery level.

To unlock it, I swipe up from the bottom…that’s an adjustment for me, I’m used to going side to side. However, as an ambidexter, I appreciate that it isn’t better for right or left handers. :)

I’ve put a password on mine.

Once it opens up, there is a Carousel, like there is an a Kindle Fire. It’s going to be easier for Kindle Fire users to adapt to this phone than other people.

At the bottom of the screen are four icons:

  • Phone
  • Messaging
  • Email
  • Silk Browser

Here’s the first thing you might not realize.

Swipe those four icons up, and you’ll be on the apps screen.

It will default to being the apps on your device, but you can switch it to the Cloud easily enough (it’s an obvious choice in your top left corner).

Okay, here’s are a few gestural things on this homescreen which aren’t intuitive.

In addition to swiping from the left or right side, you can just “flick” the phone.

Flick it where you are turning the phone with a rapid motion with the left side getting closer to you, and you reveal the main navigation. That has

  • APPS
  • GAMES
  • WEB
  • MUSIC
  • VIDEOS
  • PHOTOS
  • BOOKS
  • NEWSSTAND
  • AUDIOBOOKS
  • DOCS
  • SHOP
  • PRIME

Flick it back to remove that menu.

Generally, that left menu will be available in most places you are working, and will be the same.

Flick it the other way, with the right side getting closer to you, and you’ll reveal a context sensitive menu…one that varies depending on what you are doing.

ON the home screen, I get a weather report (which I could set to be in Celsius, my favorite…and which autodetected my location), and Google Now type cards. Right now, I’m seeing calendar events, but I may see an e-mail from people I designate, or texts. There is an ellipsis (“…”) at the bottom to go to the full calendar.

Flick left, flick right: two of the main gestures.

Three other big gestures:

Tip the phone to one side (either direction), and you’ll see a ribbon at the top with quick access to functions:

  • Airplane mode
  • Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • Flashlight
  • Sync
  • Settings
  • Mayday
  • Search
  • Brightness

How would you know what they were?

You peek.

Really, that’s what they call it.

Move your head to the side and look back at the phone, like you are trying to look behind the icons.

The captions magically appear.

You’ll use that a lot.

The last gesture I’ll mention is how to get back to what you were doing last.

The first couple of days, I really missed the Back button on my S4. Then, one of the Mayday reps told me that you can swipe up from the bottom of the screen. They didn’t describe it quite right: the thing is that you start off the edge of the screen at the bottom, at about the same level as the home button. Then swipe up on to the screen: that will take you back to the last function.

Before I go on, let me say that is seems to drink battery charge like a Chevrolet Suburban drinks gasoline! ;) Just while I’ve been writing this post, it went down four percent. I expect that will get better after I play with some settings.

In terms of the pre–installed apps, I recommend that you play with Clay Doodle and Monkey Buddy (although the latter might drive you crazy, if you are an adult). The first one is like Play-Doh, and takes advantage of the dyper. The second one is a virtual pet, like a Tamagotchi in concept. Since it can see where you head is, it responds to you nodding your head yes in approval, for example.

Believe it or not, the integration with Amazon could be better. My Prime music wasn’t available until I downloaded an app…that was weird. My biggest disappointment so far has been that gestural scrolling doesn’t work in the Kindle app! It only works in Silk on websites.

I was really looking forward to having an endless scroll in my Kindle books, where I could get to the next text by just moving my head or tilting the phone.

A Mayday rep told me that an update is coming soon which will include more functionality…and better interface with the Kindle app is one of the things we may see. Right now, you can get the X-Ray background data by flicking from the right…good to know, right? :)

I may do a full menu map at some point (that kind of thing might make a good short “book” for people to borrow through Kindle Unlimited), but let’s go through the settings at a high level:

Wi-Fi & Networks

  • Connect to Wi-Fi
  • Enable Airplane Mode
  • Pair Bluetooth Devices
  • Set up a Wi-Fi hotspot (only if that’s part of your data plan, I think)
  • Enable NFC (Near Field Communication)
  • Turn off cellular dta usage
  • See your cellular data usage
  • Change your mobile network operator

Display

  • Adjust screen brightness
  • Turn off automatic screen rotation
  • Hide (or show…the commands change based on current state) status bar
  • Change time to sleep
  • Share your screen via Miracast
  • Configure low motion settings (this will turn off some of the gestural stuff, which would be useful for those with unsteady hands or heads)

Sounds & Notifications

  • Change your ringtone
  • Manage notifications
  • Select ringtones for specific people
  • Select text message tones for specific people
  • Change volume levels (there  are also physical volume buttons)
  • Change touch feedback settings (my first call to Mayday: how to turn off hepatic feedback, the vibrating you get when you touch a key…I just don’t like it, and it uses battery charge)

Applications & Parental Controls

  • Configure Amazon application settings
  • Manage applications
  • Prevent (or enable) non-Amazon app installation
  • Turn off product recommendations
  • Enable Parental Controls

Battery & Storage

  • View battery usage (the system is taking 50% of my usage right now)
  • View available storage
  • Free space on your phone (not how much you have…this one is designed to free up space)
  • Change USB connection type

Location Services

  • Configure Location Based Services for your applications
  • Enable Enhanced Location Services
  • Disable Find My Device (enabled by default)

Lock Screen

  • Select a lock screen scene (the default is that it changes every day)
  • Set a password or PIN (Personal Identification Number)
  • Change the automatic lock time
  • Turn off (or on) notifications on the lock screen

Keyboard

  • Change the keyboard language
  • Configure auto-correct and spell-checking
  • Manage advanced keyboard features
  • Edit your personal dictionary

Phone

  • Configure call waiting
  • Configure caller ID
  • Forward incoming calls
  • Edit Reply-with-Text messages
  • View your phone number
  • Set up voicemail
  • Contact your carrier

My Accounts

  • Deregister your phone
  • Manage e-mail accounts
  • Connect your social networks
  • Manage your Amazon account
  • Manage your Amazon payment method
  • Manage your Amazon Newsstand subscriptions
  • Manage your Send-to-Device email address

Device

  • Change the date and time
  • Disable auto backups
  • Change your language
  • Install system updates
  • Factory reset your phone
  • Get info about your Fire
  • Configure your emergency alerts
  • View your emergency alerts
  • Manage your SIM (Subscriber Identification Module) card PIN
  • Manage enterprise security features
  • Manage accessibility (it has nice magnifier features…I turned  those  on)
  • View Legal and Compliance Info

Voice

  • Configure voice settings (oh, it does take voice commands…hold down the home button, like accessing Siri. I have found that I have to say “Search the Web” to get it to do that…it doesn’t just guess that’s what you want if you say something for which it doesn’t have a command)
  • Change Text to Speech (TTS) language (it does have TTS for Kindle books…it comes with English and Spanish, but you can download quite a few others for no additional cost)

Help & Feedback

  • Get help from Mayday (there is a lifesaver for that on the quick access ribbon…remember, you can tip your phone quickly for that, or swipe down from the top. Use it to get the most out of your phone)
  • Browse online help
  • Contact Amazon technical support
  • Provide feedback

There, that gives you a pretty good idea of its capabilities.

Overall, I’m starting to like it. If you want everything to be easy, if you want it to be as good as the most popular other phones, you may not want to be an early adopter. You can download apps to do things it doesn’t do right now (in many cases), but a year from now, it will be much more capable…I suspect it will be a lot more capable before the holidays.

It’s certainly satisfactory…and the hardware (the four cameras that enable dyper) and Firefly (the real world recognition system) promise much greater things in the future, once people start designing for it. The killer apps are yet to come.

I think it’s a great first SmartPhone (which is where I think the market is), and an adequate transition phone (with amazing potential).

Hey, my Kindle app has an update available! That sort of thing is going to happen a lot…I won’t focus on the Fire Phone a lot in this blog (just as I haven’t done that with the Fire Phone), but it is a Kindle reading device, and  I think it deserves some coverage here.

If you have any specific questions about it, or things to say, feel free to comment on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

KU titles dominate paid bestseller list

July 28, 2014

KU titles dominate paid bestseller list

One of my regular readers and commenters, Tom Semple, noted that there seemed to be a lot of Kindle Unlimited titles on the Amazon Kindle bestseller list.

The books in

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

can be borrowed by customers who pay $9.99 a month for the service (although there is a free month available right now). The publishers are compensated with a royalty based on when the customer has read 10% of the book.

Would that count as a sale for the paid bestseller list (as opposed to the free list)?

I have asked Amazon, but haven’t heard back yet…and they might not reveal that information (I’m sure they wouldn’t be obligated to do so).

So, I thought I’d take a look at the paid and free bestseller lists, and see how KU titles are represented.

Let’s start with the paid list. I’ll indicate if it is KU or not, and if there is an icon (there isn’t alway) indicating if it has been rising or falling:

  1. KU, rising
  2. KU, none
  3. KU, rising
  4. Not KU, falling
  5. KU, none
  6. KU, rising
  7. Not KU, falling
  8. KU, rising
  9. Not KU, rising
  10. Not KU, falling (recent freebie)
  11. Not KU, falling
  12. Not KU, falling
  13. KU, falling
  14. Not KU, falling
  15. Not KU, falling
  16. KU, falling
  17. Not KU, none
  18. KU, rising
  19. KU, rising
  20. Not KU, falling

Well, that’s pretty obvious!

Seven books are shown as rising…and six of them are KU!

It certainly suggests that KU books are pushing traditionally published (by places other than Amazon) down the Kindle paid bestseller list.

That’s not good for discovery for the tradpubs (traditional publishers)!

The Goldfinch (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) by Donna Tartt (a Pulitzer Prize winning novel) is down to #11.

How does it look on the free list?

  1. KU
  2. KU
  3. KU
  4. Not KU
  5. KU
  6. KU
  7. KU
  8. KU
  9. Not KU
  10. Not KU
  11. Not KU
  12. Not KU
  13. Not KU
  14. Not KU
  15. KU
  16. Not KU
  17. KU
  18. KU
  19. Not KU
  20. KU

Interesting that so many more of the freebies are not Kindle Unlimited…no icons for rising and falling on that list that I saw.

I also have to tell you: the list order changed while I was compiling the second list: it’s done every hour. I think it’s a pretty good representation, though.

My guess is that KU counts as sales (at least at the ten percent point), and not as freebies.

It would be possible that the initial KU download is a freebie “sale” and the 10% point is a paid sale, but I doubt that.

The ones that are not KU on the free list may not be in KDP Select, meaning that they aren’t exclusive to Amazon, and also would not be available through the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library.

Indies and Amazon tradpubs have been pretty well represented on the paid bestseller list before, but this does really look different to me…especially with the trending indicators being what they are.

If KU books really are causing even a relative drop on the Kindle store bestseller lists for tradpubs, there has to be some worrying going on at the Big Five, and some high fiving at Amazon.

I may look at this in more depth later, and it’s possible that there is an initial rush to borrow from the KU which may slow down (especially if there doesn’t continue to be a first free month available), but this really could be seen as a turning point for publishing.

If this looks like a significant enough trend, it might even give Amazon leverage in dealing with Hachette, and the with the other publishers.

It wouldn’t be enough to end anything…but it could portend some real changes in readers acquisition habits.

Thanks for suggesting I look at this, Tom!

Update: Amazon has responded to my inquiry, and it confirms (and clarifies) what I thought was probably happening:

“Hello,

If your book is borrowed from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library or Kindle Unlimited, the borrow will affect your book’s sales rank the same way a normal sale would.

When a Kindle Unlimited customer chooses your book for the first time and reads more than 10% of it, their choice qualifies as a borrow and toward royalty payment for you. Customers can always read your book again, as many times as they like, but that won’t qualify toward your royalty payments. You can even choose your own book and receive one royalty payment—as long as you’re reading it only for the first time, and read more than 10% of it.

These requirements apply to books in both the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library and Kindle Unlimited.”

That means that KU and the KOLL are affecting the paid bestseller list and not the free bestseller list. The impact on the paid bestseller list is significant and will add significant momentum to the “discovery of disruption”, to coin a phrase.

People will continue to do things the way they usually do things, unless something changes them. As a trainer, that’s a major part of the challenge of my profession.

Are people trained to buy things from major publishers? I’d argue “no”: they are trained to buy things in certain places and certain ways…and that includes getting them from the bestseller list.

I don’t think most people look at the top ten bestsellers, and then look at the publisher to make a buying decision. Yes, I do think they look at authors, but I would guess that buying an interesting title from the top ten is a common purchasing habit for folks.

If KU disrupts the top ten, that will disproportionalize the non-tradpubs versus the tradpubs…which will in turn tend to move the former up the lists. It becomes a “virtuous cycle” for Amazon and indies…the more books on the bestseller list due to KU means that more of those books will be bought outside of the KU…which will make them again more likely to be on the bestseller list, which means…well, you get the idea.

Sure you want to ignore this, Big Five? I go back to what I suggested before: we may see non-canonical works (short stories, reference works) to major series in the KU, with the main books staying outside of it. That gives the tradpubs discovery (and in a big way…how many people would borrow a story about Grandma Mazur from Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series…when she was in college? I’m guessing that would sit right on the top of the KU list. It wouldn’t have to be long…if you don’t pay additionally for it, who cares if it is ten “pages” long?), and could give Amazon exactly the kind of material it wants in KU. With that, they could even work out exclusivity…Janet Evanovich could indie publish it with the author’s tradpub’s tacit approval.

What do you think? Are you borrowing books from Kindle Unlimited? Have you borrowed when you would otherwise have bought a book (the same one or a different one) from a tradpub? What will be the “stickiness” of KU? In other words, what percentage of people who try the free month will keep it to pay for at least one month? Feel free to tell me and my readers what you think by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 

Binge reading with Kindle Unlimited #1

July 27, 2014

Binge reading with Kindle Unlimited #1

While “binge watching” entire TV series may be all the rage, serious readers have been “binge reading” for decades.

Many of us have picked a series and just plowed through them, start to finish.

How many of you had a “Summer of Sherlock”, where you decided you’d read all the original Sherlock Holmes books?

No?

Gee, where else were you during the summer…on the beach? ;)

I once read three and a half novels in the same series in one day…that’s my record, by the way. ;)

It was

The Expendables by Richard Avery (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*) (not available for the Kindle)

I’m not going to pretend that they were “thick” reading (like War and Peace or The Lord of the Rings): they are definitely “popcorn books”, plain and simple. They are meant to be snacks…finish one, on to the next, like a bag of potato chips. :)

However, I’ve also read much more serious books…and again, right through the series.

Generally, I don’t want to start a series unless I have access to all of them, and I can start at the beginning.

In the past, that has been challenging, though.

For one thing, it could be a big investment before I even knew if I liked it.

Let’s say a series had ten books in it, and I could get the paperbacks for $5 each. I’d have to invest $50 before I’d even start reading the first one.

Well, okay, I can’t say I’d really go that far all the time. :) I often would read the first book in the series first…and then, if I decided to go for it, buy the other nine.

So, only $45 at a time. ;)

Kindle Unlimited (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

changes those calculations.

I don’t have to worry about how much each book in the series costs.

I can choose to read a series, and go for it.

Yes, you can only have ten books out at a time, but unless you are going somewhere where you won’t have access to the internet (even without wireless, you can typically use a computer to download books from Amazon and then transfer them via USB), that’s not a problem. You just keep returning books as you finish them and you can keep taking more out.

There is the risk that you are part way through a series and the other books get removed from Kindle Unlimited…books are going to come in and out of it. If there’s a series where Amazon is the publisher now, that doesn’t mean that they will be later…licensing can change hands.

Still, I don’t think that’s a huge risk.

I thought I’d give you some suggestions for binge reading.

One fun thing: for $9.99 a month (and free for the first month right now), you could race other people on the account. ;) Typically, a book can be on six devices on the account at the same time, at no additional cost. If a book does have a different number of “simultaneous device licenses”, it will say so on the book’s Amazon product page…none of that changes with KU.

However, you can’t return the first book in the series until everyone is done with it, or they won’t be able to finish it. So, if the fastest person reads more than ten times faster than the slowest person, the speedy one will have to wait until that slower one finishes the first book. Of course, you could always buy it…that’s going to happen with some KU books.

Let’s look at some of these series (and other groupings)!

Blow your mind with Philip K. Dick

I can’t imagine what it would be like if you read ten PKD books in a row! I have to believe that virtually everyone would come out of that changed. Reality can be so warped in these…many people struggle to get through one. That’s not because the writing is bad, but because you put yourself in someone else’s head when you read, and PKD’s is like that feeling you get on the teacup ride at Disneyland. ;)

Search for PKD in KU (at AmazonSmile)

That search has 63 results, although some are false positives (they aren’t really PKD). They also don’t have all the books. I’d say try these first:

  • Valis
  • The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch
  • Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said
  • Total Recall
  • We Can Build You

From there, you can just keep going. :)

Harry Potter

If you haven’t read Harry Potter, here’s a great opportunity! We paid more than $9.99 for each book when they were released. You could borrow them one a month through the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, but wouldn’t it be fun to read all of the original seven on a week’s vacation?

Search for Harry Potter in KU (at AmazonSmile)

What if you have already read them?

That’s where KU really works!

There are 154 results in that search! Again, some are false positives, but there is a whole series of interactive quiz books, Harry Potter cookbooks, parodies, analyses…you might never buy a book on the sociology of Harry Potter, or the “magickal spirituality”, but at this “smorgasbook”, you can just toss them on your plate. Would you buy a book on how to host a Harry Potter party? Maybe not, but you could borrow one from KU if the event is on your calendar.

87th Precinct

Do you really want to disappear into another world for awhile?

You can read more than forty books in the classic series by Ed McBain:

Search for 87th Precinct in KU (at Amazon Smile)

Maybe you aren’t going read them all at once. :) Maybe you read them on your public transit commute (or listen to them in the car…that’s what I do). If you get through one book a week that way, you could commute to work and to the 87th Precinct at the same time…for the best part of a year.

Learn something new with lots of perspectives

Something else you can do with KU is pick a non-fiction topic, and read and discard books as soon as you want. Sure, you could do something like that with free samples, but what if the part you want to learn isn’t in the first ten percent (or so) of the book?

For example, suppose you want to publish your own book in the Kindle store (or elsewhere). There are hundreds of results in this

Search for publish your book in KU (at AmazonSmile)

If all you want to know about is how to promote a book by going to conventions, you can hop and skip from book to book.

I definitely plan to give you more suggestions for binge reading in Kindle Unlimited in the future, but let me also ask you: what would you recommend to me and my readers? I tend to read several books at the same time (those wouldn’t be books in the same fiction series), but I love to find series that can be in that mix. Feel free to make your recommendations known by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Amazon’s Q2 Financials: net loss 18 times larger than last year

July 26, 2014

Amazon’s Q2 Financials: net loss 18 times larger than last year

Customers can be happy about all of the money Amazon is investing to make their lives better. They are spending money on more content at no more cost (for example, hundreds of thousands of more songs for Prime Music), they continue to update devices, they are introducing new devices which lets us do things more of the same way in more places (which is easier).

Investors may not feel the same way about it, though.

Let’s take a stand-out figure, according to this

press release

“Net loss was $126 million in the second quarter, or $0.27 per diluted share, compared with net loss of $7 million, or $0.02 per diluted share, in second quarter 2013.”

That’s a big proportional difference: as I mentioned in the subject of this post, it’s eighteen times larger.

However, a loss of $126 million just isn’t that much for a company the size of Amazon.

The big thing, of course, is that we have to believe that this is an extraordinary circumstance and not a trend.

After, all if the losses continued to grow at the same rate, they would lose two BILLION, two-hundred and sixty-eight million dollars in the second quarter of 2015…and then you’d be talking real money. ;)

Of course, that’s not likely.

Amazon just introduced a whole new hardware line for them with the

Amazon Fire Phone (at AmazonSmile)

Mine arrived yesterday (I’ll make some comments about it at the end of this post).

That’s a very big investment. It’s not just development: I’ve seen full page ads in magazines, for example, and that’s not a cheap thing to do.

Starting up a new service like

Kindle Unlimited

also has significant costs.

So, what did investors think about this?

This

CNN Money graph

shows a drop of 9.65% today…which comes with the smell of fear.

Now, that may bounce back, but my intuition is that investors are actually becoming even less secure with Amazon right now.

What does that mean for customers?

I suspect we may go into a “building” year where there aren’t any more radical product launches (that doesn’t mean we wouldn’t get a new Kindle Fire or Paperwhite…but that they won’t launch any more hardware lines).

They need to show that some of these risks are going to pay off. They need to show a record of success for Kindle Unlimited with an indicator of continued success.

They need the Fire Phone to be accepted and to be in a position for growth (the AT&T exclusivity is likely to only be for a year).

Amazon Web Services (AWS) needs to show it is a solid income stream going forward.

None of this concerns me for the viability of Amazon long-term…but we may see them painting the boats rather than launching new ones for a little while.

You can listen to the webcast of the conference call here:

http://edge.media-server.com/m/p/drh3z532/lan/en

Often the Q&A (Questions and Answers) portion is the best part…there is an index and you can jump right to that, if you want, but I didn’t hear any bombshells in it this time.

I’m actually listening to it right now on my Fire Phone.

I need to use it more until I can give you a real report on it (I’ll use it more over the weekend).

Let’s start out with a few things:

It works. :)

It sounds fine as a phone, I set up my e-mail, texting, and calendars. I was able to import everything pretty painlessly from my Samsung Galaxy S4 (which I hate to give up). I was already on AT&T, and they have a wireless transfer app that moves things between the two phones.

I did have one weird thing. Since I’d ordered the phone on one phone number on the account (which was eligible for an upgrade), but wanted it to work on another phone line, I had to call AT&T. The rep there was great, by the way! Surprisingly good.

The negative was that I needed the number on the SIM card on the new phone…and I could not get it to come out of the phone! I actually ended up calling Mayday on my

Kindle Fire HDX (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

It was kind of funny, because I had the AT&T rep on speaker phone, and that person could hear the Mayday person.

However, try as I might, I couldn’t get the SIM out. Fortunately, I found the number on one edge of the box for the phone…but I still haven’t gotten th SIM card out.

As to the “dy-per” (what I call Dynamic Perspective)…so far, it’s cool, but I wouldn’t feel like I need it. When I’m looking at the sleep screen, I can tilt the phone to see more of the scene. That’s a little hard to describe…it’s like when you were a kid, and you put your face right up to the mirror and were surprised that you could see things “in the mirror” that weren’t directly in front of it…suggesting it was actually showing you another world. Oh, was that just me? ;)

The Carousel, though, looks really busy. I have to check on how to maybe eliminate some of the data.

For example, if I swipe over to the messaging icon, the most recent messages show below that icon. Same thing with e-mail, the Help menu, Settings…it’s sort of like “customers also buy” on the Kindle Fire HDX…but there is a lot of text.

I haven’t seen it react to where I’m looking, yet, outside of dyper..and I’d really like to be able to scroll my book by looking! I may have to Mayday that (the Help search is unimpressive).

Flicking left and right does bring up some useful things…but it’s so far hard to predict when it will work or what it will show. I think that will come in time (I haven’t used it for a total of two hours of actual interaction time yet). There are people who still don’t right-click…you have to use it to get used to it. ;)

While you would think that this would integrate super well with Amazon’s stuff, I haven’t found Prime Music yet…despite looking for it for a few minutes. I can find my other music, but not Prime.

The other big feature that make the phone a stand-out is Firefly, the “real world recognition” functionality.

I pointed it at a superhero sticker today…it thought it was looking at a thermos with that superhero.

I pointed it at a can of Dust-Off which I had bought from Amazon: it first linked me to an inhalant abuse website that was on the can, then I repointed it at the SKU (the zebra stribe Stock Unit number) and it got it then.

It also got a toner cartridge package…again, by pointing it at the SKU.

I think at this point, the features are ahead of the functionality: I suspect there will be some killer apps for both Firefly and dyper, but casual use of the phone at this stage may not reveal their power.

What do you think? Do you have specific questions about the Fire Phone? Will Amazon raise consumer prices to make lower losses for investors? Feel free to let me and my readers know by commenting on this post.

Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Comic Con inspired bargains

July 23, 2014

Comic Con inspired bargains

Tonight is the preview night for

San Diego Comic Con (SDCC)

which is one of the biggest pop culture events of the year.

In fact, it’s big enough that companies tie into it with merchandise/content sales…and not just on comics.

The con itself certainly goes beyond comic books/graphic novels. Some old timers complain that it has become too much about movies and TV…even ones that aren’t even especially geeky (and I use that adjective as a proud geek).

Authors of text-based books (you know…what many people just call “books”) ;) also appear: Diana Gabaldon, Robin Hobb, Jim Butcher, and more. Even the publishers (Simon & Schuster, Penguin Random House) have panels.

So, through this weekend, we’ll be able to find bargains…even if they don’t specifically say they are there because of Comic Con, that may be the case.

For example, one of today’s Kindle Daily Deals is

Batman Day graphic novels sale (at AmazonSmile: benefit a non-profit of your choice by shopping*)

This is Batman’s 75th anniversary year..the Dark Knight (or Caped Crusader…depends a bit on your perspective) debuted in what is sometimes considered the best pop culture year, 1939.

Batman (along with Superman) certainly seems to have taken some inspiration from Doc Savage (Doc was a wealthy crimefighter with specialized vehicles and equipment…including a “utility vest”, which arguably became Batman’s utility belt), but that’s another story. :)

There have been some Batman graphic novels that are really considered classic by Batman fans…and yes, they are included here for $2.99 each.

That includes:

  • Batman: The Dark Knight by Frank Miller
  • Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore

If you’ve never read a graphic novel, I’d recommend The Dark Knight…and warn you ahead of time, those two in particular are not written for children.

Amazon is also giving us

Batman Eternal #1 (at AmazonSmile)

for free!

You need to enter a promotional code (BATMAN75) first…you can see all the details here:

Batman Eternal #1 promo detail page (at AmazonSmile)

I suspect we’ll see more related specials over the next few days in the

Kindle Daily Deals (at AmazonSmile)

Another place at Amazon where we’ll see savings through the weekend, and these may be explicitly SDCC deals, is

The Geek Boutique (at AmazonSmile)

One more thing before I leave Amazon. Here’s a link for

Prime Video Comic-Con Favorites (at AmazonSmile)

If you are an eligible Prime member, you can watch these at no additional cost…and there are 227 results at time of writing.

Let’s move off of Amazon for a minute to go to Marvel.

Marvel has “Marvel Unlimited”, which you can think of as similar to Kindle Unlimited…just for digital Marvel comics.

Normally, that’s $9.99 a month. It includes a lot of comics…typically, you can expect that when a Marvel comic is six months past its publication date, it may appear here.

As a special tie-in to SDCC, though, you can get the first month for $0.99!

You can have 12 comics out at a time (KU allows ten titles).

You can get more information on it here:

http://marvel.com/mu?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=AcquisitionEmail&utm_content=072314EMSubscribeNow&utm_campaign=SDCC14

The necessary app isn’t in the Amazon Appstore, but you could get it at

1Mobile

Amazon allows us to install apps from “unknown sources” on our Kindle Fires, but you have to make the call. Since the app won’t have been reviewed by Amazon to make sure it is safe and that it works on the KFire, you take responsibility for that.

This is one where I would feel comfortable getting it, and I have gotten things for my KFire from 1Mobile before.

You can count on bargains from other geeky sites, too, like

ThinkGeek.com

and

SuperHeroStuff.com

Enjoy!

Bonus story:

In a

press release

today, Amazon announced that it has added hundreds of thousands of songs to Prime Music (at AmazonSmile)…and hundreds of playlists.

That’s the no additional cost streaming music for eligible Amazon Prime members.

In my recent post

A Day in the Life of a Kindleer 2014

I didn’t talk about using Prime Music, but I have used it sporadically…I sometimes write with it on, for example.

It looks like Prime Music has been quite successful. Adding hundreds of thousands of songs to it is great! I haven’t been terribly impressed with their playlists, although it is nice to have fifty songs of one genre play with one selection. I’m just not sure that I’m seeing genuine creativity n how songs are grouped together in the playlists. I some cases, they seem a bit more like…search results, rather than curated music lists.

For example, the press release mentions one called “Fire for Your Fire”, and describes it as “Odes to all things fire make perfect listening on your Fire Phone or Kindle Fire”. I’m guessing that it’s just a bunch of songs with “fire” in the title, although I’m not seeing it yet on the site.

Curation seems to be better at Songza, but this is new for Amazon. One thing they could do is let customers share playlists, then have people “like” them…and with enough likes, a playlist moves up into a better discovery spot. That would create social engagement, and probably result in better playlists.

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

Kindle Unlimited: how does it affect authors, and what’s the deal with the KOLL?

July 23, 2014

Kindle Unlimited: how does it affect authors, and what’s the deal with the KOLL?

You know that look Indiana Jones has in that one scene, where the  adventuring archaeologist  thinks everything cool, and suddenly, it all goes reverse  Sisyphus? ;)

That’s the look a lot of the book industry still has after Amazon introduced its subser (that’s what I call a subscription service) for e-books and audiobooks for adults.

I’ve already written about it more than once, but there’s a lot more to say since I wrote

It’s official! Kindle Unlimited is here with 639,621 titles

way back on…Friday. ;)

I said at that point I was going to address how this was affecting authors, and that’s going to be one of the two parts of this post.

A lot of people want to know if this is good or bad for authors, and like almost everything, in my opinion, it’s both.

My guess is that some authors are going to see tremendous increases in revenue by being part of Kindle Unlimited (KU). Others, rightfully, are concerned about the restrictions involved.

Let’s first lay things out a bit.

Authors get paid for the sale of the books they’ve written. In the traditionally publishing world, they licensed the rights to sell the book to a publisher (the deal was usually made by an agent acting on the author’s behalf), which sold the books to stores, which then sold them to customers.

A tradpub (traditional publisher) might give the author an advance against the royalties. Let’s say that you could be reasonably sure that Stephen King was going to sell a million copies of the next novel, and that you knew as the publisher you could get $10 per copy (I’m basically working with this as a hardback for this example). $2.50 of that is going to go to King.

However, the author needs a year to write the book, and needs to spend that year largely unconcerned about earning a living besides that.

You are looking at getting in $7.5 million…you’ll have expenses out of that, of course, including the actual manufacture of the book and marketing, but you’ll advance King $1 million.

The first million dollars which would have gone to King from the royalties once the book starts actually selling, you keep to pay off the advance.

So, that’s one model.

In the independent (“indie”) e-book model, the author may publish the book themselves, going perhaps through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. The author, following certain guidelines, can get 70% of the list price they set for the book. Sell it for $2.99, keep about $2.09. Of course, the author has also taken on all the expenses: they might have paid for an editor, done marketing, and so on.

If the indie set the price outside of the $2.99 to $9.99 range, they can only get 35% for it…that’s going to become important as this explanation continues.

When Amazon introduced the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL) in 2011, they created a new income stream for authors.

Eligible Amazon Prime members with a hardware Kindle can borrow up to a book a month from a certain set of books.

The indie publishers (and those might be just individual authors) divide a variable pool of money, getting a cut of it for each borrow that happens.

Let’s say the pool is $1.5 million for January. If there were 750,000 borrows that month, everybody in the pool gets $2 for each borrow. If your book was borrowed ten times, you get $20. That $2 figure is close to what it has been actually running.

That’s a big plus if someone borrows a $0.99 book: $2 instead of $0.35. It’s about a wash with a $2.99 book that meets the other requirements to get 70%.

There are also traditionally published books in the KOLL, although not from the biggest publishers. They get paid differently: they probably mostly get paid like it was a sale, and so the author would get their normal royalty…presumably. Publishers don’t release those kind of contract details, normally.

Now, along comes KU, and the economics change.

The one big technical change is that the indies publishers don’t get a royalty unless someone “reads” ten percent of the book (not based on when they simply download it). I put “reads” in quotation marks, because of course, the system doesn’t know if you actually read it or just flipped through it…or even, I think, jumped ahead to 10%.

That’s not that big a deal, though. I doubt very many people downloaded a KOLL book and didn’t read at least 10% of it.

What makes the difference is the “Unlimited” part.

KU isn’t really unlimited, of course, but it would be unreasonable to think that “unlimited” was a literal term, in my opinion. For example, you can’t go back in time and read the book. ;) You can’t read a book on the surface of the sun. “Kindle Unlimited” is a name, not an actual definition.

In practice, though, it is pretty much all you can read. You can have ten books out at a time. I think that’s to limit the number of people using it, not to limit an individual. I could borrow ten books on August 1st. If I read all ten by August 10th, I could just borrow ten more…it’s not ten per month, it’s ten at a time.

I do find that it feels freeing. I had to make careful choices with the KOLL…I don’t with KU.

That’s going to be a big boon for books which most people would not have bought.

In this

TechCrunch article by John Biggs

In the article, Biggs says:

“My son, for his part, has already downloaded a few dozen Minecraft ebooks…”

A few dozen!

The article also suggests those books may not be that good, but the point is,  that would not have happened without KU.

It wouldn’t have happened with the KOLL: after the first book, you’d have to wait until the next calendar month to get the next one.

Even if we figure they were all ninety-nine cents, we can be sure they wouldn’t have spent more than $30 on them.

Those publishers will all get royalties…and possibly, much bigger royalties than they would have gotten for sales which probably wouldn’t have happened otherwise.

Authors whose books were part of the KDP Select program (that’s what gets indie books into the KOLL) were automatically made part of KU:

“All books currently enrolled in KDP Select with U.S. rights will be automatically included in Kindle Unlimited. KDP Select books will also continue to be enrolled in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL) available to Amazon Prime customers in the U.S., U.K., Germany, France, and Japan where authors will continue to earn a share of the KDP Select global fund when their book is borrowed. KOLL borrows will continue to be counted when a book is initially downloaded.”

–Amazon e-mail

So, why wouldn’t every indie author jump into KU?

There’s one big sticking point.

KU requires exclusivity for Amazon for indies…that’s part of the KDP Select rules.

Put your book in KU (through KDP Select) and you can’t sell it through SmashWords or Barnes & Noble.

I actually think it’s possible that requirement will go away at some point, or at least, have two tiers of royalty for exclusive and non-exclusive.

Obviously, the exclusivity rules don’t apply to tradpubbed books…Harry Potter e-books aren’t exclusive to Amazon, and are part of KU.

So, KU is most beneficial to books which weren’t selling well, and to very low-priced books. It’s not as beneficial to books which do sell well and are higher priced.

How will this affect Big 5 publishers and their brand name authors?

Unless it starts significantly cutting into “piece” sales (buying a book at a time), it doesn’t affect them much. They may think that putting books into KU will cannibalize their piece sales…at least for the frontlist (the new and bestselling books).

If it does start to cut into piece sales…the game changes.

I can imagine that by the end of 2015, 10% of e-book downloads happen through KU.

That’s not ten percent of the income…a lot of those would be books with micro sales.

It could be, then, that a brand name author starts putting short stories and other “peripheral” material to big series into KU.

Not necessarily through their tradpub.

They may correctly feel that so much discovery is happening through KU that they can’t ignore it.

This might also spur a growth of Kindle Worlds (Amazon’s program which licenses books, comic books, TV shows, movies, and so on so that anyone can write in them, following certain guidelines, and the rightsholder, author, and Amazon all get a cut).

A tradpub could license a series to KW, which would then result in non-canonical works in KU…which in turn serves to promote the non-KU books.

The more successful KU is, the more successful it will become.

Now, people are undoubtedly thinking of ways to game the system. I asked Amazon what happens if somebody borrows a book, reads ten percent of it (triggering a payment), returns it, and then borrows it again and again reads ten percent.

One of my regular readers and commenters, Tom Semple, asked what would prevent someone from just asking a bunch of people to borrow it, jump to the ten percent mark, and then return it.

The answer is that Amazon has made it clear that if they decide you are doing things like that, you are out. Naturally, they can always stop carrying someone’s book, they don’t really need a reason. I don’t want to get into any non-public details about this…suffice it so say, they aren’t going to get “tricked” much and suffer the consequences. I think it’s far more likely we will hear about them thinking someone has done something wrong who hasn’t. They are pretty good about taking “appeals” in those cases…but we see it happen on the forum that someone’s posts are deleted, and they never figure out why, for a much smaller example of what might be Amazon being overly cautious.

Now, as to what is happening with the KOLL:

As you can see from the quote from the Amazon e-mail, the KOLL continues to exist: no change at this point.

That said, I’ve seen many threads in the Amazon forums where people think it has been discontinued.

That’s because the interface for getting to it has changed, and that has been affected by KU.

Basically what has happened, according to Amazon (and I asked them a detailed question) is that, if you are a KOLL member who is not eligible for a loan right now (because you’ve already borrowed a book this calendar month), you’ll see the KU “Read for Free” button instead of the KOLL “Borrow for Free”.

According to them, it works like this:

  • A Prime member and eligible for a KOLL loan will see “Borrow for Free” button on Prime eligible titles
  • A Prime member who has hit the KOLL limit will see “Read for Free” with KU eligible titles
  • Someone who is neither a Prime nor a KU member will see “Read for Free” with KU on KU titles which are also Prime titles, and will see “Borrow for Free” with Prime on Prime titles which are non-KU titles
  • Quoting Amazon: “For the E-readers and Kindle Fires, you’ll see the above, except for Kindle Touch and Kindle Paperwhite users will see the “Read for Free” button regardless of their current KOLL status.”

Hypothetically, then, the confusing thing has been that a “borrow” button wasn’t available in the browser, but only when a KOLL loan wasn’t availbale..and Kindle Touch and Kindle Paperwhite users didn’t see a KOLL button regardless.

That doesn’t answer everything: how does a Paperwhite owner make a KOLL borrow? Apparently, from what I’ve heard anecdotally, clicking that “Read for Free” on your Paperwhite will make it the KOLL loan if you haven’t done one yet that month.

I hope that makes it clearer.

What do you think? Is KU a good deal for authors, a bad deal for authors, both or neither? Feel free to let me and my readers know what you think by commenting on this post.

New! Join hundreds of readers and try the free ILMK magazine at Flipboard!

* I am linking to the same thing at the regular Amazon site, and at AmazonSmile. When you shop at AmazonSmile, half a percent of your purchase price on eligible items goes to a non-profit you choose. It will feel just like shopping at Amazon: you’ll be using your same account. The one thing for you that is different is that you pick a non-profit the first time you go (which you can change whenever you want)…and the good feeling you’ll get. :) Shop ’til you help! :) 

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog. To support this or other blogs/organizations, buy  Amazon Gift Cards from a link on the site, then use those to buy your items. There will be no cost to you, and a benefit to them.

 


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